2017 Kentucky Wood Expo

ky wood expo

The Kentucky Wood Expo will take place on September 15 and 16 in Lexington at Masterson Station Park. Open to the public, attendees will enjoy a wide variety of activities, demonstrations, and educational events. University of Kentucky Forestry and Natural Resources Extension is partnering with the Kentucky Forest Industries Association (KFIA) to put on several educational programs including: Small Scale Logging Demonstration, Your Backyard Woods, and the ever-popular Critter Tent including a new mammal display with skulls and skins of native Kentucky animals. In addition, Wood Expo attendees will once again have a chance to make and take home their own cutting boards. Other planned activities include live Country and Bluegrass Music, Chainsaw Carving Demonstrations, and a competition between local police and fire departments in forestry related events.

There are also several other contests that the public can participate in and a wide variety of crafts, food, and fun for the entire family. Make sure to come out to the Kentucky Wood Expo to cheer on the UK Forestry student team as they compete in the Collegiate Lumberjack Competition against seven other universities! Mark your calendars now and plan to join us at the 2017 Kentucky Wood Expo! Learn more by visiting here.

Events include:

  • Forestry Equipment Sales & Demonstrations
  • Lumberjack Competitions & Entertainment
  • Chainsaw Carving Demonstration & Auction
  • Crafts
  • Wood Expo Tickets

    General admission to the 2017 Kentucky Wood Expo will be $7.00 at the gate. Advance tickets are available for $5.00. Tickets are $5.00 for kids ages six to twelve. Kids under age six can enter free of charge. Parking is free.

    For further information, contact the KFIA Office via (502) 695-3979 or michele@kfia.org.

    ky wood exposition

    Wood Expo Competitors

    KFIA is looking for chainsaw carvers to participate in the Chainsaw Carving Competition in exchange for submitting a large carving completed during KY Wood Expo hours. Carvers will be provided wood and an outside space for carving during the show. One- to eight-foot white pine log will be supplied for the auction piece. First and second place prize money is available. The winner will be determined by the carving with the highest bid.

    Wood Expo Exhibitors

    Exhibit at the 2017 KY Wood Expo! KFIA is currently taking reservations to exhibit at the 2017 Kentucky Wood Expo, held September 15 and 16 at Masterson Station Park in Lexington, Kentucky. The Kentucky Forest Industries Association, Inc. will accommodate each exhibitor to the best of their ability while ensuring a successful show for all involved.

    For further information, contact the KFIA Office via (502) 695-3979 or michele@kfia.org.

    KY Spring Native Flowers

    Home to over twenty-five hundred plant species, Kentucky is a veritable wildflower garden. Kentucky native spring flowers include bloodroot, spring beauty, and Virginia bluebells.

    KY native wildflower

    Bloodroot

    Spring Kentucky Native Flower

    One of the earliest blooming wildflowers in Kentucky, bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) appears in the late winter and early spring. This native wildflower gets its name from its red-orange rhizome and the red juice that can be squeezed from it. Native Americans used bloodroot to treat fever, ulcers, ringworm, and skin infections. It finds use in dye-making and is also being studied for possible anti-cancer properties. Bloodroot, however, is toxic when ingested, causing vomiting and loss of consciousness.

    Bloodroot can be planted from seed or through root division. It can grow in sun or shade as long as rich, moist soil is available. You will find this short wildflower in both Kentucky’s woodlands and open fields. Bloodroot’s white flowers, yellow stamens at the center, are about an inch and a half to two inches across. A single round leaf accompanies each flower.

    KY wildflowers in blooms

    Spring Beauty

    Kentucky Spring Wildflower

    Spring beauty (Claytonia Virginica) is another of Kentucky’s early spring wildflowers. Less than a foot in height, the small white to pink flowers emerge before the trees begin to leaf out. Spring beauty opens in the morning to take in the sun’s warmth and closes again each evening. Its inconspicuous leaves blend in with surrounding grasses. Like many wildflowers, its loveliness is fading, blooms lasting only a couple weeks.

    Claytonia readily reseeds itself and can be found soaking up the sun across the eastern United States. Gardeners can collect the seeds to bring a little spring beauty to their own gardens.

    Spring beauty owes its name to John Clayton, an eighteenth century naturalist who so impressed Benjamin Franklin that the founding father “granted him free mail privileges for shipping his plants and letters.”

    KY wildflowers in bloom

    Virginia Bluebells

    Ephemeral KY Native Wildflower

    When traversing Kentucky’s woodlands in the early spring, you may encounter Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica), also called cowslip or mertensia. Virginia bluebells flourish in sandy and loamy soil and can often be found along creeks and other waterways. Nurseries and seed catalogs also carry these spring beauties. The nodding, bell-shaped wildflowers vary from blue to purple to pink. The inch-long trumpets bloom in clusters. Bluebells grow to a height of one to two feet, and if the growing conditions are right, they may quickly spread and naturalize. Bees, butterflies, and moths all pollinate them.

    This Kentucky native wildflower springs up after the last hard frost in March or April. A spring ephemeral, Virginia bluebells only bloom for two to three weeks before going to seed. The foliage dies back by early summer. Mass plantings are breath-taking while Virginia bluebells are in bloom, but they are short-lived and may leave a “hole” in your landscape once they have died back. Keep this transience in mind when planting bluebells in your garden.

    Virginia bluebells were a favorite of Thomas Jefferson’s and still grow at the Monticello today.

    KY Rain Garden Wildflowers

    Kentucky Wildflowers

    Native Plants Attract Butterflies and Bees

    Interested in planting wildflowers for pollinators? Bloodroot, spring beauty, and Virginia bluebells all attract butterflies and bees.

    For more information on using native plants to attract butterflies, check out the following resources:

    oldham county kentucky gardening

    Oldham County Gardening

    Upcoming Gardening Classes

    Oldham County Extension offers educational classes, the following of which are free and open to the public. RSVP for an upcoming gardening class in Oldham County, Kentucky via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. To get notifications of upcoming gardening classes, contact the Oldham County Extension office.

    Hellebores
    Friday, March 24, 6:30 p.m.
    Biologist Anne Cartwright of the American Hosta Society discusses another of her favorite flowers: hellebores. This gardening class is sponsored by the Oldham County Master Gardener Association.

    Wildflower Walks With Tavia
    Saturday, March 25
    Woodland Garden Walk: 10:15 a.m.
    Forest Trails Wildflower Walk: 12:15 p.m.
    March is a marvelous time to rediscover our scenic landscape and its many inhabitants. Tavia will share share medicinal uses of plants, how they got their names, any fun strategies of how they reproduce, and “flora-lore” and stories that have been told by Native Americans.

    Vegetable Gardening
    Tuesday, April 11, 6:30 p.m.
    Horticulturist Michael Boice will share tips on establishing and maintaining a successful home vegetable garden.

    Gardening for Wildlife
    Thursday, May 4, 6:30 p.m.
    Master Gardener Mike Guelda discusses using native plants to draw in birds, bees, and butterflies. This gardening class is sponsored by the Oldham County Master Gardener Association.

    Year-Round Irises
    Thursday, May 11, 10:00 a.m.
    Bob Strohman, author of the recently published Iris Red, Iris Dead and member of the Louisville Iris Society, shows how to have irises in bloom all twelve months of the year. This gardening class is sponsored by the Oldham County Master Gardener Association.

    Photographs by Jennifer Anderson (USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database), Paul Henjum, Christian Hummert, SB Johnny, Ryan Kaldari, Nicholas A. Tonelli, Sudhir Viswarajan. Used under the Creative Commons License.

    Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Master Gardener. Reviewed by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent.

    January 2017 Agriculture News/Events

    kentucky extension

    It is shaping up to be a busy winter season. We’ve added an event – on Friday, March 3, an inspector from the KY Department of Agriculture will be here to check your scales and certify them for farmers market sales. If you haven’t been through this process before, make sure you take a look at the Farmers Market manual to understand what constitutes a ‘legal’ scale.

    EXTENSION CLASSES

    Reserve your space by calling 222-9453 unless otherwise noted.

    • Industrial Hemp Seminar, February 9, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Shelby Co. Extension (includes lunch). Call 633-4593 to reserve space for this meeting. Agenda and presenter information available online.
    • Farmers Market Scale Certification, March 3, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., Oldham Co. Extension. No registration required. Scale regulations are available in the farmers market manual.
    • Adapting Your Garden as You Age, February 13, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension. Sponsored by Green Thumbs Garden Club and presented by Oldham County Horticulture Assistant Michael Boice.

    OC Gardening Classes

    • Grain Crop – Weed Control, February 21, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., Henry Co. Extension (includes lunch). Presented by UK Extension Specialist Dr. J.D. Green.
    • Grain Crop – Economics & Marketing, February 28, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., Shelby Co. Extension (includes lunch). Presented by UK Extension Specialist Dr. Greg Halich.
    • Grain Crop – 2016 Season Review & Production Fundamentals, March 14, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., Oldham County Extension (includes lunch). Presented by UK Extension Specialist Carrie Knott
    • Managing Nuisance Wildlife – Gardens & Farms, March 6, 6:00 – 8:15 p.m., John Black Community Center (includes dinner). Presented by UK Extension Specialist Dr. Matt Springer. He will discuss control measures for deer, raccoons, other small mammals, plus coyotes and black headed vultures.

    kentucky water

    • Living Along a KY Stream, March 16 from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. at Oldham County Extension. Registered participants will receive a tree seedling. Presented by Curry’s Fork Watershed Director Jen Shean and Oldham County Agriculture Agent Traci Missun.
    • Good Ag Practices Training, March 20, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., Oldham County Extension (Sampling Certificate Info Available on Request)

    ATTENTION, DOG OWNERS!

    If you own dogs, please make sure you keep them properly restrained on your property. This is for the safety of the dogs as well as for neighbors’ livestock. There have been three incidents this month of dogs killing livestock and poultry on farms. Even the most docile and gentle dog is capable of chasing and/or killing livestock.

    Under Kentucky Revised Statutes 258.235, “Any livestock owner or his agent, without liability, may kill any dog trespassing on that owner’s property and observed in the act of pursuing or wounding his livestock.” Help prevent these problems by keeping your dogs confined to your property. Problems with dogs running loose may be reported to Oldham County Animal Control, 222-7387.

    KY Forests

    CONSERVATION DISTRICT TREE GIVEAWAY

    Oldham County Conservation District will host their Arbor Day Tree Giveaway for Oldham County residents on March 25 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (or when all are trees are gone). The event will be held at their office, 700 West Jefferson Street in La Grange. These are the trees they plan to have available: Cypress, Eastern Redbud, Yellow Poplar, Wild Plum, White Oak, Pin Oak, KY Coffeetree, White Pine, Northern Red Oak, Pawpaw, Hazelnut, Chestnut Oak. Any questions should be directed to Andrea at 222-5123 or oldhamswcd@gmail.com.

    WHAT DO EXTENSION AGENTS DO IN WINTER?

    • Like many producers, agriculture agents attend classes and conferences to learn new practices to improve production. We also host and teach quite a few programs.
    • Agents still make farm visits in the winter. So far this month I’ve looked at property with new landowners to help them decide potential uses based on their interests. I’ve also visited several farms to pull hay samples for testing.
    • Agents often take leadership roles with different commodity groups, and winter is always a busy meeting season. I have the honor of serving as the Kentucky Forage & Grassland Council president this year. KFGC works closely with UK Extension to offer field days, grazing workshops, and conferences that will benefit producers. There are several coming up that will be of interest. If you would like to join or want to talk more about benefits of membership, just give me a call.
    • Agents like me often eat too much fattening food with the advent of hibernating weather. If you fall in that category, check out some healthy recipe ideas from my co-worker Chris Duncan.

    FRUIT PRODUCTION INFO

    growing apples

    SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

    • Oldham Co. Conservation District is accepting applications for the H. Glenn Watson scholarship – applications must be postmarked by February 1. Contact Andrea at 222-5123 or oldhamswcd@gmail.com to get an application. (For Oldham County high school seniors only)
    • Louisville Agricultural Club is offering scholarships – see their web page for details, guidelines and applications.
    • Kentucky Ag in the Classroom offers a list of several other ag scholarships.

    Written by Traci Missun, Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent at Oldham County Cooperative Extension. Traci addresses a variety of topics including farming, crops, pastures, and natural resources such as water and forestry.

    OC 4-H’ers Excel at State Shoot

    2016 KY State Shoot Results

    Oldham County 4-H Shooting Sports

    The Kentucky 4-H State Shooting Sports Competition was held in Wilmore, KY on September 10 and 11. Seventy-eight Oldham County 4-H’ers between the ages of nine and eighteen competed in .22 Pistol, .22 Rifle, Air Pistol, Archery, and Trap/Shotgun. Oldham County 4-H’ers won a total of fifty-four trophies, six jackets, and two top scores.

    oc 4h archery

    ARCHERY

    2nd Place Bare Bow Team (Age 9-11)
    Cole Powell
    Izzy Perez
    Andrew Myers
    Emma Reader

    2nd Place Bare Bow Team (Age 12-14)
    Spencer Wieland
    Anna Laverty
    Will Shannon
    Lilly Crook

    3rd Place Bare Bow Team (Age 15-18)
    Brandon Howard
    Max Renner
    Megan Snyder
    Sarah Griffin

    1st Place Individual Bare Bow (Age 12-14)
    Spencer Wieland

    oc 4h rifling

    RIFLE .22 Sport

    1st Place Team (Age 9-11)
    Cole Powell
    Sarah Grace Jackson
    Andrew Myers
    Izzy Perez

    1st Place Individual (Age 9-11)
    Cole Powell

    2nd Place Individual (Age 9-11)
    Sarah Grace Jackson

    1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
    Dain MacDonald
    Kaitlyn Snyder
    Brian Ball
    Parker Jones

    3rd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
    Dain MacDonald

    1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
    John Clore
    Dalton Harjes
    Shane Bickett
    Cameron Rice

    1st Place Individual (Age 15-18) (High Overall)
    John Clore

    2nd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
    Dalton Harjes

    3rd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
    Shane Bickett

    oc 4h air pistol

    AIR PISTOL

    1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
    Dain MacDonald
    Kaitlyn Snyder
    Brian Ball
    Logan Roberts

    1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
    Cameron Rice
    Shane Bickett
    Dalton Harjes
    John Clore

    1st Place Individual (Age 15-18)
    Shane Bickett (149 out of 150) High Overall

    3rd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
    John Clore

    oc 4h state shoot awards

    .22 PISTOL

    1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
    Dain MacDonald
    Kaitlyn Snyder
    Brian Ball
    Olivia Minor

    1st Place Individual (Age 12-14)
    Dain MacDonald

    2nd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
    Kaitlyn Snyder

    3rd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
    Olivia Minor

    1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
    Shane Bickett
    Dalton Harjes
    John Clore
    Cameron Rice

    2nd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
    John Clore

    Congratulations to everyone who participated!

    Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

    Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reviewed by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

    KY Aquaculture News

    KY aqua farming

    KY Aquatic Farming

    The Spring/Summer 2016 KY Aqua Farming News is now available for download.

    KY Aquaculture Articles

    Learn more about the aqua farming industry in Kentucky. In the latest newsletter, you will enjoy the following aquaculture informational articles:

    • Improving Market Access for Small-Scale Seafood Producers by Richard Bryant, Research Associate, Kentucky State University; Dr. Siddhartha Dasgupta, Professor and Principal Investigator, Kentucky State University; Angela Caporelli, Aquaculture Marketing Specialist; Dr. Laura Tiu, Aquaculture Specialist
    • Does Adding Taurine to the Feed Benefit Largemouth Bass? by Leigh Anne Bright, Aquaculture Investigator
    • Investigating Aquaculture and Water Reuse by Ken Semmens, Ph.D., Kentucky State University Aquaculture Research Center, and James Poindexter, London Utility Commission
    • Irrigating Late Summer Corn with Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus Pond Water in Western Kentucky: A Demonstration Project by Forrest Wynne, State Extension Aquaculture Specialist; and John Murdock and Rick Murdock, Ponderosa Farms

    For more information about Kentucky aquaculture, visit the KSU Aquaculture Research Center.

    Aquaculture Workshop

    The Third Thursday Thing is a monthly sustainable agriculture workshop targeting small farmers, beginning farmers, and agricultural professionals.

    aquaculture-workshop-schedule

    KY Aqua Farming News

    KY aqua farming

    KY Aquatic Farming

    The Spring 2016 KY Aqua Farming News is now available for download.

    KY Aquaculture Articles

    Learn more about the aqua farming industry in Kentucky. In the latest newsletter, you will enjoy the following aquaculture informational articles:

    • Effect of Dietary Carbohydrate on Fish Health Indicators in Largemouth Bass During Second Year Grow-out in Ponds by James Tidwell, KSU Aquaculture Division Chair; Shawn Coyle, KSU Aquaculture Research Associate; and Leigh Anne Bright, KSU Aquaculture Research Associate.
    • Size Selective Channel Catfish Harvest to Stock Kentucky Fee Fishing Ponds By Forrest Wynne, Kentucky State University State Extension Aquaculture Specialist, Graves County Cooperative Extension Office.
    • How Many Pounds of Paddlefish can be Grown in a Pond? By Ken Semmens, Ph.D., Kentucky State University Aquaculture Research Center.
    • Local Markets for Catfish in Kentucky by Siddhartha Dasgupta, Professor and Principal Investigator, Kentucky State University; Richard Bryant, Research Associate, Kentucky State University; and Alejandro Velasquez, Graduate Student, Kentucky State University.
    • Indoor Marine Shrimp Production at Kentucky State University by Andrew Ray, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Kentucky State University Aquaculture.

    For more information about Kentucky aquaculture, visit the KSU Aquaculture Research Center.

    Aquaculture Workshop

    The 2016 Aquaculture Workshop will take place on Saturday April 23, 2016 at Kentucky State University Aquaculture Research Center, located at 103 Athletic Road in Frankfort, KY.

    Moderator: Dr. Bob Durborow, State Extension Aquaculture Specialist

    9:15 Registration No charge
    9:45 Dr. Kirk Pomper Welcome from College of Ag / AFE
    10:00 Dr. Sid Dasgupta Aquaculture Economics
    10:15 Dr. Ken Semmens Floating Raceways
    10:30 Mr. Forrest Wynne Western KY Aquaculture
    10:45 Dr. Boris Gomelsky Koi, and Koi x Goldfish Hybrids
    11:00 – 11:30 Break to interact with speakers and other workshop participants
    11:30 Dr. Bob Durborow Fish Disease Management
    11:45 Dr. Andrew Ray Marine Shrimp
    12:00 – 1:30 Lunch and Networking
    1:30 Dr. Jim Tidwell Prawns
    1:45 Mr. Shawn Coyle Largemouth Bass
    2:00 Dr. Vikas Kumar Fish Nutrition, red claws, etc.
    2:15 Mr. Michael Tierney Aquaculture Marketing
    2:30 Tour of KSU Aquaculture Research Center
    3:30 – 4:15 Kentucky Aquaculture Association (KAA) Meeting

    If interested in attending the aquaculture workshop, contact Dr. Bob Durborow at (502) 597-6581 or robert.durborow@uky.edu.

    KY Forestry News

    ky tree flowers

    Spring 2016 Kentucky Forestry News

    To promote stewardship and sustainable management of Kentucky’s non-industrial private forests, the Kentucky Forestry Extension Service and Kentucky Division of Forestry publish multiple forestry resources including the Kentucky Woodlands Magazine. The current issue approaches a variety of topics: GMOs, mussels, logging, best management practices, the Northern long-eared bat, and more.

    Download the full edition of Kentucky Woodlands Magazine.

    KY Forestry

    2015 KY Forest Economic Report

    Kentucky Forestry Extension released the Kentucky Forestry Economic Report for 2015 which estimates Kentucky’s growing role in the national forest industry. Some of these stats include:

    • $9.1 billion in direct economic contribution.
    • $14.6 billion (9% increase) in total economic contribution.
    • 28,408 jobs in the forest industry; estimated 57,750 jobs overall.
    • 713 facilities located in 109 (of 120) Kentucky counties; gain of 10 facilities.

    Dr. Jeff Stringer, Kentucky Extension Professor, reported on Kentucky’s progress.

    KY tree park

    KY Forest Leadership Program

    The Kentucky Forest Leadership Program offers first-hand forestry experience to high school students. The program encourages the development of life-long learning skills, focusing on observation, action, and evaluation. This year’s participants will also have the opportunity to study entomology and wildlife. Students are also introduced to a variety of forestry-related careers such as civil engineering, entomology, soil science, wildlife habitat assessment, and water quality.

    For more information on the Kentucky Forest Leadership Program, contact Extension Associate Laurie Thomas.

    ky evergreen trees

    KY Forestry Events

    Ohio River Valley Woodlands & Wildlife Workshop
    April 2, 10 a.m.- 3:30 p.m.
    Cliffty Falls State Park
    Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio forestry and wildlife specialists will be available to answer land management questions.

    Kentucky Forest Industries Association Annual Meeting
    April 5-7
    The Brown Hotel in Downtown Louisville, KY
    Discuss current forestry issues, and enjoy numerous forest-related activities. Over 400 regional company representatives will be in attendance.

    Kentucky Woodland Owners Short Course
    July 16
    Henry County Extension
    Individuals and families have the opportunity to learn more about enhancing the woodlands on their property.

    ky trees flowering

    KY Forest Resources

    The University of Kentucky Department of Forestry is responsible for Kentucky research, instruction, and extension programs in forest and wildland natural resources.
    The Sustainable Forestry Initiative is a non-profit organization helping promote sustainable management of U.S. forests. Partnerships allow the Sustainable Forestry Initiative to award grants for forestry management improvement projects.

    Through various programs and services, the Kentucky Division of Forestry informs the public of the environmental, social, and economic importance of forest resources. In addition to forestry education, the Kentucky Division of Forestry is responsible for wildland fire management.

    The National Association of State Foresters encourage the protection and sustainable management of state and private forests. Kentucky is part of the Southern Group of State Foresters.

    Since 1900, the Society of American Foresters has informed and provided networking opportunities for American forestry professionals.

    Protecting nearly 200 national forests and grasslands, the U.S. Forest Service teaches sustainable practices for the health, diversity, and productivity of U.S. forests.

    Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reviewed by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent.

    2016 KY Horticulture News

    KY horticulture news

    2016 Winter KY Hort News

    Keep up to date on Kentucky horticulture with the State Horticulture Newsletter. In the winter edition, you’ll find feature articles such as:

    Upcoming Horticulture Classes

    Countless workshops and seminars across the state are extending knowledge about Kentucky horticulture. The following are but a few upcoming Kentucky horticulture events:

    February 17, 2016
    A Thing or Two About Gardening
    Hardinext.org
    Hardin County Extension Office (Elizabethtown)

    February 23, 2016
    Planning a Butterfly and Pollinator Garden
    Hardinext.org
    Hardin County Extension Office (Elizabethtown)

    February 24, 2016
    Milkweeds for Monarchs
    859-356-3155
    Kenton County Extension Office (Covington)

    Oldham County Horticulture

    Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent, and Michael Boice, Horticulture Assistant, work to spread horticultural knowledge in Oldham County, Kentucky. Accepting soil samples, identifying insects, and diagnosing plant behaviors are some of the ways they serve the community. The Oldham County Master Gardeners Association supports the extension agents and help teach Oldham Countians more about home horticulture.

    Upcoming horticulture and agriculture events in Oldham County include:

    Beeswax & Honey Bath/Body Products
    Friday, February 12, 2016 8:00 PM
    Free demonstration by Lauren Pulz of Single Barrel Soaps, an Oldham County small business. Sponsored by the Oldham County Beekeepers Association.

    Master Gardener Classes Begin
    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 4:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    Contact the extension office for further information.

    Spring Vegetable Gardening Workshop
    Saturday, March 19, 2016 10:00 AM – noon
    RSVP: (502) 222-9453

    KY State Horticulture News

    Winter KY Horticulture News

    Winter 2015 Kentucky Horticulture News

    Keep up to date on Kentucky horticulture with the State Horticulture Newsletter. In the winter edition, you’ll find feature articles such as:

    More about composting.

    Upcoming Horticulture Events

    Countless workshops and seminars across the state are extending knowledge about Kentucky horticulture. The following are but a few upcoming Kentucky horticulture events:

    November 21, 2015
    Beginner Beekeeping School
    502-348-9204
    Nelson County Extension Office (Bardstown)

    January 12, 2016
    Landscape Drawing Class
    270-554-9520
    McCracken County Extension Office (Paducah)

    March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2016
    Backyard Fruit Series
    270-842-1681
    Warren County Extension Office (Bowling Green)

    Oldham County Horticulture

    Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent, and Michael Boice, Horticulture Assistant, work to spread horticultural knowledge in Oldham County, Kentucky. Accepting soil samples, identifying insects, and diagnosing plant behaviors are some of the ways they serve the community. The Oldham County Master Gardeners Association supports the extension agents and help teach Oldham Countians more about home horticulture.

    Upcoming horticulture and agriculture events in Oldham County include:

    Early Bird Grain Meeting
    Monday, December 7, 2015 8:00 a.m. – noon

    Private Pesticide Applicator Training
    Friday, December 11, 2015 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
    RSVP: (502) 222-9453

    Oldham County Beekeepers Association Meeting
    Friday, December 11, 2015 6:30 p.m.
    Open to anyone interested in beekeeping

    The Power of Kentucky Forestry

    The following Agriculture article printed in the October 29, 2015 edition of the Oldham Era.

    Support Kentucky Forests

    Kentucky forests

    University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service is currently offering a forestry webinar series, designed primarily for woodland owners, but is open to anyone interested in woodland, timber, and wildlife topics.

    The goal of this series is to provide beneficial information that woodland owners can incorporate on their properties. Each session begins at 7:00 p.m. EST and lasts approximately one hour. The technology allows participants at each site to ask questions of the experts. The Trimble County Extension office will be broadcasting three of the five webinars. Individuals can also participate from any computer with high-speed internet. Visit UK Ag Forestry Extension for further information.

    “The Forestry Fall Webinar series is an excellent opportunity for people to receive a significant amount of information in a relatively short time, without having to drive great distances to attend,” said Billy Thomas, UK extension forester and one of the series coordinators.

    The following webinars will be broadcasted in Trimble County:

    • October 29—Landowners and Federally Protected Species: What You Need to Know
    • November 12—Are Your Woodlands Healthy?
    • November 19—Timber Harvesting and Sales

    This forestry series helps kick off National Forest Products Week, October 18-24, 2015. A USDA blog post titled “Support Healthy Markets this National Forest Products Week” celebrates America’s forests and forestry industry.

    “Our forests are renewable and vital resources when sustainably managed,” writes Scott Bissette, Assistant Commissioner of the North Carolina Forest Service and chair of the National Association of State Foresters Forest Markets Committee.

    Bissette cites the American Forest & Paper Association (AFPA) when discussing the industry’s colossal impact on our economy. According to the AFPA’s website, about 900,000 people are employed in forestry, contributing over $210 billion in forestry products each year. Around one-fifth of the world’s paper is produced here.

    Such a high level of productivity demands sustainable management. Bisette says, “I’m proud to say that my home state of North Carolina has made sustainability and native species restoration high priorities for its 18.6 million acres of forest land. This commitment contributes to the stability and long-term potential of our forest products industry, which already contributes more than $6 billion to the state’s gross product and provides more than $28 billion in economic benefit.”

    Following the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008—which requires states to evaluate current forest resources, prioritize areas in need, and strategize meeting forestry needs—the Kentucky Division of Forestry drew Kentucky’s Forest Action Plan.

    Forest Health Management

    The first of the five issues named in Kentucky’s Forest Action Plan concerns restoring and managing forest health. The forestry division made nine goals:

    1. Reduce the spread of invasive plants, insects, and diseases through improved monitoring, management, and education.
    2. Decrease the impacts on forests due to improper trail use, management, and design.
    3. Utilize trees to decrease air pollution in urban areas.
    4. Conduct research to improve forest health management techniques and further assess the health of Kentucky’s forests.
    5. Promote reforestation opportunities on post-mining land.
    6. Enhance comprehensive wildfire prevention programs in Kentucky to reduce the number of human-caused wildfires in Kentucky.
    7. Provide leadership, support, and coordination for educating the public about wildfires in Kentucky.
    8. Enhance and improve wildfire law enforcement programs.
    9. Maintain and enhance the statewide system of forest fire protection and suppression as required by KRS 149.520.

    Kentucky Water Quality

    Kentucky’s Forest Action Plan next addresses water quality and quantity. Due to “62% of the rivers and streams and 42% of the lakes, ponds, and reservoirs of Kentucky showing some sort of water quality impairment,” Kentucky needs to focus on improving water quality. Both forests and individual urban trees have their part to play in restoring Kentucky’s waters. Goals in this area are:

    1. Ensure timber harvest operations employ measures to maximize water quality protection.
    2. Improve Kentucky water quality through the protection, enhancement, and restoration of forested riparian areas.
    3. Reduce rate of variation in stream flow and volume with forestry practices.
    4. Improve Kentucky water quality through the protection, enhancement, and creation of forested wetlands.
    5. Increase the public awareness of the relationship between forestland use and water quality and quantity.

    Kentucky Forest Loss

    Thirdly, Kentucky’s Forest Action Plan identifies the issue of forest fragmentation and loss. Only 28% of Kentucky’s forest resources are wide tracts of land covered in trees. Major sources of forestry loss include deforestation to make way for urban, agricultural, and mining purposes. The Kentucky Division of Forestry set the following goals:

    1. Reduce or minimize the impact of forest loss from urban development.
    2. Enhance and protect existing forested areas in the urban landscape.
    3. Increase acres of traditional forests in urban areas.
    4. Increase forest cover on mined land.
    5. Reduce or minimize the impact of forest loss and fragmentation due to agricultural conversion.
    6. Increase acres of protected forestlands.
    7. Protect or minimize the impact of fragmentation on large forest blocks.

    Kentucky Forest Management

    Kentucky’s Forest Action Plan then discusses forest management. Although Kentucky’s land is about half forest, most is neglected by private property owners. There is great need in publicizing the valuable natural resource Kentucky has in its forests. The goals below keep that in mind:

    1. Publicize the value of Kentucky’s forest resources and the benefits of proper management.
    2. Promote the efficient, sustainable, and environmentally sound economic utilization of Kentucky’s forest resources for forest products and environmental services.
    3. Enable private family forest owners to enhance their stewardship potential through technical and financial assistance.
    4. Establish and build local urban and community forestry programs.
    5. Monitor forest management levels in Kentucky to identify trends, needs, benefits, and threats.

    Investing in Kentucky Forests

    Finally, Kentucky’s Forest Action Plan isolates funding. “Investments in Kentucky forests are an investment in Kentucky’s future,” leading to a singular goal: “proper forest management that results in a healthy, productive forest ecosystem that is the source of long-term sustainable revenue and benefits all of Kentucky.” The Kentucky Division of Forestry plans to educate land owners on ways to make money off their forests, promote benefits and opportunities that communities enjoy from visually-pleasing forests, offer economic incentives for proper forest management on private land, and partnerships allowing further outreach across the Commonwealth.

    To learn more about Kentucky’s Forest Resource Strategy, view the Kentucky Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources online.

    Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reviewed by Traci Missun, Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent.