Heart Disease in Men

exercise for good health

Heart Disease in Men

Adult Health Bulletin

Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease, is a term used to describe a wide variety of heart conditions, the most common being coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease can cause a heart attack. Other heart diseases affect the valves in the heart or the ability of the heart to pump blood effectively. Men and women alike are at risk for heart disease, and in fact, it is the leading cause of death for both Kentucky men and women.

Heart Disease Facts About Men

  • The leading cause of death for men in the United States is heart disease. It is the cause for almost one out of four male deaths.
  • Half of men who die from heart disease did not have any previous symptoms.
  • Of all sudden cardiac events, 70 to 89 percent occur in men.

heart health & blood pressure

Key Risk Factors for Heart Disease

  • High blood pressure (also known as hypertension)
  • High LDL cholesterol
  • Smoking

Other risk factors include:

  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Poor diet
  • Inactivity
  • Excessive alcohol

men's heart health

According to the American Heart Association:

  • Among men age 20 and older, 33.4 percent of white males and 42.6 perfect of African American males have high blood pressure.
  • 41.3 percent of U.S. males over the age of 20 have a total cholesterol level over 200mg/dL.
  • 21.3 percent of males smoke cigarettes.
  • Approximately 72.9 percent of men age 20 and older are overweight or obese.
  • Of approximately 19.7 million Americans with diabetes, about 9.6 million are men (almost 49 percent).

Having a healthy heart is very important. How well are you taking care of yours?

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reference material from the American Heart Association.

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Staying Positive Provides Health Benefits

Importance of Staying Positive

Adult Health Bulletin

Did you know there are actually health benefits to positive thinking? According to research, people have fewer physical complaints if they think positively and reflect on things they are grateful for at least once a week. Staying positive is an important part of mental health.

health benefits from positive thinking

Staying Positive

When you are positive, it does not mean that you should ignore challenges or tough times, rather positive thinking is trying to see the bright side as much as possible. It may take some time and practice to start thinking more positively. Try these tips for living a more positive life:

  • Write down dreams and goals. One way to stay positive is to write down your goals and dreams for the future. By writing them down, you are actually setting the groundwork for reaching your goal. Be detailed about what you want and how you think you can reach that dream or goal.
  • Say thank you. Being thankful and expressing gratitude is an important part of staying positive. You can do this in many ways, such as keeping a journal of things you are grateful for, writing a letter to someone who made a difference in your life, and making an effort to say “thank you” to all people who helped you throughout the week.
  • Avoid worrying. For some people, worrying is part of everyday life. Instead of worrying, try to find a way to solve the problem you are facing. You may also try to distract yourself from worrying if it is something beyond your control.

healthy lifestyle

  • Watch out for all-or-nothing thinking. Remember that if something does not go the way you think it should go, it does not mean that it will always be that way. That one time was that one time. Take steps to have a different outcome if it is something that you can control.
  • Slow down. Sometimes, when things are moving too fast, we get stressed. Lots of stress can lead to negative thinking. If you are feeling stressed — whether that is happening while talking, eating, or even rushing around to get something done — take the time slow down. Slowing down will allow you to think clearly about what you need to do.
  • Eat well and stay active. Did you know that eating unhealthy food and not being active can actually make you feel worse? On the other hand, eating healthy foods and staying active on a regular basis helps improve your mood and general health.

stay positive and eat healthy

It can be hard to develop healthy habits like staying positive. Try some of these different ways to stay positive and see how much better you will feel!

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from Mental Health America.

Adult Health Screenings

adult health screenings

Health Screenings

Adult Health Bulletin

Every adult should get screened for illnesses when they visit their healthcare provider. Some screenings can be done right in the provider’s office. There are some screenings that need special equipment and may need to be done at a separate appointment.

General Screenings

  • Diabetes: This illness can cause many problems with your body including, but not limited to: heart, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. You should get screened if you have high blood pressure or take medicine for high blood pressure.
  • Hepatitis C Virus (Hep C): Hep C is an infection of the liver. You should get screened one time for Hep C if you were born between 1945 and 1965 or if you received a blood transfusion before 1992.

High Blood Cholesterol Screening

High blood cholesterol can lead to dangerous disease like heart disease or stroke. Have your blood cholesterol checked regularly with a blood if:

  • You use tobacco.
  • You are overweight or obese.
  • You have a history of heart disease or blocked arteries.
  • Your family has a history of heart disease.

High Blood Pressure Screening

High blood pressure can cause strokes, heart attacks, kidney and eye problems, and heart failure. Your blood pressure should be checked at least every two years.

high blood blood facts

Lung Cancer Screening

You should talk to your healthcare provider about a lung cancer screening if you are between the ages of 55 and 80, smoke now, or have quit within the past 15 years.

Colon Cancer Screening

A person between the ages of 50 and 75 should get a colon cancer screening. This screening can be done in several ways, so talk to your healthcare provider about your options. If your family has a history, you may want to talk to your healthcare provider about getting screened before the age of 50.

Women Specific Screenings

  • Osteoporosis: This test is used to make sure you have strong bones. This screening can also be done in several different ways. Talk to your healthcare provider about getting this screening done.
  • Breast Cancer: A mammogram is the screening test used to detect breast cancer. Talk to your healthcare provider about scheduling a mammogram and how often it is needed.
  • Cervical Cancer: This screening is one that typically starts around the age of 21 and is continued until around the age of 65. Talk to your healthcare provider about the screening called a Pap smear. Your provider may also encourage you to be tested for human papillomavirus, also known as HPV.

health screenings

Screenings are important ways to make sure that you do not have an illness or disease without symptoms. It is important to talk with your healthcare provider to determine which screenings are needed for you.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reference material from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Tips for Getting (and Staying) Healthy

healthy lifestyle

Create & Keep a New Healthy Habit

Adult Health Bulletin

Habits can be good or they can be not-so-good. Have you ever tried to change one of your not-so-good habits, only to go back to your usual routine? It can be hard to keep up the motivation for a change in behavior.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when you are trying to create and keep a new, healthy habit.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #1

It does not have to be “all or nothing.” Many times when we start to change a behavior, we tend to think that we need to be perfect 100 percent, with no slip-ups. Staying motivated at that pace is hard, especially if you are trying to change too many things at once. Instead, start small. If you want to start walking, find a time for just 10 minutes and build up to 30 minutes. If you want to start eating healthier, choose one meal a day to start. Pack a healthy lunch from home instead of getting lunch from a fast food place.

Just remember that you do not have to do everything all at once.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #2

Be creative. It can be hard to find the time to make healthy habits. If you get creative, you may be able to get a little “extra” accomplished. Instead of looking for the best parking spot, park in the back of the lot and walk, or take the stairs rather than the elevator. If focusing on making healthy food choices, pack your favorite fruit as a treat for that midday slump, or add green vegetables to a smoothie. These little boosts will help you reach your goal.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #3

Be patient with yourself. Creating and sticking with a new health habit is hard. And remember that it can take time to see results when making a change. You could write down your actions and keep track of successes and areas for improvement. Don’t forget to celebrate the successes that you have. Small successes can add up to big changes!

happy healthy lifestyle

Changing habits is very difficult. When trying to create and keep a new health habit, think about starting small to achieve your goals, be creative in changing your habits, and be patient with yourself as you strive to develop a healthier lifestyle.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Mayo Clinic.

Tips for Spring Allergy Sufferers

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the May 11, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Spring Allergy Tips

Spring is a time for renewal, but if you suffer from seasonal allergies, nature’s rebirth can make this time of year miserable.

Hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, starts with cold-like symptoms. Unlike a cold that goes away in seven to ten days, an allergic reaction tends to linger until its source is identified and treated or no longer present. One of the most common causes of spring allergies is high pollen counts. Depending upon the type of pollen you are allergic to, this could happen at various points in the season. Different types of pollen peak at different times.

To reduce your exposure to pollen, monitor local pollen counts and take necessary precautions when the type of pollen you are allergic to is high. Precautions can include such things as starting to take allergy medicines or closing the windows in your home at night. Other tips include:

  • Stay inside on dry, windy days.
  • Change your clothes and shower after being outside to remove pollen.
  • Do not hang laundry outside.
  • Avoid being outdoors in the morning, when pollen counts are the highest.
  • Use air conditioning to cool your house or car.
  • Vacuum your floors often.

Seasonal allergies can develop at any time during your life and are not necessarily something you are born with. Sometimes signs of allergies aren’t straightforward, as it can be hard to distinguish an allergy from the common cold.

This is especially true with children. If you or your child has cold symptoms that last more than a week or seem to occur at the same time every year, you may want to talk with your healthcare provider about it. Only a certified healthcare provider can diagnose allergies and prescribe treatments.

More information on healthy living is available at the Oldham County Extension office. Call (502) 222-9453 and ask for Chris Duncan, Family and Consumer Science Agent.

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Senior Extension Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Recall Alert: Granola, Macadamia Nuts, Nut Butters, Dog Treats

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) releases food and drug recall notices to help consumers stay informed. Sign up to receive email notifications of Recalls, Market Withdrawals, and Safety Alerts.

Wildway Grain-Free Granola Recalled

Wildway LLC issued a voluntary recall for multiple grain-free granola products. This recall follows notification by an ingredient supplier that one of the granola ingredients may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria can cause serious (sometimes fatal) illness in children, the elderly, and other people with weakened immune systems. Symptoms may include high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Additionally, Listeria infections can cause pregnant women to suffer miscarriages and stillbirths.

Affected products can be identified by lot codes and “Best By” dates. These recalled granola products were distributed nationwide.

Product Size Lot Codes Best By
Wildway Apple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola
(UPC: 85866005190)
8 oz. 096
097
040618
040718
Wildway Apple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola
(UPC: 864352000015)
10 oz. 097 040718
Wildway Banana Nut Grain-free Granola
(UPC: 858660005176)
8 oz. 089
096
100
033018
040618
041018
Wildway Coconut Cashew Grain-free Granola
(UPC: 858660005183)
8 oz. 090
096
101
103117
110617
111117
Wildway Coconut Cashew Grain-free Granola 10 oz. 090
096
102
103117
110617
111117
Wildway Vanilla Bean Espresso Grain-free Granola
(UPC: 858660005206)
8 oz. 089
090
033018
033118

Wildway issued the following statement concerning this food recall:

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. Consumers should discontinue use of the product listed above and may return the product to the retail establishment it was purchased at for a refund. Consumers with further questions or concerns may call Customer Care at 1-844-617-8240 which is open 8:30am-5:30pm CST, Monday to Friday and you can leave a message after hours.

Kroger Expands Nut Recall

Kroger recently expanded the Simple Truth Dry Roasted Macadamia Nuts recall, originally recalled due to potential Listeria contamination. The recalled macadamia nuts come in a 12 ounce package. Consumers can find the expiration dates on the side of the clear plastic packaging: Dec. 09, 2017; Mar. 02, 2018; Mar. 03, 2018; or Apr. 07, 2018. The UPC is 11110-02478. Recalled nuts products were distributed between December 9, 2016 and June 13, 2017.

recalled macadamia nuts

This macadamia nut recall includes the following distributors: Baker’s, City Market, Copps, Dillons, Food 4 Less, Foods Co., Fred Meyer, Fry’s, Gerbes, Jay C, King Soopers, Kroger, Metro Market, Owen’s, Pay Less, QFC, Ralphs, Ruler Foods, Pick ‘N Save, and Smith’s.

If you purchased a package of recalled Simple Truth Macadamia Nuts, cease consumption of the affected product immediately.

Almond Bars Recalled

GoMacro initiated a recall of specific lots of MacroBars and Thrive Bars following a message from their almond supplier that the almond ingredient may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Recalled MacroBars and Thrive Bars may have been distributed (nationwide as well as internationally) to retail stores and via mail order and direct delivery.

recalled nuts bars

Name of Product Unit Size Best By Date UPC Lot Code
Coconut + Almond Butter + Chocolate Chips MacroBar 2.3 oz (65g) 1/3/2018,
1/10/2018,
1/16/2018,
1/26/2018,
2/6/2018
853555006689 3516,
3525,
3536,
3553,
3571
Coconut + Almond Butter + Chocolate Chips Mini MacroBar 0.9 oz (25g) 1/16/2018,
2/6/2018
853555006719 3537,
3570
Chocolate, Nuts & Sea Salt Thrive Bar 1.4 oz (40g) 2/6/2018,
2/9/2018
853555006504 3569,
3576
1.4 oz (40g) 2/6/2018 853555006528 3568

Recalled nut bars can be identified by “best by” dates, UPCs, and lot codes. These numbers can be found on the side panel of the products in question. Consumers who have bought products affected by this recall are encouraged to return them to place of purchase and exchange them for full refunds.

Nutty Infusions Recall Expanded

nut butter recalled

Specific lots of Nutty Infusions nut butters are being recalled due to possibility of Listeria contamination. The FDA found evidence that a supplier’s facility may have been contaminated during production of the nut butters. Only two flavors of the Ellyndale Nutty Infusions are affected by this recall: Roasted Almond Butter and Mango Chili Cashew Butter.

Description Lot Number Best By Date
Ellyndale® Nutty Infusions™ Roasted Almond Butter, 10 oz. plastic jars 2124119 2/18
Ellyndale® Nutty Infusions™ Mango Chili Cashew Butter, 10 oz. plastic jars 2125156 3/19

This is an expansion of a previous recall: original nut butter recall.

Frozen Scomber Fish Recalled

“The Duck” brand of “frozen steamed scomber fish” is under recall. During routine sampling, the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets found that the frozen fish had not been properly eviscerated before it was processed. The viscera is the most likely part of the fish to cause concentrated amounts of Clostridium botulinum spores which cause botulism.

Botulism is a serious illness that attacks the nervous system. Botulism symptoms include double or blurred vision, drooping eyelids, difficulty swallowing, slurred speech, dry mouth, and muscle weakness. Symptoms usually show 18 to 36 hours after consuming contaminated food but can begin as soon as six hours after eating.

The recalled frozen fish have distributed to retail stores across the nation. The product in question comes in a styrofoam tray covered in clear plastic. The red label, which includes nutrition information, is marked “Product of Thailand.” UPC is 040459097206.

recalled fish

The FDA encourages consumers to return packages of steamed scomber fish to place of purchase. Questions may be directed to Willis Ocean Inc: 718-386-3053.

Protein Bars Recalled

Bulletproof 360 Inc is recalling specific protein bar and protein bite products due to a potential Listeria contamination. A cashew butter supplier recently discovered Listeria contamination in their facility. This recall is out of an abundance of caution, as the protein bars and bites were processed in a different part of the facility.

From April 7 to June 12, the recalled protein bars were distributed both to retail stores and online. All states may be affected as well as the following countries: Australia, Bahrain, Bermuda, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Cayman Islands, China, Finland, France, Germany, Guam, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Liechtenstein, Macau, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Virgin Islands (USA).

Consumers should view the protein product recall to determine whether or not they purchased recalled products. The company is shipping replacement protein bars and bites.

Dog Treats Recalled

Specific lots of Loving Pets dog treats are under recall due to potential Salmonella contamination. Salmonella is dangerous both to pets and the humans that handle the treats. Salmonella symptoms in humans include abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. Pets suffering from Salmonella infections may also exhibit diarrhea, fever, vomiting, and lethargy.

Check the dog treats recall on the FDA’s website to determine whether or not you have bought an affected product.

Rawhide Dog Chews Recalled

Multiple brands of rawhide dog chews are being recalled by United Pet Group after finding that certain facilities are using a quaternary ammonium compound mixture during the manufacturing process. The United States has not approved the compound for use in producing rawhide chews for dogs. It is, however, approved to clean food processing equipment.

Diarrhea and vomiting has been reported in connection with this dog rawhide recall. Consumers primarily complain of the unpleasant smell exhibited by affected products. Recalled dog rawhides were distributed to retail stores nationwide as well as through online outlets.

American Beefhide, Digest-eeze, and Healthy Hide were all included in the recall. Consumers should view the rawhide dog chews recall to identify recalled products.

June Food Recalls

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) releases food and drug recall notices to help consumers stay informed. Sign up to receive email notifications of Recalls, Market Withdrawals, and Safety Alerts.

Aldi’s Cashews Recalled

Specifics lots of Southern Grove Cashew Halves and Pieces with Sea Salt are under recall due to potential contamination of glass pieces. The affected product comes in an eight-ounce (227 gram) canister. It may be identified by UPC code 041498179366 and best by date of 11/27/18 or 11/28/18.

Aldi cashews recalled

The recalled cashews may have been distributed to Aldi stores in Washington D.C. as well as Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin, and West Virginia.

Consumers should dispose of or return recalled packages of cashews for full refunds.

Queso Fresco Cheese Recall

Global Garlic Inc. recently expanded its recall of Queso Fresco cheese due to potential Listeria contamination. Listeria monocytogenes is an organism with the potential to cause serious (sometimes fatal) illness in children, the elderly, and other people with weakened immune systems.Symptoms include high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Additionally, Listeria infections can cause pregnant women to suffer miscarriages and stillbirths.

The recalled cheese products were distributed in Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, and North Carolina. Identify affected products with the following information:

  • Recalled “Queso Fresco / Whole Milk” products come in sixteen ounce, clear plastic packaging. The UPC is 8-96211-00235-9, and an expiration date of September 19, 2017 is stamped on the side.
  • “Queso Fresco x LB (Barra)/Whole Milk Cheese” products are weighted around five to six pounds. It comes in clear, plastic packaging, lacking UPC number. The expiration date is June 17, 2017.
  • Customers who have purchased the recalled cheese products may return them for full refunds.

    Kroger Snack Kits Recalled

    Chef Club LLC initiated a voluntary recall of Retail Snack Kits due to the possibility that they were contaminated with Listeria. Affected products were processed on May 30 and 31 and can be identified using information from the following table.

    Name of Product Brand Name Unit Size Use By Dates UPC Lot Codes
    Veggie Tray with Apples Fresh Selections by Kroger 6.25 oz (177g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 1111091544 7150KT8
    Fruit Tray with Carrots Fresh Selections by Kroger 7 oz (198g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 1111091451 7150KT5, 7151KT3
    Veggie Tray with Pretzels Fresh Selections by Kroger 5.75 oz (163g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 1111091477 7150KT6, 7150KT8
    Veggie Tray with Snap Peas Fresh Selections by Kroger 6 oz (170g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 1111091484 7150KT7, 7150KT8
    Veggie Tray with Ranch Dip Fresh Selections by Kroger 6.75 oz (191g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 1111091472 7151KT3, 7150KT6
    Snack Tray with Almonds & Apples Fresh Selections by Kroger 5.75 oz (163g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 1111091481 7150KT5, 7150KT7
    Snack Tray with Baby Carrots, Sliced Apples, Raw Almonds, and Cheddar Bar Club Chef LLC 5.75 oz (163g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 0 1727800703 7 7150KT6
    Snack Tray with Peanut Butter (Celery Sticks, Sliced Apples, Peanut Butter and Raisins) Club Chef LLC 5.5 oz (155g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 0 17278 00704 4 715KT6
    Snack Tray with Sliced Apples, Almonds, Raisins and Caramel Dip Club Chef LLC 4 oz (113g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 0 1727800701 3 715KT6
    Veggie Tray with Carrots, Celery, Broccoli Florets and Ranch Dip Club Chef LLC 6.75 oz (191g) 06/11/2017 & 06/12/2017 0 1727800702 0 715KT6

    The recalled snack kits may have been distributed to Kroger stores in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia.

    Do not consume these recalled fruit and veggie trays. Questions can be directed to Club Chef at 866-458-3188.

    Youth Heart Disease Information

    youth heart disease info

    Heart Disease

    Youth Health Bulletin

    Have you ever heard that someone you know has heart disease? It is a very common illness, and in fact, more than 60 million Americans have it. Wally Cat wants to make sure you know what heart disease is and how you can take care of your heart.

    What is Heart Disease?

    Heart disease is also known as cardiovascular disease. As you may have guessed, a person who has heart disease has problems with their heart and blood vessels — they are not working the way they should.

    There are many problems that people with heart disease have, such as high blood pressure and chest pains. People with heart disease are also more likely to have heart attacks and strokes. A heart attack is when there is a blockage of blood flow to the heart. This means that the heart is not getting the blood that is needed for it to work properly. A stroke is when a place in the brain is not getting enough blood.

    Other Problems for People With Heart Disease

    • The arteries get hard, making it more difficult to move blood through the body.
    • An area of fat and cholesterol builds up, making the passageway for blood narrower. This makes it harder for blood to get to the body.

    Can You Catch Heart Disease?

    Heart disease is not an illness that is spreads by germs like a cold! There are risk factors that can increase a person’s chances of getting heart disease. Some of the risk factors cannot be controlled, such as getting older and having other people in the family with the disease. There are some risk factors that can be controlled, such as smoking, having high blood pressure, being overweight, or not exercising enough.

    How Do You Prevent Heart Disease?

    There are ways you can start to prevent heart disease even at your age. You can watch out for some of the risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and physical inactivity. As a child, you can watch what you eat and how much you are active.

    youth heart disease information

    Try to eat lots of fruits and vegetables — and if they are fresh, even better! Also, you should try to be as active as you can. Throughout the day, you should be active for at least an hour. You also want to be aware of how much time you are sitting in front of a screen, whether it is the TV, computer, tablet, or phone. This type of activity has little to no physical activity.

    Fun ways to be physically active include:

    • Riding your bike. You might be able to go for a bike ride in your neighborhood or at a nearby park.
    • Swimming. Join a swim team through your school or community. The Oldham County YMCA has an indoor pool so you can stay active even during winter.
    • Walking your dog. Physical activity is good for you and Fido too!

    Wally Cat wants you to know about heart disease because it affects so many people. He also wants you to start good habits to protect your heart, such as eating healthy and staying active.

    Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control. Wally Cat illustrations by Chris Ware (© University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences).

    Get Your Kids to Eat Their Veggies

    get kids to eat veggies

    Getting Children to Eat Their Veggies

    Do you hear “I don’t like vegetables!” during family dinner? According to research from the American Academy for Science and the Centers for Disease Control, children turn up their noses at vegetables because parents have not made them readily available. Let’s face it, few children will take the time to wash a head of broccoli or cauliflower, break the pieces apart, serve them up on a plate, and then eat them.

    Parents can increase the chances that their children will eat a particular vegetable if it is in a small container or individual plastic bag in the refrigerator. This makes vegetables an easy snack option for children to choose themselves.

    get kids eating veggies

    Children form food habits at an early age. Research shows a correlation between picky children and picky adults. It is important for parents to introduce good eating habits in children when they are young. It is, however, never too late to start.

    Tips to Get Children to Eat Vegetables

    Be a role model. Offer vegetables to children by eating them yourself. Let children approach them on their own.

    Set some rules. Children usually will accept vegetables in an environment where parents set appropriate rules. For example, it is okay to tell your child they need to taste a vegetable before they decide they do not like it.

    Stay positive. Using strategies such as punishment, threats, force, or even offering the child a reward have been shown to be unsuccessful ways of teaching children to eat vegetables. Vegetables should be offered in a relaxed environment.

    Don’t give up. Keep offering the vegetables. It might be helpful to offer the vegetable to the child in different ways or mixing the vegetable with other foods. Many parents throw in the towel after the child refuses a vegetable the first time, but understand that children generally have a fear of new foods. It may take about eight to ten tries with a vegetable before your child is ready to taste it. In addition, it may take a lot more tasting before your child gets to the point where he or she likes the vegetable. Be patient as your child experiences new foods.

    Be creative. Offer children vegetables in different forms (cooked, raw, and mixed with other foods) before you decide they do not like them.

    Be flexible. Children vary in how much they eat and what they like. Each child is an individual. Do not have predetermined ways in which your child should eat or accept vegetables.

    Be reasonable. Keep in mind that vegetable servings for children are smaller than vegetable servings for adults. A general guideline is one tablespoon of vegetable for each year of life. Do not have unrealistic expectations for your child.

    Give options. Offer a variety of vegetables at a particular meal. This allows children to be able to choose a vegetable they like.

    get your children to get their vegetables

    Take Action: Make it Happen

    Vegetables offers protection from many diseases, and thanks to the vitamins and minerals they provide, improves your child’s health. It is important for children to eat the recommended amount of vegetables daily.

    Parents, try these tricks to make vegetables more enticing to your children:

    • Offer vegetables daily. Children will not eat vegetables if parents do not cook and serve them.
    • Let children pick out a vegetable of the week at the grocery store.
    • Make vegetables easy for children to grab and eat. Have ready to eat vegetable snacks in small bags in the refrigerator.
    • Set out a plate of vegetables with dip before dinner or when children get home from school.
    • Prepare vegetables in a way in which they are tender but crisp. Children tend to dislike mushy vegetables and many prefer raw vegetables for this reason.
    • Include two vegetables at dinner; try offering both cooked and raw vegetables. This allows children to have a choice of vegetable they want to eat.
    • Add lettuce leaves to sandwiches.
    • Add blended vegetables such as spinach to spaghetti sauce, soups, and casserole. It is a good idea to blend or cut up the vegetable finely before adding it to spaghetti sauce. Children may not even notice the vegetable is there.
    • Make food fun. Let children create funny faces or animals with cut up vegetables.
    • Let children help prepare vegetable recipes; they generally enjoy what they have made.
    • Allow kids to make their own salad. Put out small bowls of baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, shredded leaf lettuce, raisins, fruit, and crunch noodles. They love the feeling of control that comes from doing it themselves.
    • Try heirloom vegetables. Kids get excited about interesting vegetables. Take your children to a farmer’s market and have them pick out the heirlooms they would like to try.

    getting kids to eat veggies

    Written by Ingrid Adams, Nutrition and Food Science Extension Specialist; Mallory Foster, Family and Consumer Sciences graduate student; and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

    Recall Alert: EpiPens, Aldi’s Peas, Hunt’s Chili Kits

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) releases food and drug recall notices to help consumers stay informed. Sign up to receive email notifications of Recalls, Market Withdrawals, and Safety Alerts.

    EpiPens Recalled

    Mylan is recalling EpiPens (epinephrine injections) and EpiPen Jrs due to potential defects. A defective EpiPen may require unnecessary force in order to deploy medicine, or in some cases, the device may altogether fail. Epinephrine, the drug injected by an EpiPen, is first aid treatment for an individual undergoing anaphylactic shock, or life-threatening allergic reaction.

    The recall was originally limited to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and Japan but has since expanded to include the United States. Outside of the United Stated, there have been two cases reported of individuals whose EpiPens failed during emergency situations. Both patients, fortunately, were able to use alternate EpiPens in order to obtain treatment.

    Both faulty EpiPens came from the same lot, but additional lots are now being recalled out of precaution. The potentially defective EpiPens were distributed between December 2015 and July 2016. Recalled lots in the United States are listed below.

    faulty epipens recalled

    The image below indicated where to find the lot number on an EpiPen package.

    recalling epipens

    Patients carrying recalled EpiPens are encouraged to return them for replacements, free of charge. The manufacturing company can also be contacted via 800-796-9526 or customer.service@mylan.com.

    Aldi’s Peas Recalled

    Just under two thousand packages of Season’s Choice Frozen Peas are being voluntarily recalled due to potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Listeria infections can be serious or even fatal in young children, the elderly, or other persons with weakened immune systems. Symptoms include high fever, nausea, stiffness, severe headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Pregnant women who are infected with Listeria may suffer miscarriages or stillbirths.

    The recalled frozen peas were distributed to Aldi Stores in Florida, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and West Virginia. Identify the recalled product by its label code:

    Season’s Choice Sweet Peas, Net Weight 16 oz (1 LB) 454 g UPC code 041498164294

    Code: DC17038 PLAB6176 BEST BY 08 2018

    DC27038 PLAB6176 BEST BY 08 2018

    DC27038 BNAF7286 BEST BY 08 2018

    DC37038 BNAF7286 BEST BY 08 2018

    DC47038 PLAC6216 BEST BY 08 2018

    DC57038 PLAC6216 BEST BY 08 2018

    Consumers may returned recalled products to place of purchase for full refunds.

    Hunt’s Chili Kit Recalled

    On April 2, Conagra initiated a voluntary recall of its Hunt’s Chili Kits due to potential Salmonella contamination of the chili seasoning packets. Symptoms of a Salmonella infection include abdominal cramps, fever, and diarrhea. An otherwise healthy individual may recover without treatment, although some cases of severe diarrhea lead to hospitalization. Salmonella infections pose the greatest risk to infants, the elderly, and others with weakened immune systems.

    The recalled chili kits were distributed in retail stores and online, as well as through military commissaries, across the United States. Identify a recalled product via UPC and Manufacturing Lot Codes.

    Item Description UPC MFG/Lot Code Best By Date
    HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534619500 Apr 04, 2018
    HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534622200 May 01, 2018
    HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534619600 April 5, 2018

    The below picture demonstrates where to find the information that can be used to identify a recalled chili product.

    hunts recall