Classic Kentucky Recipes

The University Press of Kentucky

Schmid Cover for blogWith the weather warming up, it’s almost time to bring out the grill and cook up some homemade barbecue. There’s nothing like getting a few friends together and fixing up an old family recipe, but if you’re looking for something new to spice up your table, look no further than Albert W. A. Schmid’s upcoming book, Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon: A Kentucky Culinary Trinity.

Burgoo, barbecue, and bourbon have long been recognized as the trinity of good taste in Kentucky. Drawing from past and present sources from across Kentucky, Schmid offers both new and forgotten versions of some favorite regional dishes while sharing the storied traditions that surround them. The following recipes are just a small taste of the culinary journey that Schmid has to offer:


If you don’t have a grill or simply want a faster way to make barbecue after a long day at work, this recipe for…

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Healthy Summer Squash Pizza Recipe

Summer Squash Pizza

Yield: 4 servings

Crust Ingredients: 1/2 tablespoon rapid rise yeast • 1 tablespoon sugar • 1/2 cup warm water • 1/2-1 cup whole wheat flour • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Topping Ingredients: 2 yellow summer squash, thinly sliced • 1 cup thinly sliced onion • 1 green pepper, thinly sliced • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary • Salt and pepper to taste • 3 tablespoons olive oil • 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese

Directions:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place sliced squash, onion and pepper in roasting pan. Sprinkle with rosemary, salt, pepper and 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Toss to coat. Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until onions are lightly brown and squash and peppers are tender. Set aside. Increase oven temperature to 450 degrees F. In a medium mixing bowl, dissolve yeast and sugar in warm water. Let yeast proof, about 10 minutes. Stir in 1/2 cup flour, salt and oil. Mix until smooth then rest for 5 minutes. Add additional flour as needed to be able turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Roll into flat 1/4 inch thick crust. Place crust onto a baking sheet. Bake 5 minutes to set crust. Remove from oven and distribute vegetable mixture on crust. Bake an additional 10 minutes or until crust is firm, being careful not to burn. Remove from oven, sprinkle with cheese and remaining tablespoon olive oil. Cut into quarters and serve.

Nutritional Analysis: 310 calories, 19 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 340 mg sodium, 33 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 7 g sugars, 9 g protein

Recipe from Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud. The Kentucky Proud Project is a cooperation between County Extension Agents for Family and Consumer Sciences and Dietetics and Human Nutrition Students at the University of Kentucky.

10-Minute Bean Soup Recipe

healthy fast bean soup recipe

Soup Ingredients: 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 teaspoon minced garlic • 1/4 cup onion, finely chopped • 2 (15.8 ounce) cans of great northern beans, rinsed and drained • 1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes with basil, garlic, and oregano • 1 (14 ounce) can low-sodium vegetable or chicken broth • 4 cups kale, torn into small pieces • 1 tablespoon lemon juice • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions:

  1. In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium heat and saute garlic and onion for 3 minutes or until onion is tender.
  2. Add beans, tomatoes, and broth to saucepan. Stir and simmer for 5 minutes. Add kale and cook until tender, for about 2 minutes.
  3. Mix in lemon juice and Parmesan cheese just before serving. Optional, garnish with finely chopped fresh basil or dried basil.

Recipe Variations:

  • Cooked dried beans may be substituted for canned beans. Using prepared dry beans in place of canned will reduce sodium in this dish.
  • If you can’t find diced tomatoes with basil, garlic, and oregano, use regular diced tomatoes and add dried versions of these seasonings.
  • Opt for vegetable broth instead of chicken broth to make a vegetarian 10-minute bean soup. Make the soup vegan by leaving out the Parmesan cheese.

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Makes 4 servings.
Serving size: 1/4 of recipe
Cost per recipe: $6.52
Cost per serving: $1.63

Nutrition facts per serving: 400 calories, 8 g total fat, 2.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat, 10 mg cholesterol, 500 mg sodium, 62 g carbohydrate, 15 g fiber, 4 g sugar, 24 g protein, 140% Daily Value of vitamin A, 160% Daily Value of vitamin C, 40% Daily Value of calcium, 30% Daily Value of iron

Source: Caroline Durr, Area Nutrition Agent for Kentucky Nutrition Education Program, University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service

Take a Hike in Oldham County

National Take a Hike Day

hike in oldham county

Free Hiking Trails

The CDC recommends that adults shoot for 150 minutes of exercise per week. Take advantage of National Take a Hike Day on November 17, and find a new place to exercise! From public parks to nature preserves, beautiful Oldham County is home to a variety of green spaces.

Briar Hill Park

The hiking trail at Briar Hill Park is a natural path through the woods that takes you past a creek. Walkers and cyclists are welcome on the paved path that surrounds the playground area. In addition to walking trails, this 52-acre park offers picnic shelters, restrooms, basketball court, sand volleyball court, and tennis courts. A mountain biking trail is also under reconstruction, according to the Kentucky Mountain Bike Association.

Briar Hill Park is located at 7400 East Orchard Grass Boulevard in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve

Over nine miles of trails crisscross the 170 acres of Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve. Oldham County Master Gardeners tend the two-acre Woodland Garden, found along the forested trails. The nature preserve is also home to a frog pond, Nature Center, small waterfall, and Harmony Park.

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve is located at 12501 Harmony Landing Road in Goshen.

oldham county hiking trails

Morgan Conversation Park

More than 200 acres of woodlands await you at the Morgan Conservation Park. Oldham County Parks and Recreation have announced that a shelter is coming soon.

“Morgan Conservation Park is a hidden gem with several trails (some steep, but worth it), good sized creek that begs exploration, small waterfalls, an old barn, ponds, a glade, meadows, and an old family burial site.”
Oldham Family Fun

Morgan Conservation Park is located at 1200 Kentucky 524 in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Peggy E. Baker Park

Home of South Oldham Little League, Peggy Baker Park offers 25 acres of open, green space for many kinds of activities. Other amenities include a playground, basketball court, picnic shelter, and restrooms.

Peggy E. Baker Park is located at 6887 Route 2858 in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Pewee Valley Central Park

Tucked behind the Little Colonel Playhouse, Pewee Valley Central Park is a beautiful green space right in the center of town. The city council originally envisioned this project, and passionate volunteers expedited the transformation of the space. Walkers can enjoy a short, paved, walking trail complete with benches, a small bridge over a fish pond, and covered pavilion. A red caboose is a short walk away from the park.

Central Park is located at 105 Central Avenue in Pewee Valley.

Wendell Moore Park

Covering 107 acres, Wendell Moore Park is a multi-functional venue. Here you’ll find the John W. Black Community Center, offices of Oldham County Parks and Recreation, Aquatic Center, and Elizabeth Cleland Cauley Dog Park. Wendell Moore is also the home of Oldham County Youth Football. Amenities include walking trails, picnic shelters, restrooms, playgrounds, horseshoe pits, disc golf courses, tennis courts, two softball fields with a concession area, and a lake for fishing from either the bank or docks.

Paved walking trails traverse the park’s gently rolling hills, offering multiple distances for walkers and cyclists.

Wendell Moore Park is located at 1551 North Highway 393 in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Westport Park

This five-acre park sits on the Ohio River in the northern end of Oldham County. A large green space surrounds the playground. Westport Park also offers a picnic shelter, restrooms, basketball court, horse pits, fishing dock, boat ramp, and boat dock. This is the home of the annual River Daze Festival, sponsored by Friends of Westport.

Westport Park is located at 6617 Main Street in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Wilborn Park

Found on the L&N Lake, this 30-acre park offers a paved walking trail situated around a playground and restrooms. Natural trails cross wooden bridges back and forth across the lake which is open to fisherman. Wilborn Park also has a covered pavilion.

Wilborn Park is located near 201 Lakeshore Drive in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

More Oldham County Hiking

Brownsboro Alliance

Membership is required to access the Brownsboro Alliance trail system. Hikers and horseback riders can enjoy over 14 miles of trails through Oldham County farm- and woodlands. Parking is available by the trailhead on Foxhollow Farm.

The Brownsboro Alliance Trailhead is located at the intersection of Highways 329 & 1694 in Crestwood.

Oldham County Greenways

Oldham County Greenways is a non-profit project working to establish an Interurban Greenway that will connect La Grange and Pewee Valley. Completed projects include pathways and the disc golf course at Wendell Moore Park and a three-mile trail along Commerce Parkway in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens

Formerly the site of the Klein Farm and Nursery, Yew Dell Yew Dell boasts fantastic gardens and a stone castle. This historical site is also home to three woodland ponds and more than a mile of hiking trails. A printable hiking trail map is available on Yew Dell’s website. An admission fee helps support continued preservation efforts.

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens is located at 6220 Old LaGrange Road in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Photos by Lauren State Fernandez; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Ann Stroth, Studio VII inc.

Yummy Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

Yummy Sweet Potato Casserole

Yield: 12, 1/2 cup servings

Casserole Ingredients: 6 medium sweet potatoes • 1/4 cup maple syrup • 2 tablespoons brown sugar • 2 eggs • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 3/4 cup low-fat vanilla Greek yogurt • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract • 1 tablespoon cinnamon

Topping Ingredients: 1/2 cup brown sugar • 1/2 cup ground rolled oats • 1 tablespoon maple syrup • 3 tablespoons melted butter • 1/4 teaspoon salt • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon • 1/2 cup chopped pecans

Directions:
Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Peel sweet potatoes and cut into 1-inch cubes. Place sweet potato cubes in a medium saucepan and cover with water. Cook over medium-high heat until tender. Drain and mash. In a large bowl, mix together mashed potatoes, maple syrup, brown sugar, eggs, salt, yogurt, vanilla and cinnamon. Blend until smooth. Pour into a 13-by-9 inch baking dish. Topping: In a medium bowl, mix the brown sugar and oats. Add in syrup, melted butter, salt and cinnamon; blend until mixture is coarse. Stir in pecans. Sprinkle over sweet potato mixture. Bake 30 minutes, or until topping is lightly browned.

Nutritional Analysis: 190 calories, 7 g fat, 2.5 g saturated fat, 10 mg cholesterol, 190 mg sodium, 31 g carbohydrate, 20 g sugars, 4 g protein

Recipe from Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud. The Kentucky Proud Project is a cooperation between County Extension Agents for Family and Consumer Sciences and Dietetics and Human Nutrition Students at the University of Kentucky.

Grandparent and Adult Grandchildren Relationships

grandparent relationship

Grandparent and Adult Grandchildren Relationships Mutually Beneficial

One of the many benefits of living longer is grandparents get to see their grandchildren become adults. While scientists have conducted much research about the benefits and effects of positive relationships between grandparents and their young grandchildren, until recently little research had been conducted about the relationships between grandparents and adult grandchildren. Recent studies show that positive relationships between these two groups are mutually beneficial.

A study conducted by Boston College researchers showed that close emotional bonds between grandparents and their adult grandchildren is associated with fewer symptoms of depression in both generations. Researchers also found that grandparents who helped out their grandchildren and received assistance from their grandchildren had the fewest symptoms of depression. Grandparents who received support but could not reciprocate, had the most depressive symptoms.

Another study, led by a University of Texas researcher, looked at the frequency of grandparents offering support to their adult grandchildren. Researchers found that listening, emotional support, and companionship were the most common things grandparents gave to their adult grandchildren. The study also found that grandparents were a greater means of support to their grandchildren when the child’s parent was experiencing life problems or was unemployed. Grandparents listening, advice, and companionship with their adult grandchildren ran hand-in-hand with parents providing these same types of support to the child.

strong relationship with grandparents

As we age, it’s important not to forget the strong bonds that formed years ago as grandparents and young grandchildren. Everyone gets busy, but it’s important for us to take time to enjoy these relationships as much as possible. Whether over the phone or in person, continuing these relationships can be helpful to both generations in ways neither can imagine.

For more information on raising strong families, contact Chris Duncan, Family & Consumer Science Agent at the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service, via (502) 222-9453 or crivera@uky.edu.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by David Weisenhorn, Senior Extension Specialist, and Amy Kostelic, Associate Extension Professor. Edited by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension State Assistant.

Kentucky Burgoo Recipe

Jonathan’s Kentucky Burgoo

Servings: 8-12

This modern burgoo recipe comes from Lexington chef Jonathan Lundy and is very much in the spirit of the original dish, while taking into account modern tastes.

1 tablespoon olive oil • 2 cups diced onion • 1 cup diced celery • 1 cup peeled, diced carrots • 1/2 cup diced green peppers • 2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic • 1/4 cup teaspoon dried sage • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme • 12-ounce bottle of Kentucky ale or dark ale • 1/2 gallon brown beef stock • 2 cups braised bison brisket, diced • 2 cups roasted pork loin, diced • 2 cups roasted beef tenderloin, diced • 1/2 cup fresh roasted corn, cut off the cob • 1/2 cup frozen soybeans or lima beans • 1/4 cup chopped canned tomatoes • Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

In a large soup pot, preheat the oil on high heat and sauté the onions, celery, carrots, and peppers for 3-4 minutes. Add the mushrooms, garlic and dried herbs. Sauté for 3-4 minutes more. Add Kentucky ale. Reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for about 5 minutes to allow alcohol to cook off. Add remainder of ingredients and simmer for about 20 minutes before serving.

Can be made 2–3 days ahead of time and reheated.

Recipe from “Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon.”

Fun Summer Activities for Teens

Challenge Your Teen’s Brain over Summer Vacation

While many adolescents look forward to summer vacation, it is not uncommon for them to quickly grow bored. Bored teens often turn to television and electronics. With a little encouragement, however, a teen can transform a bored brain into one that is healthy and active, and in turn, create a most memorable summer vacation.

Activities that can keep your teen happy, fit, and healthy include:

  • Spend time as a family. Go on vacation or create “stay-cations” to explore your own community or state.
  • Hold family/neighborhood Olympics. Create a day (or weekend) of fun physical and mental activities that can played on teams. Have contests and medals.
  • Go for a hike, bike ride, or find other ways to be physically active. Explore new trails, terrain, or a nature center. Oldham County parks offer trails, picnic shelters, basketball courts, horseshoe pits, disc golf, and more!

ky tree park

  • Hold a family board game or card night.
  • Plan an outdoor movie night in the backyard.
  • Make food fun. Play “chopped” kitchen or “iron chef,” or put each member of the family in charge of planning a menu and making dinner as a family.
    Find new recipes on the Kentucky Proud website.

  • Volunteer as a family and get involved in the community. Soup kitchens, homeless shelters, churches, hospitals, nursing homes, libraries, and humane societies are often looking for help. Community service can provide a teen with a sense of accomplishment and purpose.
    Places to volunteer in Oldham County include Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve, the Humane Society of Oldham County, Mission Crestwood, Yew Dell Botanical Gardens, and more.
  • Start a garden. Use it for pizzas, salad, or flowers. Gardens offer both nutritional and psychological benefits.
  • Plan an event. Planning a party such as a back-to-school barbecue can teach a teen planning, budgeting, and organizing.

Written by Amy F. Hosier, Extension Family Life Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Reference: Witmer, D. (2017). 6 Types of Fun Summer Activities for Teens. Retrieved online May 18, 2017.

Adapting Your Garden As You Age

Tips For The Aging Gardener

Love gardening but afraid your body can no longer physically handle the work? A few simple adjustments can help make the work easier, allowing you to continue enjoying your hobby.

Like an athlete, the gardener develops gardening skills through repeated activities like digging, weeding, mulching, etc. We learn how to use tools to get the job done with the least amount of efforts and the best results.

gardening tips

Through my wife, an occupational therapist, I have learned a lot about adapting physical activities to fit a person’s ability. Her background includes work with children and seniors.

I have been gardening and landscaping since the late 1970s. Following my back surgery in 1995, I discovered the importance of proper lifting, carrying, and digging techniques for gardening. Recommended habits can be modified. Don’t wait for back surgery to take a look at your gardening habits. I still garden and do strenuous work, but I listen to my body and take a break, change my position, or stop when needed. Well, sometimes I go past my limit — but not far — and when I do, I pay more attention to my posture. Staying active is important to maintain endurance, flexibility, and energy.

The Aging Gardener

When we age, endurance is often the first thing to go. We can’t work as long. We feel weak, unable to lift and move plants like we used to, and familiar tasks take longer to complete. If you’re having these experiences, it might be necessary to reevaluate the size of the garden or change its maintenance requirements. Reduce the overall maintenance of deep perennial beds, for example, by making them narrowing and backing them with shrubs.

The loss of flexibility is also one of the first signs of aging. An injury or development of arthritis are among several things that can cause reduced flexibility. This limits our ability to maneuver in the garden: getting up and down, twisting or changing position while pulling weeds or picking flowers, and cleaning up dead leaves. Of course, gardening does help us maintain flexibility. Reduced flexibility needs to be considered when we decide what needs to be changed to make it easier to maneuver in the garden.

Additional limiting changes include poor balance and persistent back and joint pain. Once these changes start, gardening becomes more of a challenge, so modifying your garden as you develop it could help in the long run.

Adapting Your Garden As You Age

Let’s look at the garden. What is the size and layout of your garden? Is your garden large with numerous perennial plantings and border gardens, or is it smaller, including just the area surrounding your house with maybe a small vegetable garden? The style, size, and area of your garden will determine the approach needed when making modifications so that you can enjoy gardening again.

Note that annual and perennial plantings need a lot of maintenance because of their constant change and growth rate. Lawns, trees, and shrubs also require maintenance but not as often as flower beds.

We don’t want to limit our garden, build expensive raised beds, and, most of all, reduce the size of our garden once it is established because there are always new plants to try. We should look ahead. Look at what has recently changed in your ability to maintain your garden. What are your immediate limitations? Decide what you will be able to handle and still enjoy gardening. Will you be able to have someone available to help (maybe a family member or young gardening enthusiast) to keep your garden as it is?

gardening as you age

Gardens are a collective of plants that we desired to grow at one point or another. Some, though attractive, are not your favorite. Select those plants that are your favorites and reconsider how to handle the rest. Changes based on a landscape plan can be made all at once or over a period of years. If you decide to do the work yourself, start with your most labor-intensive space. Look for plants that need less attention. Reduce the overall maintenance of deep perennial beds by making them narrower then backing them with shrubs. Another solution might be creating a pollinator garden that requires minimum upkeep and can be mown off once a year.

Reduce reaching distance and amount of leaning forward to pull weeds or spread mulch. If you can only access a bed from one side, ensure it is no wider than two feet. Beds accessible from both sides can be four feet in width.

To make the work easier, use quality tools and keep them clean and sharp. A rusty shovel is more difficult to dig with because the soil will stick to it more. A sharp hoe will cut through weeds easier than a dull one. Consider automatic watering and semi-automatic watering systems for gardening to reduce the amount of hand watering. Soaker hoses and single drip emitters are two options.

Making Your Garden More Accessible

Once you have decided what changes to make to your garden, you can make them yourself with family help or hire a landscaper to install them for you.

The design of large gardens will need to provide easy access to all the plants with wide, level walkways on both sides of four-foot-wide beds. Create shaded areas in the garden using trellises, gazebos, and small trees so you can get out of the sun a while. Benches provide a comfortable place to sit and rest.

Walkways should be wide and level enough to accommodate a wheelchair. Turf, smooth recessed stepping stones, or paving stones make a good surface for wheelchair access. Mulch and loose gravel are often hard to push through and can also become a slipping hazard.

Smaller garden areas can be created using a number of large containers grouped together or as single planters.

Container Gardening

container gardening

Container gardening can reducing your gardening stress, and the many different and attractive containers available add interesting focal points to your garden.

You can also turn just about anything into a container garden. From teapots to milk jugs, wooden dressers to wine barrels, let your creativity run wild!

Raised Bed Gardening

Consider installing raised beds that reduce bending over by allowing you to work in a standing or seated position. Standing, you may be able to maintain a three-foot-deep bed, while two feet is manageable if seated.

raised bed gardening

Raised beds can be a very attractive part of a landscape, defining walkways and providing a more formal appearance. Height often varies from six inches to three feet tall. Raised beds can be constructed in many styles using a wide variety of materials, including treated wood, concrete blocks, stone, and more. Various shapes and curves can be included to help blend the raised garden into your existing landscape, making it both attractive and functional.

Vertical Gardening

Unique garden features like vertical gardening with wall planters and trellises allow you to work while standing up. You can buy a premade trellis or build one yourself. Pots can be stacked or arranged on a riser. Like container gardening, vertical gardening is an opportunity to get creative in the garden.

vertical gardening ideas

Growing vegetables using vertical trellises reduces bending and picking. Many vegetables grow well when trellised. Cucumbers, beans, squash, and melons can all climb the traditional store-bought garden trellis.

Straw Bale Gardening

Another simplified gardening method that lifts your garden, making it more accessible, is straw bale gardening. This gardening method can be incredibly productive. It also cuts out all of the digging and cultivating that can be hard on the body. Straw bale gardening does, however, require several weeks of setup. A good guidebook is Straw Bale Gardens – The Breakthrough Method for Growing Vegetables Anywhere, Earlier and With No Weeding by Joel Karsten.

Reduce Your Garden Stress

Every garden and every gardener is unique. Consider your body type and abilities when adapting your garden as you age. Understand that your garden is limited by your physical abilities and personal interests as well as the location of the garden itself.

  • Reduce the overall size of the garden
  • Trade out high maintenance annuals and perennials for lower maintenance shrubs and trees
  • Reduce the amount of reaching, leaning, and bending with raised bed and vertical gardens
  • Garden small with container gardening
  • Keep your tools in good shape so they’re easier to work with

With these tips in mind, make changes that allow you to continue enjoying your gardening hobby without the stress of a high-maintenance landscape.

Written by Michael Boice, Oldham County Extension Horticulture Assistant. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Reference: National AgrAbility Project, ‘Arthritis and Gardening: A Guide for Home Gardeners and Small-Scale Producers.’ Purdue University, 2016.