Tips for Spring Allergy Sufferers

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the May 11, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Spring Allergy Tips

Spring is a time for renewal, but if you suffer from seasonal allergies, nature’s rebirth can make this time of year miserable.

Hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, starts with cold-like symptoms. Unlike a cold that goes away in seven to ten days, an allergic reaction tends to linger until its source is identified and treated or no longer present. One of the most common causes of spring allergies is high pollen counts. Depending upon the type of pollen you are allergic to, this could happen at various points in the season. Different types of pollen peak at different times.

To reduce your exposure to pollen, monitor local pollen counts and take necessary precautions when the type of pollen you are allergic to is high. Precautions can include such things as starting to take allergy medicines or closing the windows in your home at night. Other tips include:

  • Stay inside on dry, windy days.
  • Change your clothes and shower after being outside to remove pollen.
  • Do not hang laundry outside.
  • Avoid being outdoors in the morning, when pollen counts are the highest.
  • Use air conditioning to cool your house or car.
  • Vacuum your floors often.

Seasonal allergies can develop at any time during your life and are not necessarily something you are born with. Sometimes signs of allergies aren’t straightforward, as it can be hard to distinguish an allergy from the common cold.

This is especially true with children. If you or your child has cold symptoms that last more than a week or seem to occur at the same time every year, you may want to talk with your healthcare provider about it. Only a certified healthcare provider can diagnose allergies and prescribe treatments.

More information on healthy living is available at the Oldham County Extension office. Call (502) 222-9453 and ask for Chris Duncan, Family and Consumer Science Agent.

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Senior Extension Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

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