Youth Heart Disease Information

youth heart disease info

Heart Disease

Youth Health Bulletin

Have you ever heard that someone you know has heart disease? It is a very common illness, and in fact, more than 60 million Americans have it. Wally Cat wants to make sure you know what heart disease is and how you can take care of your heart.

What is Heart Disease?

Heart disease is also known as cardiovascular disease. As you may have guessed, a person who has heart disease has problems with their heart and blood vessels — they are not working the way they should.

There are many problems that people with heart disease have, such as high blood pressure and chest pains. People with heart disease are also more likely to have heart attacks and strokes. A heart attack is when there is a blockage of blood flow to the heart. This means that the heart is not getting the blood that is needed for it to work properly. A stroke is when a place in the brain is not getting enough blood.

Other Problems for People With Heart Disease

  • The arteries get hard, making it more difficult to move blood through the body.
  • An area of fat and cholesterol builds up, making the passageway for blood narrower. This makes it harder for blood to get to the body.

Can You Catch Heart Disease?

Heart disease is not an illness that is spreads by germs like a cold! There are risk factors that can increase a person’s chances of getting heart disease. Some of the risk factors cannot be controlled, such as getting older and having other people in the family with the disease. There are some risk factors that can be controlled, such as smoking, having high blood pressure, being overweight, or not exercising enough.

How Do You Prevent Heart Disease?

There are ways you can start to prevent heart disease even at your age. You can watch out for some of the risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and physical inactivity. As a child, you can watch what you eat and how much you are active.

youth heart disease information

Try to eat lots of fruits and vegetables — and if they are fresh, even better! Also, you should try to be as active as you can. Throughout the day, you should be active for at least an hour. You also want to be aware of how much time you are sitting in front of a screen, whether it is the TV, computer, tablet, or phone. This type of activity has little to no physical activity.

Fun ways to be physically active include:

  • Riding your bike. You might be able to go for a bike ride in your neighborhood or at a nearby park.
  • Swimming. Join a swim team through your school or community. The Oldham County YMCA has an indoor pool so you can stay active even during winter.
  • Walking your dog. Physical activity is good for you and Fido too!

Wally Cat wants you to know about heart disease because it affects so many people. He also wants you to start good habits to protect your heart, such as eating healthy and staying active.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control. Wally Cat illustrations by Chris Ware (© University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences).

Get Your Kids to Eat Their Veggies

get kids to eat veggies

Getting Children to Eat Their Veggies

Do you hear “I don’t like vegetables!” during family dinner? According to research from the American Academy for Science and the Centers for Disease Control, children turn up their noses at vegetables because parents have not made them readily available. Let’s face it, few children will take the time to wash a head of broccoli or cauliflower, break the pieces apart, serve them up on a plate, and then eat them.

Parents can increase the chances that their children will eat a particular vegetable if it is in a small container or individual plastic bag in the refrigerator. This makes vegetables an easy snack option for children to choose themselves.

get kids eating veggies

Children form food habits at an early age. Research shows a correlation between picky children and picky adults. It is important for parents to introduce good eating habits in children when they are young. It is, however, never too late to start.

Tips to Get Children to Eat Vegetables

Be a role model. Offer vegetables to children by eating them yourself. Let children approach them on their own.

Set some rules. Children usually will accept vegetables in an environment where parents set appropriate rules. For example, it is okay to tell your child they need to taste a vegetable before they decide they do not like it.

Stay positive. Using strategies such as punishment, threats, force, or even offering the child a reward have been shown to be unsuccessful ways of teaching children to eat vegetables. Vegetables should be offered in a relaxed environment.

Don’t give up. Keep offering the vegetables. It might be helpful to offer the vegetable to the child in different ways or mixing the vegetable with other foods. Many parents throw in the towel after the child refuses a vegetable the first time, but understand that children generally have a fear of new foods. It may take about eight to ten tries with a vegetable before your child is ready to taste it. In addition, it may take a lot more tasting before your child gets to the point where he or she likes the vegetable. Be patient as your child experiences new foods.

Be creative. Offer children vegetables in different forms (cooked, raw, and mixed with other foods) before you decide they do not like them.

Be flexible. Children vary in how much they eat and what they like. Each child is an individual. Do not have predetermined ways in which your child should eat or accept vegetables.

Be reasonable. Keep in mind that vegetable servings for children are smaller than vegetable servings for adults. A general guideline is one tablespoon of vegetable for each year of life. Do not have unrealistic expectations for your child.

Give options. Offer a variety of vegetables at a particular meal. This allows children to be able to choose a vegetable they like.

get your children to get their vegetables

Take Action: Make it Happen

Vegetables offers protection from many diseases, and thanks to the vitamins and minerals they provide, improves your child’s health. It is important for children to eat the recommended amount of vegetables daily.

Parents, try these tricks to make vegetables more enticing to your children:

  • Offer vegetables daily. Children will not eat vegetables if parents do not cook and serve them.
  • Let children pick out a vegetable of the week at the grocery store.
  • Make vegetables easy for children to grab and eat. Have ready to eat vegetable snacks in small bags in the refrigerator.
  • Set out a plate of vegetables with dip before dinner or when children get home from school.
  • Prepare vegetables in a way in which they are tender but crisp. Children tend to dislike mushy vegetables and many prefer raw vegetables for this reason.
  • Include two vegetables at dinner; try offering both cooked and raw vegetables. This allows children to have a choice of vegetable they want to eat.
  • Add lettuce leaves to sandwiches.
  • Add blended vegetables such as spinach to spaghetti sauce, soups, and casserole. It is a good idea to blend or cut up the vegetable finely before adding it to spaghetti sauce. Children may not even notice the vegetable is there.
  • Make food fun. Let children create funny faces or animals with cut up vegetables.
  • Let children help prepare vegetable recipes; they generally enjoy what they have made.
  • Allow kids to make their own salad. Put out small bowls of baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, shredded leaf lettuce, raisins, fruit, and crunch noodles. They love the feeling of control that comes from doing it themselves.
  • Try heirloom vegetables. Kids get excited about interesting vegetables. Take your children to a farmer’s market and have them pick out the heirlooms they would like to try.

getting kids to eat veggies

Written by Ingrid Adams, Nutrition and Food Science Extension Specialist; Mallory Foster, Family and Consumer Sciences graduate student; and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Whooping Cough Fact Sheet

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

You may have heard about the cases of whooping cough in Lexington. Although most persons you may meet are vaccinated against the illness, it is important to be aware of whooping cough, its symptoms, and treatment.

Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a respiratory illness. It is very contagious. Pertussis vaccines are the most effective tool to prevent this illness, but like all vaccines, it is not 100% effective. This means that if whooping cough has been going through the community, there is still a chance that a fully vaccinated person can catch the illness. If a person has been vaccinated, however, the infection is usually not as bad for him or her.

Whooping cough spreads from person to person through coughing, sneezing, or even being in close proximity to someone with the illness. Many people are infected with whooping cough by siblings, parents, or caregivers who do not even know they have the illness. Symptoms of the illness usually begin within five to ten days after being exposed but could take up to three weeks to manifest.

Whooping Cough Symptoms

There are two stages of symptoms for whooping cough: early stage and late stage.

Early stage symptoms

(First 1 to 2 weeks)

  • Runny nose
  • Low-grade fever (generally minimal throughout the course of the disease)
  • Mild, occasional cough
  • Apnea (pause in breathing) in babies

Late stage symptoms

(The traditional symptoms people associate with whooping cough)

  • Fits of many, rapid coughs followed by a high-pitched “whoop” on the inhale
  • Vomiting (throwing up) during or after coughing fits
  • Exhaustion after coughing fits

Pertussis Symptoms for Babies

Symptoms for babies are very different from older children and adults. Babies might not even have a cough or it could be a slight cough. They are also likely to show apnea (a long pause in breathing). This illness is very dangerous for babies. Information about babies who have the illness shows that about 50% of babies under one year need care in the hospital.

What to Do if Seeing Symptoms

If a school age child is showing symptoms, he or she should stay home from school and visit a healthcare provider. You should take your child to a healthcare provider even if he or she has been vaccinated. If your child has whooping cough, he or she will need to stay out of school until all antibiotics have been taken.

If a person in your home has whooping cough, the healthcare provider may recommend that others in the home also take an antibiotic to prevent the spread of the illness.

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a contagious respiratory illness. Be on the watch for symptoms for you and your family and visit a healthcare provider should you think someone may have the illness.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control.

Spring OC 4-H News

The following 4-H Youth Development articles printed in the Spring 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Attention: 4-H Participation Forms Due

Please do not forget all 4-H members must be registered with Oldham County 4-H by April 15, 2017 in order to qualify to compete in any 4-H events. This requirement applies to all 4-H competitions including Horse Show, Horse Contest, and Dog Show as well as the Oldham County 4-H Fair.

State 4-H Achievement Award Winners Announced

Congratulations to the following Oldham County 4-H members for earning State Achievement Awards:

Bronze Award
Maggie Anderson
Keirstin Kennedy
Emmett King
Ruby Mason
Coral Schulte
Ethan Willis

Silver Award
Noah Anderson
Beth Huffman

Gold Level Interviews
Hannah Anderson
Sarah Griffin
Molly Logsdon
Olivia Minor
Karmen Woods

Gold Level Interviews will be held on Saturday, March 4, in Clark County. Interviewing is the final step of the Gold Level Achievement Award. Gold Level Honorees will be announced the second week of March.

oc 4h dog club

Upcoming 4-H Dog Program Dates

Take your dog to camp. Dog Camp is the perfect opportunity for 4-H’ers to work with their dogs one-on-one and in group instruction situations. The 2017 Kentucky State 4-H Dog Camp will be held at J.M. Feltner 4-H Camp from May 19 to 21. If you would like to receive registration information, contact the Oldham County Extension office at 222-9453, and we will send the information to you when it becomes available.

The 4-H Dog Volunteer Certification Program will be available twice this fall. Volunteers can attend training on September 23 at McCracken County Extension office or November 4 at Wolfe County Extension office.

Qualifying for Competitive 4-H Horse Events

4-H members who would like to qualify to participate in any 4-H Competitive Horse Event (this includes 4-H Horse Shows) must complete six hours of instructional training taught or approved by their 4-H Certified Horse Club Leader. Please meet with your leader now to ensure completion of the six required hours of instruction prior to April 15th. Documentation must accompany your registration or show paperwork.

oc 4h horse club

Note upcoming competition 4-H horse events. The District 4-H Horse Show will be held June 2-4. State Horse Judging is June 14 with the State Horse Contest on June 15. The State Horse Show will be July 2-8.

Start Thinking About the Oldham County Fair

The 2017 Oldham County Fair will be August 1-5. Projects will be entered on July 27 at the Oldham County Extension office and will be available for pick up on August 5 at the Oldham County fairgrounds. Registration forms are due to the extension office by July 6. Remember, to be eligible to exhibit projects in the 4-H categories during the county fair, youth must be a registered 4-H member by April 15. Fairbook available online. Note major changes in Arts & Crafts and Photography categories.

4-H Speech Program

The following 4-H Youth Development article printed in the Spring 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

oc 4h speech

4-H Speech Program Inspires Confidence

Public speaking is often one of our biggest fears. 4-H presents the opportunity for youth to conquer this fear at a young age by participating in the public speaking program. Public speaking skills help youth develop the confidence, organizational skills, and composure to become the influential leaders of tomorrow.

It is important for young people to give 4-H public speaking a try. The earlier children begin the program, and the longer they stick with it, the stronger their public speaking skills will be. Youth are encouraged to deliver speeches on any topic they find interesting. The search for more information on the topic promotes valuable research skills. Composing the speech with proper structure teaches organizational skills. Young speakers also learn to use creative techniques to grab their audience’s attention.

Competition begins at the club level, qualifying for the county competition on March 27. County winners advance to the April 15th district tournament. District champions advance to the state tournament in July at the University of Kentucky. Judges evaluate presentation and ability to clearly deliver a message.

It’s not too late to get involved in a 4-H speech program! Call 222-9453 for details. Speakers can register online.

HELP!! We need judges for the 4-H Communication Competitions on March 27 and April 15. Interested in volunteering to judge a speech or demonstration contest? Please contact Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent, at 222-9453. We need your help to make this a rewarding experience for our 4-H’ers!

Winter Oldham County 4-H News

The following 4-H Youth Development articles printed in the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Achievement Award Recipients Recognized at 4-H Banquet

The 4-H Achievement Program recognizes members beginning in the sixth grade. The application is a detailed resume of the member’s 4-H and community involvement. Scholarships are available at each state level achieved. Congratulations to the following 4-H members who have completed a Clover Achievement Level:

Clover Level 1
Adelle Minor
Caroline Olds
Izzy Perez

Clover Level 2
Rebekah Anderson
Lilly Crook
Ella Olds

Clover Level 3
Maggie Anderson
Keirstin Kennedy
Emmett King
Ruby Mason
Coral Schulte
Ethan Willis

Clover Level 4
Noah Anderson

Clover Level 5
Rebekah Degnan
Beth Huffman
Olivia Minor

Interviewing for the Gold Award
Hannah Anderson
Sarah Griffin
Molly Logsdon
Olivia Minor
Karmen Woods

Those members who achieved Clover Level Three, Four, or Five will advance to the state level for judging. Good luck, 4-H’ers!

Santa’s Workshop 2016

4-h santa's workshop

Moms and Dads, do you need a little bit more time to get those last few presents wrapped or to shop for the last gift on your list? If so, send your kids to the extension office to have some fun and make gifts they can give to their friends and family.

Santa’s Workshop will be held at the Oldham County Extension office on Monday, December 19, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. We will make holiday gifts for friends and family. The $25 supply fee includes lunch. Open to boys and girls ages 8 to 12. Call 222-9453 to register.

4-H Communications Program Gets Underway in January

Youth develop organizational and critical thinking skills by learning the logical way to prepare a speech or present information through a demonstration. Competitive events give youth the opportunity to practice what they have learned and receive positive, constructive suggestions to improve.

Standing up and delivering a speech or presentation develops independence and confidence in youth. These experiences help youth overcome the fear of speaking in public. Members know that success is due to their preparation and presentation skills. Speaking in front of a large group or only a few individuals with ease gives people a sense of belonging and the opportunity to bond with other youth and adults. Many doors are opened in terms of personal friendships and professional advancement.

After mastering skills, gaining independence, and developing a sense of belonging, youth want to share what they’ve learned. They may initiate and lead a service project in the community or help their peers in various other ways. Generosity such as this is an innate part of all aspects of our 4-H Youth Development program.

A broad range of communications expertise is vital for today’s youth and tomorrow’s adults. 4-H Youth Development helps youth improve their quality of speech and association with others, whether one-on-one in a job interview or a keynote address in a banquet hall. Contact the Oldham County 4-H office at 222-9453 or amy.logsdon@uky.edu if your child is interested in participating in the 4-H Communication Program.

Source: Dr. Mark Mains, Kentucky 4-H Youth Development Assistant Director.

Attention Horse Club Members

In order to qualify for participation in any 4-H Competitive Horse Event, including 4-H horse shows, 4-H’ers must complete 6 hours of instruction taught by their 4-H Certified Horse Club Leader. The 6 instructional hours must be completed before April 15th and be documented by the Certified Horse Club Leader.

Please meet with your 4-H Certified Horse Club Leader now to ensure you will have your completed and documented 6 hours of instruction prior to April 15th. Members must also have their 4-H enrollment form submitted to the extension office on April 15th. Documentation of hours completed must accompany your registration or show paperwork.

4-H Thankful for Volunteers

The following 4-H Youth Development article printed in the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

4-h fun volunteers

4-H is Thankful for our Volunteers

Now is the time of the year when many of us reflect on all of the things for which we are grateful. In Oldham County 4-H, one of the things we are most grateful for is the volunteer support. Our volunteers are leaders, cheerleaders, mentors, and advocates for our youth. It is with their help and service that many young people find their voice or passion and become healthy, capable, caring, and productive adults.

Volunteers assist by leading club meetings, serving as camp counselors, judging speech and demonstration contests, and utilizing their unique interests, skills and abilities to serve the 4-H program and extend it to audiences which would otherwise be unserved. In the process, our volunteers shape future leaders by demonstrating leadership skills, instilling a sense of community, and offering a positive connection with someone from a different age group or generation.

4-h sewing volunteers

Whether they serve episodically or for many years, volunteers are a valuable and essential component of 4-H. Without their help, most 4-H programs would be impossible to deliver. While they do not serve for praise or recognition, many volunteers get a great deal of fulfillment, self-satisfaction, and enjoyment out of volunteer service, as they watch youth develop self-confidence, self-worth, and leadership skills.

4-h cooking volunteers

If you are a volunteer, thank you for all that you do. If you are interested in more information about learning how to volunteer with the Oldham County 4-H program, contact the extension office at 222-9453.

4-h engineering volunteers

Source: Ken Culp, District III, Principal Extension Specialist for Volunteerism, 4-H Youth Development

Tips for Fall Allergy Sufferers

ky fall allergy tips

Tips for Fall Allergies

From festivals to marathons, colorful leaves to pumpkin spice, there’s a lot to look forward to in the fall. If you suffer from fall allergies, however, it can be difficult to enjoy the joys of the season.

Hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, starts with cold-like symptoms. Unlike a cold that goes away within a week, hay fever lingers until the cause of the allergic reaction is identified and treated. One of the most common causes, especially during the fall allergy season, is ragweed. Ragweed begins to pollinate in mid-August and sticks around until a hard freeze.

Mold can cause problems for allergy sufferers any time of the year, but a warmer-than-normal fall, high humidity, or windy conditions can allow mold spores to be released into the air for an extended period of time.

Raking leaves, a common fall chore, can also stir up mold and pollen in the ground. Allergy sufferers who rake their yard can use an N-95 respirator mask when raking leaves to lessen the impacts of allergens. Children who have allergies should avoid jumping or playing in leaves.

ky fall hay fever

Many indoor allergies can worsen in the fall as you stay inside more. While you can’t get rid of all the allergens in your home, you can minimize them. Here are some tips:

  • Wash your sheets weekly in hot water and your blankets every two to three weeks to kill dust mites.
  • Replace pillows every two to three years.
  • Encase your mattress, pillows and other padded furniture with allergen-proof covers.

Sometimes signs of allergies aren’t straightforward due to the difficulty in distinguishing allergy symptoms from the common cold. This is especially true with children. If you or your child has cold symptoms that last more than a week or seem to occur at the same time every year, you may want to talk with your health care provider about the situation. Only a certified health care provider can truly diagnose allergies and prescribe treatments.

More information on healthy living is available at the Oldham County Extension office. Call (502) 222-9453 to speak with Chris Duncan, Oldham County Family & Consumer Science Agent.

ky fall allergies

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Senior Extension Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

OC 4-H’ers Excel at State Shoot

2016 KY State Shoot Results

Oldham County 4-H Shooting Sports

The Kentucky 4-H State Shooting Sports Competition was held in Wilmore, KY on September 10 and 11. Seventy-eight Oldham County 4-H’ers between the ages of nine and eighteen competed in .22 Pistol, .22 Rifle, Air Pistol, Archery, and Trap/Shotgun. Oldham County 4-H’ers won a total of fifty-four trophies, six jackets, and two top scores.

oc 4h archery

ARCHERY

2nd Place Bare Bow Team (Age 9-11)
Cole Powell
Izzy Perez
Andrew Myers
Emma Reader

2nd Place Bare Bow Team (Age 12-14)
Spencer Wieland
Anna Laverty
Will Shannon
Lilly Crook

3rd Place Bare Bow Team (Age 15-18)
Brandon Howard
Max Renner
Megan Snyder
Sarah Griffin

1st Place Individual Bare Bow (Age 12-14)
Spencer Wieland

oc 4h rifling

RIFLE .22 Sport

1st Place Team (Age 9-11)
Cole Powell
Sarah Grace Jackson
Andrew Myers
Izzy Perez

1st Place Individual (Age 9-11)
Cole Powell

2nd Place Individual (Age 9-11)
Sarah Grace Jackson

1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
Dain MacDonald
Kaitlyn Snyder
Brian Ball
Parker Jones

3rd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
Dain MacDonald

1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
John Clore
Dalton Harjes
Shane Bickett
Cameron Rice

1st Place Individual (Age 15-18) (High Overall)
John Clore

2nd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
Dalton Harjes

3rd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
Shane Bickett

oc 4h air pistol

AIR PISTOL

1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
Dain MacDonald
Kaitlyn Snyder
Brian Ball
Logan Roberts

1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
Cameron Rice
Shane Bickett
Dalton Harjes
John Clore

1st Place Individual (Age 15-18)
Shane Bickett (149 out of 150) High Overall

3rd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
John Clore

oc 4h state shoot awards

.22 PISTOL

1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
Dain MacDonald
Kaitlyn Snyder
Brian Ball
Olivia Minor

1st Place Individual (Age 12-14)
Dain MacDonald

2nd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
Kaitlyn Snyder

3rd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
Olivia Minor

1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
Shane Bickett
Dalton Harjes
John Clore
Cameron Rice

2nd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
John Clore

Congratulations to everyone who participated!

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reviewed by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

Fall Oldham County Sewing Classes

2016 OC Sewing

Come Sew With Us

Angela Morris, Oldham County Master Clothing Volunteer, has lots of new ideas to share with more classes this year. Be sure to check out her topics, supply lists, dates, and times for great sewing projects!

oc sewing class

Monday, September 26, 4-8pm ♦ Sewing Organizers

Materials Needed:

  • 3/4 yard outer fabric (If using one-way design, you will need more)
  • 3/4 yard lining fabric
  • 3/4 yard thin batting
  • 2 packages wide double fold bias tape (or make your own bias: 2 1/4 inch by 4 1/2 yards)
  • one decorative button to hang thread catcher
  • (optional) two 6 x 8 inch pieces of clear vinyl
♦♦♦


oc sewing class

Monday, October 24, 4-8pm ♦ Scarfs or Shawls

You will need:

  • 4 yards soft flowy fabric
  • thread to match
♦♦♦


oldham county sewing class

Monday, November 28, 4-8pm ♦ Place Mats or Table Runners

Supply List:

  • 1 1/2 yard light colored top fabric
  • 1 1/2 yard thin batting
  • 1 3/4 yard backing and binding fabric
  • several small scraps of fabric for applique (10 x 10 inch should do)
  • 1 yard fusible web

Sew With Your Kid

Is teaching your child to sew on your to-do list? Here is your chance to sew along with your child.

Each parent child team will construct a pillow case and laundry bag. All supplies will be provided with registration fee of $30.00. Join us from 4:15 to 6:15 on Tuesday, September 27 for pillow cases and Tuesday, October 4th for laundry bags. Call 222-9453 to register.

Written by Kelly Woods, OC 4-H Agent, and Chris Duncan, OC Family & Consumer Science Agent. Edited by Lauren State, OC Extension Staff Assistant.