Get Ready for 4-H Competitions

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

OC 4-H'ers Compete at State Shoot

Qualifying for 4-H Competitive Events

Attention: All 4-H members must be registered with Oldham County 4-H by April 15th, 2018 in order to qualify to compete in any 4-H events. This requirement applies to all 4-H competitions including Horse Show, Horse Contest, Dog Shows, and Oldham County 4-H Fair.

4-H’ers who would like to participate in any competitive 4-H horse event (this includes 4-H horse shows) must complete six hours of instructional training taught or approved by their 4-H certified horse club leader. Please meet with your leader now to ensure you will have your completed and documented hours of instruction prior to April 15th. Documentation must accompany your registration or show paperwork.

OC 4-H Fair

Oldham County Fair

The 2018 Oldham County Fair is scheduled for July 31 through August 4. 4-H projects will be entered on July 26 at the Oldham County Extension office and available for pickup on August 4th at the Oldham County Fairgrounds. Don’t forget: to be eligible to exhibit projects in the 4-H categories during the county fair, youth must be a registered 4-H member by April 15th. Watch for an e-mail notification about the fair catalog and the NEW online fair registration instructions.

Oldham County 4-H Dog Program

4-H State Dog Camp

Take your dog to camp. 4-H Dog Camp is the perfect opportunity for 4-H members to work with their dogs one-on-one and in group instruction situations. Dog Camp will be held at J.M. Feltner 4-H Camp on May 18 through 20. Contact the Extension Office at (502) 222-9453 if you would like to receive registration information when available.


Opportunites for 4-H’ers and Volunteers

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

4-H Speech Program Builds Confidence

Public speaking is one of Americans’ biggest fears. 4-H presents the opportunity for youth to conquer this fear at a young age by participating in the public speaking program. By learning public speaking skills, youth will have the confidence, organizational skills and composure to become the influential leaders of tomorrow.

The important thing is for young people to give 4-H public speaking a try. The earlier they begin the program and the longer they stick with it, the stronger their public speaking skills will be. Youth can deliver speeches on any topic they find interesting. As they look for more information on the topic, they develop valuable research skills. They also learn organizational skills by composing the speech and giving it the proper structure. Finally, they must use creative techniques to get the audience’s attention.

Competition begins at the club level qualifying for the county competition on March 26th. County winners advance to a district tournament on April 14th, and district winners advance to a state tournament, held in July at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Judges evaluate the presentation and the speaker’s ability to clearly deliver a message. It’s not too late to get involved in a 4-H speech program! Call (502) 222-9453 for details.

HELP! We need judges for the Communication Competitions on March 26 and April 14. If you are interested in volunteering to judge a speech or demonstration contest, please contact Kelly Woods at (502) 222-9453. We need your help to make this a rewarding experience for our 4-H’ers!

backyard chickens 101

Got Chickens?

If your family is interested in keeping chickens, your first step should be attending the “Chickens 101” workshop. The first session on March 1 focuses on Breed Selection, Chick Care, Housing and Predator Control. Get the rundown on Health and Nutrition at the second session on March 8. Please call (502) 222-9453 or email to register.

Oldham County Extension would like to organize a 4-H Poultry Club. If your child wants to join or you are interested in leading the club, please contact Kelly Woods via (502) 222-9453 or

oc 4h reality store

Volunteer at the 4-H Reality Store

South Oldham High School 4-H Reality Store will be held on Friday, April 20th. We need volunteers to make this event possible. Contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Office via (502) 222-9453 or if you can help out!

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent.

Oldham County 4-H Summer Fun

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

oc 4h camp

Join Us on Planet 4-H

Oldham County 4-H Camp signups are underway! Join us from July 16 through 20 at Lake Cumberland, as we make history by filling the camp with Oldham County campers. Check out our camp promotion featuring our campers online at Applications for campers and adult volunteers are also available on our website.

See you at camp!

oc 4h camp

Teen Conference is Around the Corner – Mark Your Calendar!

Oldham County 4-H teens, if you haven’t attended Teen Conference, you’re missing out! 4-H Teen Conference is for those who have graduated from the eighth grade through the age of 19. Participants select tracks, college visits, tours, workshops, and issues seminars. The conference will be held at the University of Kentucky from June 11 through 14. Financial assistance requests must be submitted to the 4-H Council by April 1 and the complete registration is due April 15th. Contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service for registration materials and additional information.

oldham county 4-h

Important Summer Dates to Note

District Horse Show June 1 – 3
State Horse Judging June 7
State Horse Contest June 7 & 8
Teen Conference June 11 – 14
State Horse Show June 30 – July 7
Kids Cooking Camp June 26 & 27
4-H Camp July 16 – 20

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent, and edited by Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Save on Winter Heating Costs

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the February 1, 2018 edition of the Oldham Era.

tips to help save money

Tips to Save on Winter Heating Costs

With the winter we have had thus far, chances are you’ve seen at least one or two high heating bills. While home heating costs can put a strain on your wallet during the winter, you can do certain things to save money on these expenses while still keeping your home warm.

Sunlight, even in the winter, is a great way to add natural, free warmth to your home. Open your blinds and curtains during the day, particularly on south-facing walls as they get the most exposure to the sun. As the sun sets, close them to help trap in the warmth.

Leaks in your windows and doors can allow warm air to escape and cold air to come inside. Check your home for air leaks, and fill gaps and cracks with caulk or insulation. Air can also escape through your chimney. When you are not using it for warmth, close your fireplace’s damper to keep in warmth. Use area rugs on tile, wood or laminate floors to help trap in heat.

Turn your thermostat down when you leave the house for work or other extended periods of time. This keeps you from paying for heat you are not using. When you return, set the thermostat to the lowest comfortable setting. For every degree you lower the thermostat, you can save about 3 percent on your heating costs. Wear layers of clothing inside, and add extra blankets to your bed or to help you stay warmer at a lower temperature.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Alex Elswick, Extension Associate for Family Resource Management.

10-Minute Bean Soup Recipe

healthy fast bean soup recipe

Soup Ingredients: 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 teaspoon minced garlic • 1/4 cup onion, finely chopped • 2 (15.8 ounce) cans of great northern beans, rinsed and drained • 1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes with basil, garlic, and oregano • 1 (14 ounce) can low-sodium vegetable or chicken broth • 4 cups kale, torn into small pieces • 1 tablespoon lemon juice • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese


  1. In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium heat and saute garlic and onion for 3 minutes or until onion is tender.
  2. Add beans, tomatoes, and broth to saucepan. Stir and simmer for 5 minutes. Add kale and cook until tender, for about 2 minutes.
  3. Mix in lemon juice and Parmesan cheese just before serving. Optional, garnish with finely chopped fresh basil or dried basil.

Recipe Variations:

  • Cooked dried beans may be substituted for canned beans. Using prepared dry beans in place of canned will reduce sodium in this dish.
  • If you can’t find diced tomatoes with basil, garlic, and oregano, use regular diced tomatoes and add dried versions of these seasonings.
  • Opt for vegetable broth instead of chicken broth to make a vegetarian 10-minute bean soup. Make the soup vegan by leaving out the Parmesan cheese.

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Makes 4 servings.
Serving size: 1/4 of recipe
Cost per recipe: $6.52
Cost per serving: $1.63

Nutrition facts per serving: 400 calories, 8 g total fat, 2.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat, 10 mg cholesterol, 500 mg sodium, 62 g carbohydrate, 15 g fiber, 4 g sugar, 24 g protein, 140% Daily Value of vitamin A, 160% Daily Value of vitamin C, 40% Daily Value of calcium, 30% Daily Value of iron

Source: Caroline Durr, Area Nutrition Agent for Kentucky Nutrition Education Program, University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service

Stay Warm For Your Health

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the December 28, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Keep Warm This Winter

As the mercury drops on the thermometer, remember to stay warm both indoors and outdoors for your health. This is particularly true for older adults as they tend to lose body heat faster than younger adults.

Not staying warm enough can lead to hypothermia. This condition occurs when your body temperature drops too low. For older adults, that number is around 95 degrees F. Hypothermia can lead to many other health problems including heart attack, kidney problems and liver damage. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than half of all hypothermia-related deaths are in adults 65 years and older.

You may not notice early signs of hypothermia. They include cold hands and feet, a puffy or swollen face, pale skin, confusion, anger and sleepiness. Later signs of hypothermia include trouble walking or clumsiness; stiff, jerky arm and leg movements; slow heartbeat; slow, shallow breaths and blacking out. Shivering can be an early sign of hypothermia but is not a guarantee. In fact, some people experiencing hypothermia do not shiver at all.

Being outside during cold weather or even inside a chilly house can cause hypothermia. Try to stay inside on chilly days, especially those that are also windy and damp. If you cannot stay in, remember to dress in loose fitting layers to keep yourself warm and wear a hat and scarf as you tend to lose a lot of body heat from your head and neck. Keep your thermostat set at 68 degrees F or higher to make sure you stay warm enough inside during the winter. Remember to also wear warm clothes while inside and use blankets for additional warmth. If you are worried about heating costs, close off doors and vents in unused rooms. Keep the basement door closed at all times, and put rolled up towels by doors to block drafts.

stay warm for your health

Medical conditions including thyroid disease, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, memory loss and arthritis can make it harder for you to stay warm. Some prescription and over-the-counter medications can also affect body heat. Talk to your doctor about ways to stay warm if you have these conditions and before you start or stop any medication.

If you think yourself or a loved one is experiencing hypothermia, seek immediate medical attention. For more information on weather-related issues or healthy aging, visit the Oldham County Extension office, located at 1815 North Highway 393 in Buckner.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Kostelic, UK Extension Specialist in Family Life Education.

Extension Builds Healthy Kentuckians

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the November 9, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

extension builds healthy Kentuckians

FCS Extension Builds Strong, Healthy Kentuckians

In Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Extension, we help individuals develop the skills they need to improve quality of life for themselves and their families. We offer a variety of educational programs throughout the year, including cooking and nutrition classes, sewing workshops, financial stability talks, and much more. In the past programming year, we reached more than 1.6 million Kentuckians.

These programs have made a meaningful impact across the state. Our Truth and Consequences Program, which focuses on the realities of substance abuse, has changed the lives of young Kentuckians. In a recent survey, more than 400 of them reported that they know of peers who no longer engage in substance abuse because of the program.

tips for getting healthy

Extension offers health-related programs for all age groups that focus on eating healthy and increasing physical activity. Due to these efforts, more than 12,000 Kentuckians made a lifestyle change to improve their health. FCS Extension agents also work closely with local farmers markets to promote fresh produce consumption. By conducting Plate It Up Kentucky Proud food demonstrations and offering recipe cards during the markets, agents increased Kentucky farmers market sales by more than $17,000. Oldham County FCS Agent Chris Duncan partnered with Oldham County Fiscal Court to bring food demonstrations and nutrition tips to Oldham County TV. “Cooking With Chris” can be found online by visiting

Educating low-income families on the benefits of healthier eating and buying fresh foods resulted in redemption of more than $61,000 in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; Women, Infants and Children; or senior benefits at the state’s farmers markets. To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget.

Oldham County Extension also brings nutrition education to inmates in the substance abuse program at Roederer Correctional. Lessons focus on preparing the men for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Through various career preparation programs, we spread knowledge that helps Kentuckians attain employment or find a more fulfilling job. In the past year, more than 43,000 people used practical living skills learned through FCS Extension to advance their education or employment.

We are home to a vibrant group of Extension Homemakers. These members engage in numerous outreach projects to better their communities and Kentucky. One such project is the ovarian cancer screening fundraising program. Each year, Extension Homemakers contribute to this UK Markey Cancer Center program, which provides free ovarian cancer screenings to Kentucky women. Since fundraising began 40 years ago, Extension Homemakers have given $1.4 million to that effort. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also contribute to Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

For more information on local Family and Consumer Sciences programs, contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service via (502) 222-9453 or You can also visit us online at

extension food safety classes

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Jennifer Hunter, Interim Assistant Director of Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Supporting Oldham County Agriculture

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

“If it wasn’t for 4-H I do not think I would have developed the skills that have helped me take care of my own horse, and I would not have gained the knowledge that is helping me [study pre-veterinary science.]”
– Oldham County 4-H alumni

Supporting Oldham’s #1 Ag Commodity

The 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey reported a total value of Oldham County’s equine and equine-related assets of $163 million. Oldham County ranks 4th in Kentucky in value of equine sold, 5th in equine operation income, 6th in value of equine and equine acres, and 7th in equine population.

Oldham County Extension supports farm managers and horse owners through site visits to help troubleshoot problems and improve pastures and horse health. This includes improving pastures through reseeding, fertility management, weed control, and grazing management; improving horse diets; and hay testing.

The Extension Service also provides equine programs on worming, pasture management, vaccinations, showmanship, and tack care. Between July 2016 and June 2017, the county 4-H and agriculture agents, as well as numerous community equine professionals and veterinarians, taught seven educational sessions to 4-H members and horse owners. Thirty-six repeat attendees learned valuable horse care information that improved health and safety of both horse and rider.

oc 4-h horse club

Oldham County 4-H’ers at the Kentucky State 4-H Horse Show.

Through monthly educational meetings, 4-H horse club members build social and emotional skills like accountability, empathy, leadership, and confidence.

Beef Field Day

In Oldham County, pasture makes up 32% of available farmland and provides grazing for livestock. Livestock are important to Oldham County’s economy, with cattle alone representing over 2.4 million dollars in sales in 2012, according to the Census of Agriculture.

Because of the importance and prevalence of cattle production in the area, agriculture extension agents in Oldham, Trimble, Henry, and Shelby Counties have organized and held annual Regional Beef Field Days for farmers since 2005. These field days offer farmers an opportunity to see how production practices work on other farms. Field days also promote implementation of new practices that improve production efficiency while protecting natural resources, which are goals outlined in the county plan of work.

In 2016, this event was held at an Oldham County Farm. During the field day, 250 Louisville area producers attended and learned about:

  • Heavy Use Feeding Areas and Other Conservation Practices that Protect Soil and Water
  • Proper Handling Facilities to Minimize Animal Stress
  • Good Herd Health Practices and Update on Antibiotics Use

Farms make up one-half of total land acreage in Oldham County.

“Looking at the handling facilities setup helped me decide on changes needed for my own system.”
– Oldham County farmer

Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

2017 Winter OC Extension Events

The following calendar originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

All activities are held at the Oldham County Extension office unless otherwise noted. Please call to RSVP for classes held at extension offices.

December Extension Calendar

1 Louisville Area Homemakers Council, John Black Center, 10 am
1 4-H Teen Club
4 4-H Robotics Club
5 OC Homemakers Executive Board, 10 am
5 Cattlemen’s Association, 6 pm
7 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
8 Beef Quality Assurance Training/Certification, 9 am
8 OC Beekeepers, 6:30 pm
11 Green Thumbs Garden Club, 9:30 am
11 4-H Cloverbud Club
12 Green Thumbs 4-H Horticulture Club
14 Private Pesticide Applicator Training/Certification, 9 am
14 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
18 Delicious Delights 4-H Cooking Club
18 Santa’s Workshop

December 22 – January 1: Office Closed for Winter Break

January Extension Calendar

4 OC Homemaker Council, 10 am
4 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
8 Green Thumbs, 9:30 am
8 4-H Robotics Club
8-9 KY Fruit & Vegetable Growers Conference, Lexington
9 Ornamental Grasses, 10 am
11 Green Thumbs 4-H Horticulture Club
11-12 KY Cattlemen’s Convention, Lexington
12 OC Beekeepers, 7:30 pm
14-17 American Forage & Grassland Council Conference, Louisville
15 MLK Day, Office Closed
15 4-H Cloverbud Club
15 4-H Teen Club
16 Plant Propagation, 6 pm
17 Master Haymaker begins, Shelby Co. Extension
18 4-H Council
19 Shade Gardens, 10 am
20 Curing The Winter Blues With Succulents, Oldham Co. Conservation District, 10 am
22 Come Sew With Us: Serging, 10 am–2 pm
22 Come Sew With Us: Repair & Up-Cycle, 3–8 pm
25 Homemaker Lesson: Vegetarian 101, 10 am
25 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
26 Private Pesticide Applicator Training, 9 am
29 Delicious Delights 4-H Cooking Club

February Extension Calendar

1 OC Extension Council & District Board
1 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
5 “Spit Polish,” 10 am
5 4-H Robotics Club
7-10 Kentucky Volunteer Forum
9 OC Beekeepers, 7:30 pm
12 Green Thumbs Garden Club, 9:30 am
12 4-H Cloverbud Club
15 Green Thumbs 4-H Club
16 Oldham County Cultural Arts
16 4-H Teen Club
19 Delicious Delights 4-H Club
20 Garden Myths, 6:30 pm
22 Alfalfa/Stored Forages Conference, Cave City
22 Homemaker Lesson: Ins & Outs of Downsizing, 10 am
22 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
23 Louisville Area Cultural Arts
24 Fruit Production
26 Come Sew With Us: Kitchen Accessories, 10 am–2 pm
28 Flower Photography, 6:30 pm

Note: The printed version of the newsletter listed nutrition classes at Dare to Care food pantries. As of November, Dare to Care will no longer be conducting a mobile pantry at the LaGrange Community Center. Dare to Care will continue to contribute to pantries such as HighPoint in La Grange and Grace and Glory in Goshen.