Loneliness Affects Your Health

The Following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 26, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

loneliness affects your health

Socialization Affects Your Health

Just as we need food and water to survive, we also need meaningful social relationships and connections. We are wired for social contact, so going without it increases the risks to jeopardize our overall health, well-being, and quality of life. While it is okay to feel lonely and to be alone on occasion, chronic loneliness can cause serious health concerns. Researchers continue to demonstrate how important meaningful relationships with others are to our mental, emotional, and physical health.

If not addressed, loneliness can lead to social isolation, physical and mental decline, and depression. Recent studies have shown that social isolation can also lead to a number of negative health impacts including poor sleeping patterns, a disrupted immune system, poor nutrition, destruction of arteries, and high blood pressure. When the need for socialization is not met, it can also negatively affect learning, memory, and motivation.

Loneliness can occur at any age and can be a normal feeling — especially after a break-up, a move to a new location, loss of a loved one, or exclusion from a group. On the other hand, chronic loneliness (feeling lonely, isolated, or lacking in close connections for an extended period of time) can bring about discomfort and distress, including feeling sad, empty, isolated, distanced from others, deprived, and filled with longing. These feelings lead to many problems. Children and teens, for example, are more likely to adopt an outcast status, have problems in or drop out of school, or even become delinquent. Lonely adults are at greater risk of alcoholism and depression. Those living alone are at greater risk of suicide.

Loneliness is particularly prevalent among older adults. As we age, our social circle shrinks, which makes it more difficult to have meaningful interactions with others. According to a 2013 AARP study, the percentage of adults who say they are lonely has doubled from 20 percent in the 1980s to 40 percent today. About 30 percent of adults older than 65 live alone. That number jumps to 50 percent in adults over 85.

loneliness negatively affects health

If you are experiencing loneliness, you are not alone, and you don’t have to be as there are many ways to increase your social interactions. Consider the following tips:

  • Find a cause to be passionate about and donate your time. There are many community organizations in Oldham County in need of volunteers: Humane Society of Oldham County, Oldham County Red Cross, Crossroads Pregnancy Center, Dare to Care Food Bank, and many more. Not only will you get to interact with others, but you will also get satisfaction from giving back.
  • Don’t miss opportunities to interact with your family. Attend family events like reunions and weddings. If you have grandkids who live close, consider attending one of their extracurricular activities, such as a ballgame or a dance recital. The socialization will positively impact your health and also encourage the child to practice and try harder.
  • Take up a hobby. Find something you are passionate about or learn more about something you already enjoy. Consider joining a group that shares your interests, such as a writing group at the Oldham County Public Library or the knitters at Friends and Fiber in La Grange.

The Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service offers many opportunities for social interaction including Extension Homemaker clubs, Master Gardener programs, Master Clothing Volunteers, Master Cattleman, 4-H volunteer opportunities, and all kinds of classes on various subjects. Find out more about local extension events by contacting us via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can visit oldham.ca.uky.edu or facebook.com/OldhamCo to learn more about upcoming events.

loneliness affects your health

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Hosier, Associate Extension Professor for Family Life Education, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

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Celebrate KY Homemakers Week

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 12, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

2017 KEHA Week

oldham county homemakers

Celebrate Extension Homemakers during KEHA Week

Kentucky Extension Homemakers Association Week is October 8 through 14, and the state’s more than 850 clubs are celebrating their accomplishments from the past year.

Extension Homemakers are firmly rooted in community service with more than 14,000 members contributing more than 300,000 volunteer hours for Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service-sponsored activities.

olsham county homemakers

KEHA members are huge supporters of higher education and youth. During the 2015-2016 fiscal year, the organization awarded more than $58,000 in college scholarships to deserving students and gave more than $14,000 in 4-H Camp scholarships. Extension Homemakers also volunteered more than 90,000 hours to support youth development activities across the state.

The organization supports several international causes including the Kentucky Academy in Ghana. During the past nine years, Extension Homemakers have helped the academy, which is a kindergarten based in Adjeikrom, Ghana, with various projects. These efforts include building upgrades, new furniture, and a new water well. Most recently, the group has raised money to fund the construction of a library in the village of Adjeikrom.

oldham county homemakers

Outreach efforts extend to local communities too. In the 2015-2016 fiscal year, Oldham County Extension Homemakers volunteered 20,866 hours to our community. Charitable projects included making lap blankets for the VA Hospital, sewing hats for cancer patients and premature babies, donating time and money to local food banks, and making and delivering holiday cards to nursing home residents. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also raise money for ovarian cancer research, Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

Joining Extension Homemakers is a great way to get involved with and give back to your community. If you are interested in learning more, contact the Oldham County Extension office via (502) 222-9453.

oldham county homemakers

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Kim Henken, Director of Communications and Strategic Partnerships for the School of Human Environmental Sciences, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

2017 Oldham County Fair Winners

The following article printed in the August 17, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

4-H Fair Winners

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the 4-H department:

Maggie Anderson Tyler Bickert Kora Birchmeier
Addison Blake Katherine Carter Riley Dant
Blake Fogle AJ Furnish Sarah Griffin
Emily Harris Rachel Harris Ryan Hawkins
Benny Hernandez Beth Huffman Ethan Jasinski
Katelynn Jasinski Lindsay Jasinski Zachary Jasinski
Bailey Johnson Riely Johnson Sean Johnson
Keirsten Kennedy Kendall Kennedy Molly Logsdon
Jasmine McCaslin Maria Murphy Carrie Olds
Ella Olds Jaylynn Oldson Hannah Santos
Manuel Solis Trent Schmitt Ayden Speth
Sarah Spradlin Ty Westerman April York

The following Oldham County 4-H’ers were division champions and will proceed to the Kentucky State Fair:

Maggie Anderson Kora Birchmeier Katherine Carter
Sarah Griffin Rachel Harris Ryan Hawkins
Beth Huffman Ethan Jasinski Katelynn Jasinski
Lindsay Jasinski Zachary Jasinski Riely Johnson
Keirsten Kennedy Kendall Kennedy Molly Logsdon
Carrie Olds Hannah Santos

Agriculture Fair Winners

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Youth Division of the Agriculture Department:

Thomas Blackburn Melody Hardin Sarah Hardin
Emma Lane Lauren Potts Porter Salisbury
Casey Smith

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Adult Division of the Agriculture Department:

Alice Ashlock Buck Ashlock Bob Fishback
Ashley Haselton Christy Husband LeAnne Smith

In the Agriculture Department, Sarah Hardin was the Youth Division Champion, and Bob Fishback was the Adult Division Champion for the second year in a row. Bob Fishback’s herbs won Best in Show in the Adult Division. Lauren Potts’s pumpkin won Best of Show: Youth.

Floral Fair Winners

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Youth Division of the Floral Department:

Kaylee Blackburn Sarah Griffin Sarah Hardin
Ashley Potts Lauren Potts Paisley Salisbury

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Adult Division of the Floral Department:

Susan Lancaster LeAnne Smith

HOME & FAMILY ARTS Fair Winners

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Junior Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Mary Elizabeth Broecker Weslee Bodenheimer Wyatt Bodenheimer
Ethan Jasinski Katelynn Jasinski Lindsay Jasinski
Zachary Jasinski Lucy Pike Lucy Ray

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Open Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Sarah Bulgrin Lucille Cash Kathy Cursh-Gray
Todd Driskell Patti Hardesty Becky Mings
Tara Paine LeAnne Smith Lauren State
Russell Thomas, Sr. Candy Thompson Diane Weis

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Senior Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Mary Bramblett Jo Anne Crouch Joanne Ferguson
Kathy Cursh-Gray Harvey Gilley Linda Jensen
Susan Lancaster Barb Lynch Ronnie Meier
Michael Slaughter Sharon Stotler Candy Thompson
Diane Weis

In the Home & Family Arts Department, Ronnie Meier won Best of Show Quilt, an award sponsored by the Oldham County Log Cabin Quilters, for the third year in a row. Mary Elizabeth Broecker is the Junior Division Champion with eight ribbons and $28 in premiums. With seven blue ribbons, Becky Mings is the Open Division Champion. Susan Lancaster is the Senior Division Champion with 26 entries and $140 premium money.

PHOTOGRAPHY Fair Winners

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Junior Division of the Photography Department:

Grace Baker Mary Elizabeth Broecker Ethan Jasinski
Katelynn Jasinski Lindsay Jasinski Zachary Jasinski
Lauren Potts

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Adult Division of the Photography Department:

Toni Hoehle Susan Lancaster Hannah Ray
Cheryl Satterly Angela Thomas

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Broccoli a Great, Nutritious Option at Farmer’s Market

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the June 22, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Farmers Market Broccoli

With June comes the start of summer and an abundance of fresh produce available at farmers markets across Oldham County. One in-season produce offering that you may not necessarily associate with late spring and early summer is broccoli.

Broccoli actually has two growing seasons in Kentucky. Kentucky growers began harvesting their first crop in May and will continue to harvest through early July. The second season ends with a harvest in the late fall.

You can steam, boil and microwave broccoli – or even enjoy it raw. As you will see in the Plate It up! Kentucky Proud recipe that follows, it can give a flavorful and healthy twist to popular summer dishes.

Broccoli is one of the most nutrient-dense vegetables that you can eat. It is a good source of vitamins A and C, beta carotene, folic acid and phytochemicals. Due to their high antioxidant levels, researchers recommend you consume several servings of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (like cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts) several times a week. A diet high in antioxidants can reduce your risk of developing some forms of cancer as well as heart disease.

When shopping at the market, choose broccoli that has tender, young, dark-green stalks with tightly closed buds. If you purchase about one and one-half pounds of broccoli, you’ll get four, one-half cup servings. Store broccoli, unwashed, in the refrigerator for no more than three to five days in a perforated plastic bag. Wash just before preparing to maintain its texture and prevent mold from forming.

Contact the Oldham County Extension office for more information on ways to prepare in-season produce and local farmers market offerings. Find Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud recipes online, or contact the extension office for recipe cards.

healthy broccoli recipe

Broccoli Grape Pasta Salad

Healthy Recipe

Broccoli Salad Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup diced pecans
  • 8 ounces whole grain pasta (bow tie or other)
  • 5 slices turkey bacon
  • 2 cups seedless red grapes
  • 1 pound fresh broccoli
  • 3/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup diced red onion
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar

healthy broccoli grapes recipe

Broccoli Salad Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake pecans in a single layer in a shallow pan for five to seven minutes or until lightly toasted and fragrant, stirring halfway through.
  2. Prepare eight ounces of pasta according to package directions.
  3. Cook bacon according to package directions. Cool and crumble into small pieces.
  4. Cut the broccoli florets from the stems and separate florets into small pieces using the tip of a paring knife.
  5. Slice two cups of grapes into halves.
  6. Whisk together mayonnaise, honey, diced red onion and vinegar in a large mixing bowl.
  7. Add broccoli, cooked pasta and grapes; stir to coat.
  8. Cover and chill for 30 minutes. Stir in bacon crumbles and diced pecans, just before serving.

Nutritional Analysis: 160 calories, 7 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 5 mg cholesterol, 125 mg sodium, 24 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 4 g protein.

Yield: 16, 1/2-cup servings

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status or physical or mental disability.

Written by Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Assistant Extension Professor. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

At the Farmers Market: Asparagus

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the May 4, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Farmers Market Asparagus

Oldham County farmers markets are opening for the 2017 season. Asparagus is one of the early-season crops many of our local vendors will have available.

Harvested during April and May in Kentucky, asparagus is a nutrient-dense vegetable that you can eat raw, lightly boiled, steamed, stir-fried or grilled. It can be seasoned with herbs, butter, or Parmesan cheese to enhance its flavor. As you will see in the Plate It Up Kentucky Proud recipe below, it can also be an integral ingredient in many dishes.

Asparagus is a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, and fiber. A half-cup serving of fresh asparagus (about six stalks) contains 22 calories, 2 grams of protein, and 4 grams of carbohydrates.

When shopping for asparagus at the market, look for bright green stalks with tightly closed tips. The most tender ones are apple green in color with purple-tinged tips. A pound of asparagus will make four, one-half cup servings. It will keep a week or two in the refrigerator when kept upright with cut ends resting in water. You can also store asparagus in the refrigerator with cut ends wrapped in wet paper towels inside a plastic bag.

Contact Chris Duncan, Oldham County Family and Consumer Science Agent, at (502) 222-9453 or crivera@uky.edu for more information on ways to prepare in-season produce. On the Oldham County Extension website, you can find more healthy recipes or find a market near you.

healthy asparagus recipe

Asparagus Ham Quiche

Healthy Recipe

Yield: 16 slices

Asparagus Ham Quiche Ingredients

  • 1 pound fresh asparagus, trimmed and cut into half-inch pieces
  • 1 cup finely chopped ham
  • 1 small finely chopped onion
  • 2 (8-inch) unbaked pie shells
  • 1 egg white, slightly beaten
  • 2 cups shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 container (5.3 ounces) plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup 1 percent milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Asparagus Ham Quiche Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place asparagus in a steamer over 1 inch of boiling water and cover. Cook until tender but still firm, about four to six minutes. Drain and cool.

Place ham and onion in a nonstick skillet and cook over medium heat until lightly browned. Brush pie shells with beaten egg white. Spoon the ham, onion and asparagus into pie shells, dividing evenly between the two shells. Sprinkle one cup shredded cheese over the mixture in each shell.

In a separate bowl, beat together eggs, yogurt, milk, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Pour egg mixture over the top of the cheese, dividing evenly between the two shells.

Bake uncovered in a 400-degree preheated oven until firm 25-30 minutes. Allow to cool approximately 20 minutes before cutting.

Nutritional Analysis: 200 calories, 11 g fat, 4.5 g saturated fat, 65 mg cholesterol, 370 mg sodium, 14 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 3 g sugars, 10 g protein

healthy asparagus recipe

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Assistant Extension Professor in Dietetics and Human Nutrition. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Cook Flavorful Food With Fewer Calories

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the March 2, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

healthy cooking recipes

More Flavor, Fewer Calories

Looking for ways to make fewer calories deliver more nutrition? Search for recipes that help you trim energy intake. Make sure to read all available nutritional information. You can even find phone apps that help you count calories and track other nutritional information such as vitamins, fiber, and sugar.

Sometimes, you may need to use a little of “the real thing” to get the flavor you crave. Start by reducing fats and sugars rather than cutting them out completely. Here are some tips for cooking to add flavor without too much fat or added sugar:

  • For some foods, like cheese or salad dressings, try reduced-fat instead of fat-free products. You may want to try using a ratio of two-thirds reduced-fat product to one-third real thing.
  • Try using one-third less sugar in your recipes or using a sugar substitute like stevia.
  • Make your sweet treats count. Cook with fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy ingredients in muffins and in desserts like banana pudding or sweet potato pie.
  • Add whole-wheat, soy, flax, or oatmeal to pancakes for more flavor and fiber.
  • Try roasting or smoking vegetables to give them more flavor without added calories.
  • Herbs and spices give foods distinctive flavors. When food is flavorful we may be satisfied with a smaller amount. Experiment with herbs like marjoram, thyme, or rosemary to see what tastes good to you. Buy herbs and spices on sale to stock your shelf with many possible ways to flavor your foods.
  • Garlic, onions, and celery add a lot of flavor with few calories.
  • When cooking a rice or pasta side dish, add frozen spinach or canned mushrooms to cut calories and add flavor.

healthy low calorie snack

Try new recipes and experiment with flavor profiles! Check out this low calorie, low sodium Apple Coleslaw recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 apples (1 red, 1 green), cored and chopped
  • 1/2 head of green cabbage, shredded (3 cups)
  • 1 cup shredded carrots
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 3/4 cup low fat vanilla yogurt
  • Optional: raisins or grapes

Directions:

  1. Mix yogurt and honey in a large bowl.
  2. Add other ingredients, mix together lightly.

Makes 12 servings.
Serving size: 1/2 cup
Cost per recipe: $3.38
Cost per serving: $0.28
Nutrition facts per serving: 45 calories, 0 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 25 mg sodium, 10 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 7 g sugar, 1 g protein

healthy apple coleslaw recipe

Find more healthy recipes like this on the Oldham County Extension website.

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Janet Mullins, Extension Specialist for Food and Nutrition, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Recipe from Debra Cotterill, Director of Kentucky Extension Nutrition Education Program.

FAFSA Changes Effective Soon

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the September 22, 2016 edition of the Oldham Era.

complete the fafsa

Upcoming FAFSA Changes

FAFSA Changes Effective in 2016

If you or your child has gone to college, chances are you’ve filled out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, better known as FAFSA. Changes to this form announced by the Obama administration in 2015 are about to go into effect for the 2017-2018 school year.

One of the biggest changes to the application is how soon you can fill it out. You can submit the form for the 2017-2018 school year beginning Oct. 1, 2016. This is several months sooner than in previous years. With the filing deadline remaining June 30, 2017, it will give you more time to fill out the form, explore your financial aid options, and meet state and school deadlines for aid. Remember, Kentucky is a first-come, first-served state when it comes to financial aid awards. You will want to get your FAFSA in as soon as possible if you plan on receiving state aid. Once the money is gone, no other awards will be given.

A second major change is that you now will submit older tax data to the FAFSA. In previous years, college-bound students and their families have had to estimate their income on the FAFSA and update it once they file their taxes. This change does away with the estimation and updating. For the 2017-2018 year, you will submit your 2015 income and taxes. Since these taxes have already been filed, you may be able to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool to automatically place your 2015 tax information into your FAFSA.

completing the fafsa

The Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority has great information for college-bound individuals and links to useful tools like the FAFSA4caster, which can give you an estimate of your net cost for college now. Visit their website for more information.

Oldham County Community Scholarships is a local non-profit organization that provides financial aid to Oldham County students. Community members and businesses contribute to these scholarships. Since 2004, Oldham County Community Scholarships has awarded more than $800,000 to high school students pursuing college. For more information, visit the organization online at www.occs-ky.org.

Extension offices often offer financial education programs for people of all ages. The Oldham County Extension Homemakers, for example, offer two $700 scholarships each year. Oldham County Homemakers, their children, and their grandchildren are eligible to apply. These scholarships can be used for any educational purpose. For more information, contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service at (502) 222-9453.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

Written by Jennifer Hunter, Family Financial Management Extension Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

2016 Oldham County Fair Winners

The following article printed in the August 18 edition of the Oldham Era.

Agriculture Department

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Youth Division of the Agriculture Department:

Zac Clute Andrew Fraim Gillian Gattenby
Sarah Griffin Melody Hardin Sarah Hardin
Ashley Potts Lauren Potts Porter Salisbury

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Adult Division of the Agriculture Department:

Buck Ashlock Andy Brooking Nanette Dietmeyer
Bob Fishback Elizabeth Griffin Ashley Haselton
David Ragsdale LeAnne Smith

In the Agriculture Department, Melody Hardin was the Youth Division Champion, and Bob Fishback was the Adult Division Champion. Bob Fishback’s jalapeno peppers also won Best in Show in the Adult Division. Sarah Hardin’s sweet bell peppers won Best of Show: Youth.

4-H Department

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the 4-H department:

Samantha Aguilar Hannah Anderson Maggie Anderson
Noah Anderson Rebekah Anderson Peyton Ash
Will Barber Charlie Beckmann Ryan Bivens
Reagan Cheatham Camille Clickner Jack Coleman
Lilly Crook Rebekah Degnan Heather Denny
Alex Dunkle Kailey Greenwell Gage Griffin
Sarah Griffin Ryan Hawkins Katelyn Head
Isabelle Heady Benny Hernandez Beth Huffman
Abigail Hutchens Ethan Jasinski Katelynn Jasinski
Lindsay Jasinski Zach Jasinski Carmen Kelly
Rylee Kelly Keirsten Kennedy Emmett King
Anna Laverty Drew Laverty Molly Logsdon
Connor Mackenzie Ruby Mason Adelle Minor
Olivia Minor Taylor Morrison Adam Mouchrani
Carrie Olds Ella Olds Carter Onan
Izzy Perez Keira Puckett Audrey Roberts
Brianna Ross Savannah Satterly Cameron Schulte
Coral Schulte Isabella Timmons Cortney Wells
Hannah Wilkins Jessica Wilkins Zach Wilkins
Lexie Willett Ryleyann Willett Karmen Woods
Joey Woosley April York

The following were division champions and will proceed to the Kentucky State Fair:

Hannah Anderson Noah Anderson Rebekah Anderson
Will Barber Rebekah Degnan Lilly Crook
Kailey Greenwell Sarah Griffin Ryan Hawkins
Beth Huffman Abby Hutchens Ethan Jasinski
Katelynn Jasinski Lindsay Jasinski Zach Jasinski
Keirsten Kennedy Emmett King Anna Laverty
Drew Laverty Molly Logsdon Ruby Mason
Adelle Minor Olivia Minor Carrie Olds
Ella Olds Izzy Perez Keira Puckett
Audrey Roberts Brianna Ross Cameron Schulte
Coral Schulte Karmen Woods

Home & Family Arts Department

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Junior Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Gage Birchmeier Weslee Bodenheimer Mary Elizabeth Broecker
Breann Crouch-Edgar Sarah Griffin Emily Holliday
Ethan Jasinski Lucy Pike Eliza Stewart

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Open Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Karen Bergstrom John Black Kathleen Cursh-Gray
Emily Diamond Jolene Griffin Traci Jones
Susan Lancaster Rebecca Mings Tara Paine
Deborah Patton David Ragsdale Elizabeth Rosenberg
LeAnne Smith Lauren State

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Senior Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Mary Broecker Betty Doggendorf Chris Duncan
Larry Duncan Judie Faltz Joanne Ferguson
Jolene Griffin Susan Lancaster Barbara Lynch
Ronnie Meier Angela Morris Carolyn Nowatka
Carol Orlove Dorothy Servino Diane “Candy” Thompson

In the Home & Family Arts Department, Ronnie Meier’s quilt won Best of Show, an award sponsored by the Oldham County Log Cabin Quilters, for the second year in a row. Mary Elizabeth Broecker is the Junior Division Champion with five blue ribbons and $30 in premiums. Elizabeth Rosenberg is the Open Division Champion. Her thirteen entries totaled $72 in premiums. Barbara Lynch is the Senior Division Champion with seven entries and $34 premium money.

Breastfeeding Basics

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the July 28, 2016 edition of the Oldham Era.

Breastfeeding Basics

Breastfeeding is a natural part of being a mother, but unless you or a family member have done it, it may be one that you know little to nothing about. August 1-7 is recognized as World Breastfeeding Week is August 1st through 7th, the entire month of August being National Breastfeeding Month.

Breastfeeding benefits both babies and their mothers. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, breastfed babies have lower risks of asthma, childhood leukemia, childhood obesity, ear infections, eczema, diarrhea and vomiting, lower respiratory infections, sudden infant death syndrome, and Type 2 diabetes. Mothers who breastfeed their children have lower risks of developing Type 2 diabetes, certain types of breast cancer, and ovarian cancer.

While breastfeeding is a natural process, it does not come without challenges, worries, and issues. If you are pregnant, now is a great time to discuss your desire to breastfeed with your doctor. Depending on your health conditions and medications, it may not be a viable option.

If you are a mother who is having trouble breastfeeding, talk to your health care provider to get help. Your doctor may also be able to refer you to a local professional who is trained to address breastfeeding concerns and provide tips. In many areas, moms can join local breastfeeding support groups. The La Leche League International also hosts an online forum for breastfeeding mothers to share their stories and concerns with others.

A common worry for mothers is the public perception of breastfeeding in public places. In 2006, however, Kentucky passed a law allowing mothers to breastfeed in any public place where they and their children would otherwise be allowed; and businesses, municipalities, or other people should not interfere, restrict, or prohibit them from doing so.

Remember, breastfeeding is a personal decision. All moms deserve support regardless of how they decide to feed their infants. They should not feel guilty if they cannot or choose not to breastfeed.

Call the Oldham County Health Department at (502) 222-3516 for further information on breastfeeding. The Oldham County Extension Office also provides information about healthy living. Contact us at (502) 222-9453, or visit us online.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Cheap Summer Vacations

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the May 12, 2016 edition of the Oldham Era.

Budget Trip Tips

family staycation

Summer Travel on a Budget

Warm, sunny days often inspire hitting the road to discover new things. But the dream of getting away may seem impossible to some of us when the costs of traveling – including food, lodging and entertainment – are piled on top of everyday living expenses.
inexpensive family vacation
These tips may make it easier for you to get away without breaking the bank.

  1. Shorten the length of your stay. Everyone would love to stay on the beach for a week, but for some, that may not be economically feasible. Instead of canceling your trip, look at your budget and see what you can afford. You may find that you save several hundred dollars just by shortening your stay by a few days.
  2. Choose off-season vacation spots. While summer is the peak season for most places, destinations that do the majority of their business during the winter months like ski resorts may offer discounts during the off-season. You won’t be able to ski, but you can enjoy nature, restaurants, and tourist attractions, not to mention fewer crowds.
  3. Look for last minute deals or specials if you are flexible with your dates. Airlines and hotels often offer discounts to fill empty seats and vacant rooms. Make sure you book with a reputable company when searching the Internet for deals.
  4. Save money by eating in. Food can be one of the biggest expenses of a vacation next to lodging. Consider bringing food or purchasing it at a local grocery store instead of dining out for every meal. Breakfast and lunch may be easy to do, if you have refrigerator access or are okay with grab-n-go food. Access to a kitchen in your room or vacation rental could help you prepare a couple of home-cooked meals for your family.
  5. vacation at home

  6. Have a staycation. Become a tourist in your own city or region. In Oldham County, we have attractions like Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve, Oldham County Farm Tours, and historic downtown La Grange. You can also contact the Oldham County Tourism Commission toll-free at 1-800-813-9953 for more information on free or low-cost summer events offered in the county.
  7. Set a budget and follow it. Make sure everyone in your family knows and agrees to the daily spending allowance. Families can plan each day’s events based on their budget.
  8. Start a vacation savings account for next year. Like Christmas savings accounts, some banks offer vacation club savings accounts. These allow you to spread the cost of the vacation over an entire year instead of being hit with a lump payment at once.

cheap family vacation
For more information on topics related to family financial management, contact Family & Consumer Science Agent Chris Duncan at the Oldham County Cooperative Extension office.

home vacation

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

Source: Jennifer Hunter, Extension Specialist for Family Financial Management. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.