Oldham County 4-H Excels at State Horse Contest

The following 4-H Youth Development article printed in the Oldham Era.

2018 Kentucky State 4-H Horse Contest

On June 7 and 8, eleven 4-H’ers represented Oldham County at the 2018 Kentucky State 4-H Horse Contest in Lexington.

Oldham County 4-H’s Junior Horse Bowl team (Peyton Ash, Sydney Ash, Emily Altsman, and Carrie Olds) won first place. In the individual competition, Peyton earned third, and Carrie took fifth place.

ky 4-h horse contest champs

In the Hippology contest, 4-H’ers test their equine veterinary and management knowledge. The Oldham County 4-H Junior Hippology team was made up of Harper Ash, Peyton Ash, Sydney Cobb, and Carrie Olds. The team placed first in the written section, first in stations, and first in judging, taking first place in the overall competition. Sydney took first in individual performance, Carrie second, and Peyton third.

The Junior Horse Judging team placed third in team performance, fourth in team halter, and second overall. Peyton Ash, Caecilia Isenhart, Freya Isenhart, and Carrie Olds made up the Junior Horse Judging team. Caecilia also won fifth place in performance and first overall. In the senior division, Beth Huffman placed eighth in individual performance.

Oldham County 4-H’ers also took home several awards in the art competitions. In black and white photography, Ida Isenhart earned first place, Caecilia Isenhart took third, and Freya Isenhart came in tenth. Ella Olds won third place for her posed and candid photos as well as third place in art kits and patterns. Carrie Olds took third placed in original art. In equipment, Harper Ash won fifth place. Peyton Ash’s junior presentation earned second place, and her sewing project won third.

Oldham County is proud of the fantastic efforts displayed by our 4-H’ers!

Written by Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reviewed by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent.

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How to Set Fitness Goals

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the June 7, 2018 edition of the Oldham Era.

exercise for good health

Fitness Beginnings: Fitness Goal Setting

Made a decision to get healthier but unsure where to start? Adding physical activity to your routine is a great way to improve your mind, mood, and body.

Adults need 150 minutes of physical activity each week. Don’t be overwhelmed! You can split this up into 10-minute segments of physical activity throughout the week. Make an appointment with yourself every day (and keep it!) to ensure you meet this goal.

Now that you are determined to increase your physical activity, think about your health goals and how increasing your movement will help you achieve them. Remember to set SMART goals, or ones that are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Timely.

A specific goal should clearly spell out what you want to achieve, where it will take place, and the time period. An example of a specific goal is walking for at least 30 minutes, in your neighborhood, five days a week.

Once you’ve decided on specifics, figure out how you will measure your progress. Think about amounts of activity and the length of time.

fitness goal setting

Often, we want immediate success. That’s where the attainable part of SMART goal setting comes in. An attainable goal is realistic and something you can actually do. As much as we would all like lose 20 pounds in two weeks, the chances are highly unlikely that it will happen. In fact, most people trying to lose weight should aim to lose about 1-2 pounds per week for healthy and sustainable weight loss. Keep that in mind as you are setting your fitness goals.

The next step is for you to examine the importance of the goal relevant to where you are in your life. For example, you may not necessarily be interested in weight loss right now but may instead choose to add physical activity to reduce stress or improve your mood.

The last part of SMART is timeliness. This is when you set time to complete your goal, whether it is short or long term. A short-term goal may be to lose 15 pounds within two months, whereas a long-term goal could be to maintain that weight loss for an entire year.

For more information on physical activity goal setting, contact the Oldham County Extension office.

hike to get fit

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Natalie Jones, University of Kentucky Physical Activity Program Coordinator, and Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Save on Winter Heating Costs

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the February 1, 2018 edition of the Oldham Era.

tips to help save money

Tips to Save on Winter Heating Costs

With the winter we have had thus far, chances are you’ve seen at least one or two high heating bills. While home heating costs can put a strain on your wallet during the winter, you can do certain things to save money on these expenses while still keeping your home warm.

Sunlight, even in the winter, is a great way to add natural, free warmth to your home. Open your blinds and curtains during the day, particularly on south-facing walls as they get the most exposure to the sun. As the sun sets, close them to help trap in the warmth.

Leaks in your windows and doors can allow warm air to escape and cold air to come inside. Check your home for air leaks, and fill gaps and cracks with caulk or insulation. Air can also escape through your chimney. When you are not using it for warmth, close your fireplace’s damper to keep in warmth. Use area rugs on tile, wood or laminate floors to help trap in heat.

Turn your thermostat down when you leave the house for work or other extended periods of time. This keeps you from paying for heat you are not using. When you return, set the thermostat to the lowest comfortable setting. For every degree you lower the thermostat, you can save about 3 percent on your heating costs. Wear layers of clothing inside, and add extra blankets to your bed or to help you stay warmer at a lower temperature.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Alex Elswick, Extension Associate for Family Resource Management.

Stay Warm For Your Health

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the December 28, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Keep Warm This Winter

As the mercury drops on the thermometer, remember to stay warm both indoors and outdoors for your health. This is particularly true for older adults as they tend to lose body heat faster than younger adults.

Not staying warm enough can lead to hypothermia. This condition occurs when your body temperature drops too low. For older adults, that number is around 95 degrees F. Hypothermia can lead to many other health problems including heart attack, kidney problems and liver damage. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than half of all hypothermia-related deaths are in adults 65 years and older.

You may not notice early signs of hypothermia. They include cold hands and feet, a puffy or swollen face, pale skin, confusion, anger and sleepiness. Later signs of hypothermia include trouble walking or clumsiness; stiff, jerky arm and leg movements; slow heartbeat; slow, shallow breaths and blacking out. Shivering can be an early sign of hypothermia but is not a guarantee. In fact, some people experiencing hypothermia do not shiver at all.

Being outside during cold weather or even inside a chilly house can cause hypothermia. Try to stay inside on chilly days, especially those that are also windy and damp. If you cannot stay in, remember to dress in loose fitting layers to keep yourself warm and wear a hat and scarf as you tend to lose a lot of body heat from your head and neck. Keep your thermostat set at 68 degrees F or higher to make sure you stay warm enough inside during the winter. Remember to also wear warm clothes while inside and use blankets for additional warmth. If you are worried about heating costs, close off doors and vents in unused rooms. Keep the basement door closed at all times, and put rolled up towels by doors to block drafts.

stay warm for your health

Medical conditions including thyroid disease, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, memory loss and arthritis can make it harder for you to stay warm. Some prescription and over-the-counter medications can also affect body heat. Talk to your doctor about ways to stay warm if you have these conditions and before you start or stop any medication.

If you think yourself or a loved one is experiencing hypothermia, seek immediate medical attention. For more information on weather-related issues or healthy aging, visit the Oldham County Extension office, located at 1815 North Highway 393 in Buckner.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Kostelic, UK Extension Specialist in Family Life Education.

Extension Builds Healthy Kentuckians

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the November 9, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

extension builds healthy Kentuckians

FCS Extension Builds Strong, Healthy Kentuckians

In Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Extension, we help individuals develop the skills they need to improve quality of life for themselves and their families. We offer a variety of educational programs throughout the year, including cooking and nutrition classes, sewing workshops, financial stability talks, and much more. In the past programming year, we reached more than 1.6 million Kentuckians.

These programs have made a meaningful impact across the state. Our Truth and Consequences Program, which focuses on the realities of substance abuse, has changed the lives of young Kentuckians. In a recent survey, more than 400 of them reported that they know of peers who no longer engage in substance abuse because of the program.

tips for getting healthy

Extension offers health-related programs for all age groups that focus on eating healthy and increasing physical activity. Due to these efforts, more than 12,000 Kentuckians made a lifestyle change to improve their health. FCS Extension agents also work closely with local farmers markets to promote fresh produce consumption. By conducting Plate It Up Kentucky Proud food demonstrations and offering recipe cards during the markets, agents increased Kentucky farmers market sales by more than $17,000. Oldham County FCS Agent Chris Duncan partnered with Oldham County Fiscal Court to bring food demonstrations and nutrition tips to Oldham County TV. “Cooking With Chris” can be found online by visiting www.oldhamcounty.net/oldham-county-tv.

Educating low-income families on the benefits of healthier eating and buying fresh foods resulted in redemption of more than $61,000 in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; Women, Infants and Children; or senior benefits at the state’s farmers markets. To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget.

Oldham County Extension also brings nutrition education to inmates in the substance abuse program at Roederer Correctional. Lessons focus on preparing the men for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Through various career preparation programs, we spread knowledge that helps Kentuckians attain employment or find a more fulfilling job. In the past year, more than 43,000 people used practical living skills learned through FCS Extension to advance their education or employment.

We are home to a vibrant group of Extension Homemakers. These members engage in numerous outreach projects to better their communities and Kentucky. One such project is the ovarian cancer screening fundraising program. Each year, Extension Homemakers contribute to this UK Markey Cancer Center program, which provides free ovarian cancer screenings to Kentucky women. Since fundraising began 40 years ago, Extension Homemakers have given $1.4 million to that effort. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also contribute to Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

For more information on local Family and Consumer Sciences programs, contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can also visit us online at oldham.ca.uky.edu.

extension food safety classes

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Jennifer Hunter, Interim Assistant Director of Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Loneliness Affects Your Health

The Following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 26, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

loneliness affects your health

Socialization Affects Your Health

Just as we need food and water to survive, we also need meaningful social relationships and connections. We are wired for social contact, so going without it increases the risks to jeopardize our overall health, well-being, and quality of life. While it is okay to feel lonely and to be alone on occasion, chronic loneliness can cause serious health concerns. Researchers continue to demonstrate how important meaningful relationships with others are to our mental, emotional, and physical health.

If not addressed, loneliness can lead to social isolation, physical and mental decline, and depression. Recent studies have shown that social isolation can also lead to a number of negative health impacts including poor sleeping patterns, a disrupted immune system, poor nutrition, destruction of arteries, and high blood pressure. When the need for socialization is not met, it can also negatively affect learning, memory, and motivation.

Loneliness can occur at any age and can be a normal feeling — especially after a break-up, a move to a new location, loss of a loved one, or exclusion from a group. On the other hand, chronic loneliness (feeling lonely, isolated, or lacking in close connections for an extended period of time) can bring about discomfort and distress, including feeling sad, empty, isolated, distanced from others, deprived, and filled with longing. These feelings lead to many problems. Children and teens, for example, are more likely to adopt an outcast status, have problems in or drop out of school, or even become delinquent. Lonely adults are at greater risk of alcoholism and depression. Those living alone are at greater risk of suicide.

Loneliness is particularly prevalent among older adults. As we age, our social circle shrinks, which makes it more difficult to have meaningful interactions with others. According to a 2013 AARP study, the percentage of adults who say they are lonely has doubled from 20 percent in the 1980s to 40 percent today. About 30 percent of adults older than 65 live alone. That number jumps to 50 percent in adults over 85.

loneliness negatively affects health

If you are experiencing loneliness, you are not alone, and you don’t have to be as there are many ways to increase your social interactions. Consider the following tips:

  • Find a cause to be passionate about and donate your time. There are many community organizations in Oldham County in need of volunteers: Humane Society of Oldham County, Oldham County Red Cross, Crossroads Pregnancy Center, Dare to Care Food Bank, and many more. Not only will you get to interact with others, but you will also get satisfaction from giving back.
  • Don’t miss opportunities to interact with your family. Attend family events like reunions and weddings. If you have grandkids who live close, consider attending one of their extracurricular activities, such as a ballgame or a dance recital. The socialization will positively impact your health and also encourage the child to practice and try harder.
  • Take up a hobby. Find something you are passionate about or learn more about something you already enjoy. Consider joining a group that shares your interests, such as a writing group at the Oldham County Public Library or the knitters at Friends and Fiber in La Grange.

The Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service offers many opportunities for social interaction including Extension Homemaker clubs, Master Gardener programs, Master Clothing Volunteers, Master Cattleman, 4-H volunteer opportunities, and all kinds of classes on various subjects. Find out more about local extension events by contacting us via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can visit oldham.ca.uky.edu or facebook.com/OldhamCo to learn more about upcoming events.

loneliness affects your health

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Hosier, Associate Extension Professor for Family Life Education, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Celebrate KY Homemakers Week

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 12, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

2017 KEHA Week

oldham county homemakers

Celebrate Extension Homemakers during KEHA Week

Kentucky Extension Homemakers Association Week is October 8 through 14, and the state’s more than 850 clubs are celebrating their accomplishments from the past year.

Extension Homemakers are firmly rooted in community service with more than 14,000 members contributing more than 300,000 volunteer hours for Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service-sponsored activities.

olsham county homemakers

KEHA members are huge supporters of higher education and youth. During the 2015-2016 fiscal year, the organization awarded more than $58,000 in college scholarships to deserving students and gave more than $14,000 in 4-H Camp scholarships. Extension Homemakers also volunteered more than 90,000 hours to support youth development activities across the state.

The organization supports several international causes including the Kentucky Academy in Ghana. During the past nine years, Extension Homemakers have helped the academy, which is a kindergarten based in Adjeikrom, Ghana, with various projects. These efforts include building upgrades, new furniture, and a new water well. Most recently, the group has raised money to fund the construction of a library in the village of Adjeikrom.

oldham county homemakers

Outreach efforts extend to local communities too. In the 2015-2016 fiscal year, Oldham County Extension Homemakers volunteered 20,866 hours to our community. Charitable projects included making lap blankets for the VA Hospital, sewing hats for cancer patients and premature babies, donating time and money to local food banks, and making and delivering holiday cards to nursing home residents. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also raise money for ovarian cancer research, Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

Joining Extension Homemakers is a great way to get involved with and give back to your community. If you are interested in learning more, contact the Oldham County Extension office via (502) 222-9453.

oldham county homemakers

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Kim Henken, Director of Communications and Strategic Partnerships for the School of Human Environmental Sciences, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

2017 Oldham County Fair Winners

The following article printed in the August 17, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

4-H Fair Winners

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the 4-H department:

Maggie Anderson Tyler Bickert Kora Birchmeier
Addison Blake Katherine Carter Riley Dant
Blake Fogle AJ Furnish Sarah Griffin
Emily Harris Rachel Harris Ryan Hawkins
Benny Hernandez Beth Huffman Ethan Jasinski
Katelynn Jasinski Lindsay Jasinski Zachary Jasinski
Bailey Johnson Riely Johnson Sean Johnson
Keirsten Kennedy Kendall Kennedy Molly Logsdon
Jasmine McCaslin Maria Murphy Carrie Olds
Ella Olds Jaylynn Oldson Hannah Santos
Manuel Solis Trent Schmitt Ayden Speth
Sarah Spradlin Ty Westerman April York

The following Oldham County 4-H’ers were division champions and will proceed to the Kentucky State Fair:

Maggie Anderson Kora Birchmeier Katherine Carter
Sarah Griffin Rachel Harris Ryan Hawkins
Beth Huffman Ethan Jasinski Katelynn Jasinski
Lindsay Jasinski Zachary Jasinski Riely Johnson
Keirsten Kennedy Kendall Kennedy Molly Logsdon
Carrie Olds Hannah Santos

Agriculture Fair Winners

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Youth Division of the Agriculture Department:

Thomas Blackburn Melody Hardin Sarah Hardin
Emma Lane Lauren Potts Porter Salisbury
Casey Smith

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Adult Division of the Agriculture Department:

Alice Ashlock Buck Ashlock Bob Fishback
Ashley Haselton Christy Husband LeAnne Smith

In the Agriculture Department, Sarah Hardin was the Youth Division Champion, and Bob Fishback was the Adult Division Champion for the second year in a row. Bob Fishback’s herbs won Best in Show in the Adult Division. Lauren Potts’s pumpkin won Best of Show: Youth.

Floral Fair Winners

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Youth Division of the Floral Department:

Kaylee Blackburn Sarah Griffin Sarah Hardin
Ashley Potts Lauren Potts Paisley Salisbury

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Adult Division of the Floral Department:

Susan Lancaster LeAnne Smith

HOME & FAMILY ARTS Fair Winners

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Junior Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Mary Elizabeth Broecker Weslee Bodenheimer Wyatt Bodenheimer
Ethan Jasinski Katelynn Jasinski Lindsay Jasinski
Zachary Jasinski Lucy Pike Lucy Ray

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Open Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Sarah Bulgrin Lucille Cash Kathy Cursh-Gray
Todd Driskell Patti Hardesty Becky Mings
Tara Paine LeAnne Smith Lauren State
Russell Thomas, Sr. Candy Thompson Diane Weis

The following received one or more blue ribbons in the Senior Division of the Home & Family Arts Department:

Mary Bramblett Jo Anne Crouch Joanne Ferguson
Kathy Cursh-Gray Harvey Gilley Linda Jensen
Susan Lancaster Barb Lynch Ronnie Meier
Michael Slaughter Sharon Stotler Candy Thompson
Diane Weis

In the Home & Family Arts Department, Ronnie Meier won Best of Show Quilt, an award sponsored by the Oldham County Log Cabin Quilters, for the third year in a row. Mary Elizabeth Broecker is the Junior Division Champion with eight ribbons and $28 in premiums. With seven blue ribbons, Becky Mings is the Open Division Champion. Susan Lancaster is the Senior Division Champion with 26 entries and $140 premium money.

PHOTOGRAPHY Fair Winners

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Junior Division of the Photography Department:

Grace Baker Mary Elizabeth Broecker Ethan Jasinski
Katelynn Jasinski Lindsay Jasinski Zachary Jasinski
Lauren Potts

The following individuals received one or more blue ribbons in the Adult Division of the Photography Department:

Toni Hoehle Susan Lancaster Hannah Ray
Cheryl Satterly Angela Thomas

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Broccoli a Great, Nutritious Option at Farmer’s Market

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the June 22, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Farmers Market Broccoli

With June comes the start of summer and an abundance of fresh produce available at farmers markets across Oldham County. One in-season produce offering that you may not necessarily associate with late spring and early summer is broccoli.

Broccoli actually has two growing seasons in Kentucky. Kentucky growers began harvesting their first crop in May and will continue to harvest through early July. The second season ends with a harvest in the late fall.

You can steam, boil and microwave broccoli – or even enjoy it raw. As you will see in the Plate It up! Kentucky Proud recipe that follows, it can give a flavorful and healthy twist to popular summer dishes.

Broccoli is one of the most nutrient-dense vegetables that you can eat. It is a good source of vitamins A and C, beta carotene, folic acid and phytochemicals. Due to their high antioxidant levels, researchers recommend you consume several servings of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (like cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts) several times a week. A diet high in antioxidants can reduce your risk of developing some forms of cancer as well as heart disease.

When shopping at the market, choose broccoli that has tender, young, dark-green stalks with tightly closed buds. If you purchase about one and one-half pounds of broccoli, you’ll get four, one-half cup servings. Store broccoli, unwashed, in the refrigerator for no more than three to five days in a perforated plastic bag. Wash just before preparing to maintain its texture and prevent mold from forming.

Contact the Oldham County Extension office for more information on ways to prepare in-season produce and local farmers market offerings. Find Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud recipes online, or contact the extension office for recipe cards.

healthy broccoli recipe

Broccoli Grape Pasta Salad

Healthy Recipe

Broccoli Salad Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup diced pecans
  • 8 ounces whole grain pasta (bow tie or other)
  • 5 slices turkey bacon
  • 2 cups seedless red grapes
  • 1 pound fresh broccoli
  • 3/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup diced red onion
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar

healthy broccoli grapes recipe

Broccoli Salad Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake pecans in a single layer in a shallow pan for five to seven minutes or until lightly toasted and fragrant, stirring halfway through.
  2. Prepare eight ounces of pasta according to package directions.
  3. Cook bacon according to package directions. Cool and crumble into small pieces.
  4. Cut the broccoli florets from the stems and separate florets into small pieces using the tip of a paring knife.
  5. Slice two cups of grapes into halves.
  6. Whisk together mayonnaise, honey, diced red onion and vinegar in a large mixing bowl.
  7. Add broccoli, cooked pasta and grapes; stir to coat.
  8. Cover and chill for 30 minutes. Stir in bacon crumbles and diced pecans, just before serving.

Nutritional Analysis: 160 calories, 7 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 5 mg cholesterol, 125 mg sodium, 24 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 4 g protein.

Yield: 16, 1/2-cup servings

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status or physical or mental disability.

Written by Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Assistant Extension Professor. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

At the Farmers Market: Asparagus

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the May 4, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Farmers Market Asparagus

Oldham County farmers markets are opening for the 2017 season. Asparagus is one of the early-season crops many of our local vendors will have available.

Harvested during April and May in Kentucky, asparagus is a nutrient-dense vegetable that you can eat raw, lightly boiled, steamed, stir-fried or grilled. It can be seasoned with herbs, butter, or Parmesan cheese to enhance its flavor. As you will see in the Plate It Up Kentucky Proud recipe below, it can also be an integral ingredient in many dishes.

Asparagus is a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, and fiber. A half-cup serving of fresh asparagus (about six stalks) contains 22 calories, 2 grams of protein, and 4 grams of carbohydrates.

When shopping for asparagus at the market, look for bright green stalks with tightly closed tips. The most tender ones are apple green in color with purple-tinged tips. A pound of asparagus will make four, one-half cup servings. It will keep a week or two in the refrigerator when kept upright with cut ends resting in water. You can also store asparagus in the refrigerator with cut ends wrapped in wet paper towels inside a plastic bag.

Contact Chris Duncan, Oldham County Family and Consumer Science Agent, at (502) 222-9453 or crivera@uky.edu for more information on ways to prepare in-season produce. On the Oldham County Extension website, you can find more healthy recipes or find a market near you.

healthy asparagus recipe

Asparagus Ham Quiche

Healthy Recipe

Yield: 16 slices

Asparagus Ham Quiche Ingredients

  • 1 pound fresh asparagus, trimmed and cut into half-inch pieces
  • 1 cup finely chopped ham
  • 1 small finely chopped onion
  • 2 (8-inch) unbaked pie shells
  • 1 egg white, slightly beaten
  • 2 cups shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 container (5.3 ounces) plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup 1 percent milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Asparagus Ham Quiche Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place asparagus in a steamer over 1 inch of boiling water and cover. Cook until tender but still firm, about four to six minutes. Drain and cool.

Place ham and onion in a nonstick skillet and cook over medium heat until lightly browned. Brush pie shells with beaten egg white. Spoon the ham, onion and asparagus into pie shells, dividing evenly between the two shells. Sprinkle one cup shredded cheese over the mixture in each shell.

In a separate bowl, beat together eggs, yogurt, milk, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Pour egg mixture over the top of the cheese, dividing evenly between the two shells.

Bake uncovered in a 400-degree preheated oven until firm 25-30 minutes. Allow to cool approximately 20 minutes before cutting.

Nutritional Analysis: 200 calories, 11 g fat, 4.5 g saturated fat, 65 mg cholesterol, 370 mg sodium, 14 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 3 g sugars, 10 g protein

healthy asparagus recipe

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Assistant Extension Professor in Dietetics and Human Nutrition. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.