Oldham County 4-H Excels at State Horse Contest

The following 4-H Youth Development article printed in the Oldham Era.

2018 Kentucky State 4-H Horse Contest

On June 7 and 8, eleven 4-H’ers represented Oldham County at the 2018 Kentucky State 4-H Horse Contest in Lexington.

Oldham County 4-H’s Junior Horse Bowl team (Peyton Ash, Sydney Ash, Emily Altsman, and Carrie Olds) won first place. In the individual competition, Peyton earned third, and Carrie took fifth place.

ky 4-h horse contest champs

In the Hippology contest, 4-H’ers test their equine veterinary and management knowledge. The Oldham County 4-H Junior Hippology team was made up of Harper Ash, Peyton Ash, Sydney Cobb, and Carrie Olds. The team placed first in the written section, first in stations, and first in judging, taking first place in the overall competition. Sydney took first in individual performance, Carrie second, and Peyton third.

The Junior Horse Judging team placed third in team performance, fourth in team halter, and second overall. Peyton Ash, Caecilia Isenhart, Freya Isenhart, and Carrie Olds made up the Junior Horse Judging team. Caecilia also won fifth place in performance and first overall. In the senior division, Beth Huffman placed eighth in individual performance.

Oldham County 4-H’ers also took home several awards in the art competitions. In black and white photography, Ida Isenhart earned first place, Caecilia Isenhart took third, and Freya Isenhart came in tenth. Ella Olds won third place for her posed and candid photos as well as third place in art kits and patterns. Carrie Olds took third placed in original art. In equipment, Harper Ash won fifth place. Peyton Ash’s junior presentation earned second place, and her sewing project won third.

Oldham County is proud of the fantastic efforts displayed by our 4-H’ers!

Written by Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reviewed by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent.

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Upcoming Oldham County Events

The following calendar originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

All activities are held at the Oldham County Extension office unless otherwise noted. Please call to RSVP for classes held at Extension offices.

June Extension Events

1-3 District Horse Show
4 4-H Camp Forms due
5 4-H Teen Conference Orientation
6 Green Thumbs/Master Gardener Tour, Lexington
6 Cost-Share Appointments Available
7 Extension District Board, 9am
7 Canning Boot Camp, 6:30pm
7-8 State 4-H Horse Contest
8 Canning Boot Camp, 10am
8 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30pm
11-14 4-H Teen Conference, Lexington
13 Cost-Share Appointments Available
18 Green Thumbs/Master Gardener Tour, Crestwood
18 4-H Camper Orientation
19 4-H Summer Gardening Club, 2-4pm
19 4-H Camp Leader Orientation
20 Cost-Share Appointments Available
21 Extension Council, 9am
21 District Board, 10am
25 Louisville Area Homemakers Annual Meeting, Farnsley-Moreman Landing, 10am
26 4-H Summer Gardening Club, 2-4pm
26-27 Kids Cooking Camp
29 Couch Potato Challenge Logs due

June 30-July 7 State 4-H Horse Show

July Extension Events

5 District Board, 9am
10 4-H Summer Gardening Club, 2-4pm
12 4-H Council
13 Lice Head Checks for 4-H Camp
13 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30pm
14 4-H State Communications, Lexington
16 Oldham County Cattlemen, 7pm
16-20 4-H Camp, Lake Cumberland
17-19 Cooking Basics for Adults
17 Garden Secrets, 6:30pm
23 Home & Family Arts Non-Perishable County Fair Entries, 2-7pm
24 Home & Family Arts Non-Perishable County Fair Entries, 9am-noon
24 4-H Summer Gardening Club, 2-4pm
26 4-H Fair Project Entry Day
28 OC 4-H Dog Show
28 Woodland Owners Short Course, Shelby County Extension
30 Home & Family Arts Perishable County Fair Entries, 9am-noon
30 Ag Fair Entries, 3-7pm

July 31-August 4 Oldham County Fair

August Extension Events

2 District Board, 9am
2 4-H Fashion Revue
2 CAIP Cost-Share Education, 6:30pm
3 CAIP Cost-Share Education, 9am
5 County Fair Entry Pickup, Oldham County Fairgrounds, noon-2pm
7 Insect Pests & Beneficials, 6:30pm
10 4-H State Fair Projects due
10 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30pm
11 Monarch Butterfly Egg Hunt, oldhamccd.com
11-12 State Fair 4-H Dog Show
16-26 Kentucky State Fair
21 Cooking With Herbs, 6:30pm
23 CAIP Cost-Share Education, 6:30pm
24 CAIP Cost-Share Education, 9am

Save the date! The Healthy Oldham County Walk will be September 15.

2018 Oldham County Fair News

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources and Family & Consumer Sciences articles originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

summer garden veggies

Oldham County Fair – Ag Entries Accepted July 30

Ag entries, including vegetables, fruits, hay, straw, and other crops, will be taken at the Extension Office on Monday, July 30th, from 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. Entries will be judged the following morning and taken to the fairgrounds. New this year: check your entries in online ahead of time. Watch our website for details.

oldham county fair entries

2018 Oldham County Fair

The 2018 Oldham County Fair is July 31 through August 4! This year, you will be able to register your entries online. More information will be available soon via oldham.ca.uky.edu/oldham-county-fair.

Home and Family Arts Department entries will be taken at the Oldham County Extension office. Please bring non-perishable items for entry between 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. on Monday, July 23, or 9:00 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, July 24. Perishable entries will be accepted on Monday, July 30, from 9:00 a.m. until noon.

Entries can be picked up at the Oldham County Fairgrounds between noon and 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, August 5. Contact the Extension Office if you have any questions.

oldham county fair entries

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; Chris Duncan, Oldham County Family & Consumer Sciences Agent; and Lauren Fernandez,Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Oldham County Ag News: Cost-Share, Producer Spotlight

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

oldham county cost-share

Cost-Share Applications Anticipated in June

We anticipate having applications available in June for two cost-share programs. Please follow up with our office in early June for application and deadline information These cost-share programs are offered through the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund in partnership with the Oldham County Agriculture Development Council and Oldham County Farm Bureau.

The first cost-share program is the County Agricultural Investment Program. This cost-share offers 11 investment areas that give Kentucky ag producers the ability to increase net farm income, add value to their products, and diversify their operations. This cost-share has a maximum of $1,500 per approved applicant. New this year: some of the investment areas have specific educational requirements in the form of video training. A schedule of these and other educational opportunities will be mailed to those approved for CAIP cost-share.

kentucky youth cost-share

The second cost-share program is the Youth Ag Incentives Program. This cost-share program was developed to benefit youth actively engaged in agriculture and focuses on youth developing agriculture projects. Applicants are required to be enrolled in elementary, middle, or high school, and may also include home school students. Applicants must be at least 9 years of age as of January 1, 2018. Award amount is based on number of applicants, not to exceed $1,500 per applicant.

As a reminder – cash receipts are not eligible for reimbursement in these cost-share programs. CAIP applicants must have a farm serial number to complete an application. If you are unsure of this number, please contact the Farm Service Agency at (502) 845-2820 for more information.

Read more about cost-share guidelines online. Please call our office or email traci.missun@uky.edu with questions about projects that qualify.

Appointments are available with our program administrator for help completing cost-share applications from 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. on the following dates: June 6, June 13, and June 20. Please call (502) 222-9453 to schedule an appointment.

kentucky horse pasture

Producer Spotlight – Managing Small Acreage Horse Pasture

One of the joys of being an agent is seeing people be successful. A few years ago, I met Shannon and Greg Ash. I’d gone over to their place to look at their pastures and help with some questions. Since then, I’ve tested their soil and given advice for timely seeding and weed control for their pastures. Although Shannon and Greg have limited acreage for their horses, they have learned to manage it well.

oc forage producer

A must-have piece of equipment for horse owners is a chain harrow or some other light cultivation implement, especially for those without access to a no-till seeder. A chain harrow allows roughing of the soil in order to get good seed to soil contact that is needed for germination. Chain harrows come in different sizes, including types that can be pulled with ATV’s and UTV’s. Chain harrows can be used to rough the soil (points side down) then flipped to settle seeds into the soil after sowing.

Establishing or reseeding pastures involves several steps, and it’s important to follow through with soil testing, fertilizing, controlling weeds, and managing horses to prevent overgrazing. After testing soil, Shannon and Greg applied fertilizer and lime recommended by the soil test. They followed up with timely herbicide applications to keep problem weeds under control. They also reseeded thinning pastures to provide adequate grazing, keep weeds from coming back, and to prevent erosion. This spring, they shared their latest success:

“We leveled soil in this pasture, then harrowed it both ways (crisscross) to create a good seedbed. In late February, we used a broadcast seeder to spread a mix of perennial ryegrass and clover. We’d planned to run the harrow back over the pasture to get better seed to soil contact, but it started snowing while we were seeding. There were a couple of snows after we seeded. After the new seedlings got about 2 inches high, we went in and hand-raked a few bare spots and reseeded those. The pasture is growing well this spring. We’ve already mowed it to a 5-inch height once. And it’s ready to be mowed again.”

Even though the weather kept them from doing everything exactly as planned, they were still successful. The Ashes plan to keep horses off the pasture for a while to allow good root establishment so horses can’t pull the new grass out of the ground. This is another key to good pasture establishment. Thanks, Shannon and Greg, for sharing your success!

For more information on managing pastures, contact traci.missun@uky.edu or visit forages.ca.uky.edu.

oldham county hay field

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent, and Lauren Fernandez,Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Celebrating Extension Leaders

The following article originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Award & Leader Recognition Program

In March, we celebrated recent state-level achievements of our volunteers and clients with a recognition program at the John Black Community Center.

oc 4h family

Karen Horton is our Extension Leader of the Year! She has led our 4-H Cloverbuds Club for five years, volunteered at 4-H summer camp, and supported Oldham County youth in countless other ways.

ag leader awards

Jon Bednarski and Tee Ray received Ag Water Quality Leader Awards for their outstanding conservation efforts. Both of these gentlemen have been featured in Kentucky Extension promotional videos for ag water quality, viewable online at www.youtube.com/user/UKAgriculture.

oc extension leader awards

Barbara Rosenman received the Friend of Extension Award. As Director of Oldham County Animal Control, she dealt with both domesticated animals and livestock. She has taught Extension programs and helped educate clients about leash laws, spay/neuter programs, and livestock laws.

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent, and Lauren Fernandez,Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Upcoming Oldham County Events

The following calendar originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Upcoming Extension Events

All activities are held at the Oldham County Extension office unless otherwise noted. Please call to RSVP for classes held at Extension offices.

March Extension Events

1 Oldham County Extension District Board, 9 am
1 Chickens 101 (Part 1), Shelby County Extension, 6 pm
1 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
2-3 Organic Association of Kentucky Conference, Lexington
5 Dicamba Training for Grain Producers, Shelby County Extension, 10 am
5 4-H Robotics Club
6 Growing Succulents, 6:30 pm
7 4-H Budget Committee
8 Registration due for Needlework Workshop
8 Chickens 101 (Part 2), John Black Center, 6 pm
9 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30 pm
10 Produce Growers Best Practices, 9 am
12 Green Thumbs Garden Club, 9:30 am
12 4-H Cloverbud Club
13 Needlework Workshop, Shelby County Extension
15 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
15 Improving Garden Soils, Oldham County Arts Center, 6:30 pm
16 Market Scale Certification, 10 am – noon
16 4-H Camp Teen Leader Interviews
17 Oldham County Master Gardeners, 10 am
16 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
19 Delicious Delights 4-H Cooking Club
20 Evening with Extension, John Black Center, 5:30 pm
22 Homemakers Lesson: Couch Potato Challenge, 10 am
22 Homemakers Executive Board, noon
22-24 4-H Leadership Summit
23 Louisville Area Homemakers Council, 8 am – 3 pm
26 Come Sew With Us: Monograming, 3–8 pm
26 Oldham County 4-H Communications Event
27 4-H Teen Club
29 Oldham County Extension Council, 9 am
29 Oldham County Extension District Board, 10 am
29 Green Thumbs 4-H Horticulture Club
31 District 4-H Teen Council

April Extension Events

1 Homemaker Scholarship Applications Due
9 Green Thumbs Garden Club
9 4-H Robotics Club
10 Green Thumbs 4-H Horticulture Club
11 Nutrition Basics for Diabetics, 10:30 am
12 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
13 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30 pm
14 Tree Seedling Giveaway, Oldham County Conservation District
14 District 4-H Communications Event
16 Delicious Delights 4-H Cooking Club
17 Fairy Gardens, 6:30 pm
19 4-H Council
20 SOHS 4-H Reality Store
23 Come Sew With Us: Gardening/Outdoor Accessories, 3–8 pm
26 Homemaker Lesson: Gardening in Small Spaces, 10 am
26 Homemaker Executive Board, noon
26 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
30 4-H Cloverbud Club

May Extension Events

3 Oldham County Extension District Board, 9 am
5-7 KEHA State Meeting, Louisville
7 4-H Robotics Club
8 Native Shrubs, 6:30 pm
10 Green Thumbs 4-H Horticulture Club
11 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30 pm
14 Green Thumbs Garden Club
14 4-H Cloverbud Club
17 Oldham County Homemakers Annual Meeting
17 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
21 Delicious Delights 4-H Cooking Club
22 4-H Camp Teen Leader Training
28 Memorial Day, Extension Office Closed

Protecting Water is for Everyone

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

no-mow zones protect water

Protecting Water – Not Just for Farmers

For many folks, the topic of water quality sounds less than glamorous. But paying attention to our management practices, whether on a farm or in our own back yards, is critical to protect water. The things we do in our pastures, crops, gardens, and lawns can negatively affect our water supply. What can you do to protect water?

  • Use buffer zones and no-mow zones to protect water sources. These zones are areas where fertilizers and pesticides are not applied. No-mow zones encourage natural return of native plants with increased ability to hold the soil in place and prevent erosion.
  • Plant native plants along water edges to help hold soil in place. Native plants are extremely long-rooted compared to lawn grasses and most cultivated flowers.
  • Don’t overstock or overgraze pastures. When overgrazing occurs, soils easily erode, carrying manure with it. And lost topsoil cannot be recovered.
  • Repair failing septic systems. Sometimes cost-share funds to repair these are available from local watershed groups.
  • Don’t apply fertilizer unless soil test shows a need for it.
  • Don’t apply pesticides (weed killers, insect killers, etc.) unless a pest problem has been identified.

A great resource for farmers is UK’s Ag Water Quality Planning website. This site includes an online tool to create an Ag Water Quality Plan, and it features videos of two Oldham County farms: TNT Farms and Sherwood Acres.

Homeowners can benefit from reading ‘Living Along a Kentucky Stream.’ Printed guides are available in our office.

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Ag Agent.

Spring Seed Choices

The following Horticulture article originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

growing sunflowers

Spring Seed Choices

Spring is coming, and it’s time to choose flowers and vegetables for our gardens. A good way to narrow down the thousands of seed choices is to look for the All-American Selections. These varieties have been grown and evaluated in test gardens in many regions throughout the United States and proven choices. The All-American Selection website allows you to sort and view varieties using different filters including year, type, and region. Information about performance is also available.

Among the 2018 All-American Selection vegetable winners for 2018 is Sweet Corn American Dream. An excellent germinator with tender, super sweet kernels, American Dream matures slightly earlier than other sweet corn varieties. The vigorous plants produce cobs that have a good fill of bi-color kernels.

One of the flower winners was French marigold Super Hero Spry. Super Hero Spry is compact (10-12 inches) with dark maroon lower petals and golden yellow upper petals setting on top of the dark green foliage. The blooms are more uniform with a stable color pattern, bloom earlier, and require no deadheading.

The All-American Selections are identified in the seed catalogs and have been staples in gardens for many years. It is fun browsing through the many seed catalogues, checking out all the choices, looking for something different to grow. The All-American Selection is one of many tools to help make seed choices.

Written by Michael Boice, Oldham County Horticulture Extension Assistant. Edited by Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Spring Gardening News

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Two Problem Weeds – Control Them Now

Poison hemlock and Buttercup are two problem weeds that can be controlled in March with herbicide sprays. An herbicide containing 2,4-D as the active ingredient is usually the most economical spray choice that will give good control.

Poison hemlock can be found in pastures, hay fields, and on roadsides. It has a biennial life cycle, meaning each plant lives for two years. This weed spreads by producing many seeds. While mowing can prevent seed formation and spread of this weed, the plant is toxic to livestock. So care should be taken to control it in pastures and hay fields. The poison hemlock in this photo was growing around an old tree stump, adjacent to a hay field. Spraying this patch now will save headaches down the road.

Buttercup is a problem mostly in overgrazed pastures. There are several types of buttercup in Kentucky, and leaf shapes may look different than what’s pictured here. Buttercup is also toxic to livestock. Best control is achieved when sprayed before these plants begin blooming, which is tricky since these may go unnoticed until flowering. Scouting pastures by walking diagonally or zigzagging through each will give a good overview of what’s growing.

When it comes to toxic plants, it’s important to note that animals usually don’t choose to graze these unless they are limited on good forages. But sometimes they don’t read the book and may graze on these plants out of curiosity.

The UK Weeds page is a great resource for more information, including videos and weed identification guides: weedscience.ca.uky.edu/forages

Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Training Has Changed

Kentucky Extension agents are in the process of being certified to teach the new ‘Produce Best Practices Training‘ which replaces GAP training for vegetable and fruit growers.

Note that video training is no longer available. Any producer needing this training must attend a live presentation, given by a certified trainer. If you completed GAP training in the past, your diploma is valid until January 1, 2019.

Please help spread the word to fellow growers. Check the new Kentucky Farmers Market manual online for details. At time of print, there are currently two trainings scheduled here and nearby. Call (502) 222-9453 to register or to get information on other sessions in other counties.

  • Oldham County Extension Office March 10, 9:00 a.m.
  • Shelby County Extension Office April 12, 9:00 a.m.

Interesting Insect Pests

A client recently sent this photo for identification. While cultivating the soil in his vegetable high tunnel, he found these insect pupae about four inches deep in the ground. University of Kentucky Entomology confirmed that these are the pupal stage of the tomato hornworm.

garden pest tomato hornworm

There are typically two or three generations of this pest each year, with the final generation overwintering in the soil and emerging as a moth in spring. The adult stage of this pest belongs to the insect family often called Sphinx or Hawk Moths. This family also includes the unusual hummingbird moth.

During the caterpillar stage, the tomato hornworm feeds on tomato plants and fruits and can cause substantial yield loss. Tips for controlling hornworms and other garden pests are included online in the UK Home Vegetable Gardening Guide. Print copies of this guide are available at the office.

Photos of the caterpillar and moth stage of the tomato hornworm are available online at UK Entomology or by searching ‘Kentucky Critter Files.’

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Ag Agent.

Opportunites for 4-H’ers and Volunteers

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

4-H Speech Program Builds Confidence

Public speaking is one of Americans’ biggest fears. 4-H presents the opportunity for youth to conquer this fear at a young age by participating in the public speaking program. By learning public speaking skills, youth will have the confidence, organizational skills and composure to become the influential leaders of tomorrow.

The important thing is for young people to give 4-H public speaking a try. The earlier they begin the program and the longer they stick with it, the stronger their public speaking skills will be. Youth can deliver speeches on any topic they find interesting. As they look for more information on the topic, they develop valuable research skills. They also learn organizational skills by composing the speech and giving it the proper structure. Finally, they must use creative techniques to get the audience’s attention.

Competition begins at the club level qualifying for the county competition on March 26th. County winners advance to a district tournament on April 14th, and district winners advance to a state tournament, held in July at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Judges evaluate the presentation and the speaker’s ability to clearly deliver a message. It’s not too late to get involved in a 4-H speech program! Call (502) 222-9453 for details.

HELP! We need judges for the Communication Competitions on March 26 and April 14. If you are interested in volunteering to judge a speech or demonstration contest, please contact Kelly Woods at (502) 222-9453. We need your help to make this a rewarding experience for our 4-H’ers!

backyard chickens 101

Got Chickens?

If your family is interested in keeping chickens, your first step should be attending the “Chickens 101” workshop. The first session on March 1 focuses on Breed Selection, Chick Care, Housing and Predator Control. Get the rundown on Health and Nutrition at the second session on March 8. Please call (502) 222-9453 or email traci.missun@uky.edu to register.

Oldham County Extension would like to organize a 4-H Poultry Club. If your child wants to join or you are interested in leading the club, please contact Kelly Woods via (502) 222-9453 or kwoods@uky.edu.

oc 4h reality store

Volunteer at the 4-H Reality Store

South Oldham High School 4-H Reality Store will be held on Friday, April 20th. We need volunteers to make this event possible. Contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Office via (502) 222-9453 or kwoods@uky.edu if you can help out!

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent.