Fun Summer Activities for Teens

Challenge Your Teen’s Brain over Summer Vacation

While many adolescents look forward to summer vacation, it is not uncommon for them to quickly grow bored. Bored teens often turn to television and electronics. With a little encouragement, however, a teen can transform a bored brain into one that is healthy and active, and in turn, create a most memorable summer vacation.

Activities that can keep your teen happy, fit, and healthy include:

  • Spend time as a family. Go on vacation or create “stay-cations” to explore your own community or state.
  • Hold family/neighborhood Olympics. Create a day (or weekend) of fun physical and mental activities that can played on teams. Have contests and medals.
  • Go for a hike, bike ride, or find other ways to be physically active. Explore new trails, terrain, or a nature center. Oldham County parks offer trails, picnic shelters, basketball courts, horseshoe pits, disc golf, and more!

ky tree park

  • Hold a family board game or card night.
  • Plan an outdoor movie night in the backyard.
  • Make food fun. Play “chopped” kitchen or “iron chef,” or put each member of the family in charge of planning a menu and making dinner as a family.
    Find new recipes on the Kentucky Proud website.

  • Volunteer as a family and get involved in the community. Soup kitchens, homeless shelters, churches, hospitals, nursing homes, libraries, and humane societies are often looking for help. Community service can provide a teen with a sense of accomplishment and purpose.
    Places to volunteer in Oldham County include Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve, the Humane Society of Oldham County, Mission Crestwood, Yew Dell Botanical Gardens, and more.
  • Start a garden. Use it for pizzas, salad, or flowers. Gardens offer both nutritional and psychological benefits.
  • Plan an event. Planning a party such as a back-to-school barbecue can teach a teen planning, budgeting, and organizing.

Written by Amy F. Hosier, Extension Family Life Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Reference: Witmer, D. (2017). 6 Types of Fun Summer Activities for Teens. Retrieved online May 18, 2017.

Summer 2017 4-H Events

The following 4-H Youth Development calendar printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

June 4-H Calendar

2-4 District Horse Show
5 All 4-H Camp Forms Due
5 Teen Conference Orientation
6 Project Day: 2-Point Perspective
8 Project Day: Leaf Printing
8 Extension Council & District Board
9 Project Day: Making An Electromagnet
12 Robotics Club
12-15 Teen Conference
16 Project Day: 4-H Clover Photography
15-16 State Horse Contest
20 Camp Leader Orientation
22 Camper Orientation

July 4-H Calendar

2-8 State Horse Show
4 Office closed for Independence Day
8 State Communications Day
10-12 Kids Cooking Camp
13 4-H Council Meeting
14 Head Lice Checks for Camp
17-21 4-H Camp
27 Fair Project Entry Day

August 4-H Calendar

2 4-H Fashion Revue
1-5 Oldham County Fair
11 State Fair Projects to Office
12-13 State Fair Dog Show
17-27 Kentucky State Fair

Oldham County Dog Show details to be announced.

Enter the 2017 Oldham County Fair

The following 4-H Youth Development and Family & Consumer Science articles printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

4-H at the County Fair

Oldham County 4-H Fair

Don’t wait until the last minute to finish those 4-H fair projects! The 2017 Oldham County Fair is August 1 through 5. 4-H fair registration forms are due to the office by July 5. Early registration allows staff time to print entry tags for easy distribution on entry day. Projects will need to be delivered to the extension office between 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 27. Projects will be judged July 28, and entries will be transported by 4-H staff and volunteers to the fairgrounds on Monday, July 31. Judging early will enable us to meet the State Fair registration deadline.

oc 4-h county fair

The Oldham County 4-H Fair catalog is now available online at oldham.ca.uky.edu/4h-fair. A printed version of the catalog is also available at the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Office. All 4-H projects will need to be picked up on Sunday, August 6, between noon and 2:00 p.m. at the Oldham County Fairgrounds.

Sign Up Today for the Fashion Revue

The 4-H Fashion Revue promotes skills in construction, selection, and coordination of clothing. 4-H members will have the opportunity to model clothing in the Sewing and Fashion Magic categories. The Sewing category allows 4-H’ers to model clothing they have entered in the 4-H Fair. In Fashion Magic, 4-H members model outfits and accessories they have purchased and assembled.

oc 4-h fair fashion revue

The 2017 Oldham County 4-H Fashion Revue is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 3, at Mount Tabor United Methodist Church in Centerfield. For more information on entering, contact the extension office via (502) 222-9453 or amy.logsdon@uky.edu.

Enter the County Fair

Home & Family Arts Department

The 2017 Oldham County Fair is set for August 1 through 5. Department categories and rules are available at the extension office as well as online at oldham.ca.uky.edu/oldham-county-fair. All Home & Family Arts Department entries will be taken at the Oldham County Cooperative Extension office.

Check in nonperishable entries on Monday, July 24, from 1:00 to 7:00 p.m. or Tuesday, July 25, between 9:00 a.m. and noon. Judging follows at 12:30 p.m.

Perishable entries will be accepted between 9:00 a.m. and noon on Monday, July 31.

At 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 26, the Family & Consumer Science Agent will begin arranging entries for display in the Home & Family Arts Building at the Oldham County Fairgrounds.

Entry check out is between noon and 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, August 6, at the Oldham County Fairgrounds.

oc fair

Volunteers are needed to help register entries, assist judges, and arrange displays for the 2017 Oldham County Fair. Contact Chris Duncan via (502) 222-9453 or crivera@uky.edu to volunteer your time.

4-H Summer Programs

The following 4-H Youth Development articles printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Solar Eclipse Camp

total solar eclipse

Solar Eclipse Camp will be August 18-21 at the West Kentucky 4-H Camp in Dawson Springs, Kentucky. A premiere viewing location, the camp sits directly in the path of the TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE!

Ages 9 through 18 are eligible to attend. The $250 camp fee includes all activities, lodging, meals, snacks, t-shirt, and special solar eclipse viewing glasses. Participants experience a space-themed camp with class options that include:

  • Weather
  • Rockets
  • Drones
  • Astronomy
  • Space exploration
  • And more!
  • Special guests from NASA, TV meteorologists, and astronomers are scheduled.

    For more information contact Shane Browning, West Kentucky Camp Director, via (270) 797-8758 or shanebrowning@uky.edu.

    Kentucky Forestry, Entomology, and Wildlife Leadership Program

    Interested in the environment? Want to know more about forests, trees, insects, water, and wildlife? If yes, then the Forestry, Entomology, and Wildlife Leadership Program is for you!

    Students who have completed their sophomore or junior year of high school are eligible to participate. The program will be held from June 4 through 9 at Lake Cumberland Education Center in Jabez, Kentucky. More information is available online at kflp.ca.uky.edu.

    Summer Project Days

    Join 4-H during the summer for Project Days where we build and create interesting, creative projects that can be entered in the fair to win ribbons and premiums! View the Fair Catalog online at oldham.ca.uky.edu/4h-fair or at the extension office during fair season. Registration for fair entries should be submitted to the Oldham County Extension office by July 5.

    Registration information for Summer Project Days is available online: oldham.ca.uky.edu/4h-project-days

    oc 4-h project days

    Discover Two-Point Perspective Drawing! Learn to write your name using two-point perspective, and make a beautiful piece of art that you can enter in the fair and then hang in your room. This class takes place from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 6. The supply fee is $5.

    Learn about Kentucky trees in Leaf Printing! Participants will identify 10 leaves and their primary uses, then make a notebook of leaf prints displaying their new knowledge. Leaf Printing is scheduled for Thursday, June 8, between 1:00 and 3:00 p.m. with a supply fee of $5.

    Making an Electromagnet will be the subject of the class on Friday, June 9, between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. Learn about electricity using Snap Circuits, then mount your own electromagnet. $10 covers all necessary supplies.

    The last 4-H Project Day of the summer will be from 10:00 a.m. to noon on Friday, June 16. In 4-H Clover Photography, you will express your unique style by designing your own 3D 4-H Clover and photographing it! This class has a $5 supply fee.

    4-H Awards

    The following 4-H Youth Development articles printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

    Kentucky 4-H Gold Award Recipient

    Congratulations to Molly Logsdon who received the Kentucky 4-H Gold Achievement Award, the second highest 4-H award in the state.

    4-h gold award winner

    A lifelong 4-H’er, Molly joined the Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County at age six as a Cloverbud. She has attended 4-H Camp since age nine, and this will be her fourth year in a camp leadership role. President of the Oldham County Teen Club, Molly also serves on the Kentucky 4-H State Teen Council and the State Teen Newsletter Committee. Two of their current projects include establishing the District 3 Teen Council and Teaching Positivity Through Improv.

    This November, Molly will representing Kentucky 4-H at the 2017 National 4-H Congress in Atlanta, Georgia. We are so proud of you, Molly!

    State Communications Day

    Oldham County 4-H’ers conducted speeches and demonstrations at the 2017 District 3 Communications event in April. A special congratulations to those that will be moving on to the state competition in July: Hannah Anderson, Maggie Anderson, Sarah Griffin, Kendall Kennedy, Sam Ray. Excellent work, 4-H’ers!

    oc 4-h district communications winners

    State Dog Skillathon Results

    The 2017 State 4-H Dog Skillathon was held on Saturday, March 11th in Scott County. Congratulations to the following Oldham County 4-H’ers for their achievements:

    Beth Huffman and Carrie Olds both placed third in the individual skillathon.

    The Junior Team received reserve champion: Carrie Olds (team captain), Ella Olds, and Peyton Ash.

    oc 4-h dog awards

    Youth Heart Disease Information

    youth heart disease info

    Heart Disease

    Youth Health Bulletin

    Have you ever heard that someone you know has heart disease? It is a very common illness, and in fact, more than 60 million Americans have it. Wally Cat wants to make sure you know what heart disease is and how you can take care of your heart.

    What is Heart Disease?

    Heart disease is also known as cardiovascular disease. As you may have guessed, a person who has heart disease has problems with their heart and blood vessels — they are not working the way they should.

    There are many problems that people with heart disease have, such as high blood pressure and chest pains. People with heart disease are also more likely to have heart attacks and strokes. A heart attack is when there is a blockage of blood flow to the heart. This means that the heart is not getting the blood that is needed for it to work properly. A stroke is when a place in the brain is not getting enough blood.

    Other Problems for People With Heart Disease

    • The arteries get hard, making it more difficult to move blood through the body.
    • An area of fat and cholesterol builds up, making the passageway for blood narrower. This makes it harder for blood to get to the body.

    Can You Catch Heart Disease?

    Heart disease is not an illness that is spreads by germs like a cold! There are risk factors that can increase a person’s chances of getting heart disease. Some of the risk factors cannot be controlled, such as getting older and having other people in the family with the disease. There are some risk factors that can be controlled, such as smoking, having high blood pressure, being overweight, or not exercising enough.

    How Do You Prevent Heart Disease?

    There are ways you can start to prevent heart disease even at your age. You can watch out for some of the risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and physical inactivity. As a child, you can watch what you eat and how much you are active.

    youth heart disease information

    Try to eat lots of fruits and vegetables — and if they are fresh, even better! Also, you should try to be as active as you can. Throughout the day, you should be active for at least an hour. You also want to be aware of how much time you are sitting in front of a screen, whether it is the TV, computer, tablet, or phone. This type of activity has little to no physical activity.

    Fun ways to be physically active include:

    • Riding your bike. You might be able to go for a bike ride in your neighborhood or at a nearby park.
    • Swimming. Join a swim team through your school or community. The Oldham County YMCA has an indoor pool so you can stay active even during winter.
    • Walking your dog. Physical activity is good for you and Fido too!

    Wally Cat wants you to know about heart disease because it affects so many people. He also wants you to start good habits to protect your heart, such as eating healthy and staying active.

    Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control. Wally Cat illustrations by Chris Ware (© University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences).

    Get Your Kids to Eat Their Veggies

    get kids to eat veggies

    Getting Children to Eat Their Veggies

    Do you hear “I don’t like vegetables!” during family dinner? According to research from the American Academy for Science and the Centers for Disease Control, children turn up their noses at vegetables because parents have not made them readily available. Let’s face it, few children will take the time to wash a head of broccoli or cauliflower, break the pieces apart, serve them up on a plate, and then eat them.

    Parents can increase the chances that their children will eat a particular vegetable if it is in a small container or individual plastic bag in the refrigerator. This makes vegetables an easy snack option for children to choose themselves.

    get kids eating veggies

    Children form food habits at an early age. Research shows a correlation between picky children and picky adults. It is important for parents to introduce good eating habits in children when they are young. It is, however, never too late to start.

    Tips to Get Children to Eat Vegetables

    Be a role model. Offer vegetables to children by eating them yourself. Let children approach them on their own.

    Set some rules. Children usually will accept vegetables in an environment where parents set appropriate rules. For example, it is okay to tell your child they need to taste a vegetable before they decide they do not like it.

    Stay positive. Using strategies such as punishment, threats, force, or even offering the child a reward have been shown to be unsuccessful ways of teaching children to eat vegetables. Vegetables should be offered in a relaxed environment.

    Don’t give up. Keep offering the vegetables. It might be helpful to offer the vegetable to the child in different ways or mixing the vegetable with other foods. Many parents throw in the towel after the child refuses a vegetable the first time, but understand that children generally have a fear of new foods. It may take about eight to ten tries with a vegetable before your child is ready to taste it. In addition, it may take a lot more tasting before your child gets to the point where he or she likes the vegetable. Be patient as your child experiences new foods.

    Be creative. Offer children vegetables in different forms (cooked, raw, and mixed with other foods) before you decide they do not like them.

    Be flexible. Children vary in how much they eat and what they like. Each child is an individual. Do not have predetermined ways in which your child should eat or accept vegetables.

    Be reasonable. Keep in mind that vegetable servings for children are smaller than vegetable servings for adults. A general guideline is one tablespoon of vegetable for each year of life. Do not have unrealistic expectations for your child.

    Give options. Offer a variety of vegetables at a particular meal. This allows children to be able to choose a vegetable they like.

    get your children to get their vegetables

    Take Action: Make it Happen

    Vegetables offers protection from many diseases, and thanks to the vitamins and minerals they provide, improves your child’s health. It is important for children to eat the recommended amount of vegetables daily.

    Parents, try these tricks to make vegetables more enticing to your children:

    • Offer vegetables daily. Children will not eat vegetables if parents do not cook and serve them.
    • Let children pick out a vegetable of the week at the grocery store.
    • Make vegetables easy for children to grab and eat. Have ready to eat vegetable snacks in small bags in the refrigerator.
    • Set out a plate of vegetables with dip before dinner or when children get home from school.
    • Prepare vegetables in a way in which they are tender but crisp. Children tend to dislike mushy vegetables and many prefer raw vegetables for this reason.
    • Include two vegetables at dinner; try offering both cooked and raw vegetables. This allows children to have a choice of vegetable they want to eat.
    • Add lettuce leaves to sandwiches.
    • Add blended vegetables such as spinach to spaghetti sauce, soups, and casserole. It is a good idea to blend or cut up the vegetable finely before adding it to spaghetti sauce. Children may not even notice the vegetable is there.
    • Make food fun. Let children create funny faces or animals with cut up vegetables.
    • Let children help prepare vegetable recipes; they generally enjoy what they have made.
    • Allow kids to make their own salad. Put out small bowls of baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, shredded leaf lettuce, raisins, fruit, and crunch noodles. They love the feeling of control that comes from doing it themselves.
    • Try heirloom vegetables. Kids get excited about interesting vegetables. Take your children to a farmer’s market and have them pick out the heirlooms they would like to try.

    getting kids to eat veggies

    Written by Ingrid Adams, Nutrition and Food Science Extension Specialist; Mallory Foster, Family and Consumer Sciences graduate student; and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

    Whooping Cough Fact Sheet

    Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

    You may have heard about the cases of whooping cough in Lexington. Although most persons you may meet are vaccinated against the illness, it is important to be aware of whooping cough, its symptoms, and treatment.

    Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a respiratory illness. It is very contagious. Pertussis vaccines are the most effective tool to prevent this illness, but like all vaccines, it is not 100% effective. This means that if whooping cough has been going through the community, there is still a chance that a fully vaccinated person can catch the illness. If a person has been vaccinated, however, the infection is usually not as bad for him or her.

    Whooping cough spreads from person to person through coughing, sneezing, or even being in close proximity to someone with the illness. Many people are infected with whooping cough by siblings, parents, or caregivers who do not even know they have the illness. Symptoms of the illness usually begin within five to ten days after being exposed but could take up to three weeks to manifest.

    Whooping Cough Symptoms

    There are two stages of symptoms for whooping cough: early stage and late stage.

    Early stage symptoms

    (First 1 to 2 weeks)

    • Runny nose
    • Low-grade fever (generally minimal throughout the course of the disease)
    • Mild, occasional cough
    • Apnea (pause in breathing) in babies

    Late stage symptoms

    (The traditional symptoms people associate with whooping cough)

    • Fits of many, rapid coughs followed by a high-pitched “whoop” on the inhale
    • Vomiting (throwing up) during or after coughing fits
    • Exhaustion after coughing fits

    Pertussis Symptoms for Babies

    Symptoms for babies are very different from older children and adults. Babies might not even have a cough or it could be a slight cough. They are also likely to show apnea (a long pause in breathing). This illness is very dangerous for babies. Information about babies who have the illness shows that about 50% of babies under one year need care in the hospital.

    What to Do if Seeing Symptoms

    If a school age child is showing symptoms, he or she should stay home from school and visit a healthcare provider. You should take your child to a healthcare provider even if he or she has been vaccinated. If your child has whooping cough, he or she will need to stay out of school until all antibiotics have been taken.

    If a person in your home has whooping cough, the healthcare provider may recommend that others in the home also take an antibiotic to prevent the spread of the illness.

    Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a contagious respiratory illness. Be on the watch for symptoms for you and your family and visit a healthcare provider should you think someone may have the illness.

    Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control.

    Spring OC 4-H News

    The following 4-H Youth Development articles printed in the Spring 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

    Attention: 4-H Participation Forms Due

    Please do not forget all 4-H members must be registered with Oldham County 4-H by April 15, 2017 in order to qualify to compete in any 4-H events. This requirement applies to all 4-H competitions including Horse Show, Horse Contest, and Dog Show as well as the Oldham County 4-H Fair.

    State 4-H Achievement Award Winners Announced

    Congratulations to the following Oldham County 4-H members for earning State Achievement Awards:

    Bronze Award
    Maggie Anderson
    Keirstin Kennedy
    Emmett King
    Ruby Mason
    Coral Schulte
    Ethan Willis

    Silver Award
    Noah Anderson
    Beth Huffman

    Gold Level Interviews
    Hannah Anderson
    Sarah Griffin
    Molly Logsdon
    Olivia Minor
    Karmen Woods

    Gold Level Interviews will be held on Saturday, March 4, in Clark County. Interviewing is the final step of the Gold Level Achievement Award. Gold Level Honorees will be announced the second week of March.

    oc 4h dog club

    Upcoming 4-H Dog Program Dates

    Take your dog to camp. Dog Camp is the perfect opportunity for 4-H’ers to work with their dogs one-on-one and in group instruction situations. The 2017 Kentucky State 4-H Dog Camp will be held at J.M. Feltner 4-H Camp from May 19 to 21. If you would like to receive registration information, contact the Oldham County Extension office at 222-9453, and we will send the information to you when it becomes available.

    The 4-H Dog Volunteer Certification Program will be available twice this fall. Volunteers can attend training on September 23 at McCracken County Extension office or November 4 at Wolfe County Extension office.

    Qualifying for Competitive 4-H Horse Events

    4-H members who would like to qualify to participate in any 4-H Competitive Horse Event (this includes 4-H Horse Shows) must complete six hours of instructional training taught or approved by their 4-H Certified Horse Club Leader. Please meet with your leader now to ensure completion of the six required hours of instruction prior to April 15th. Documentation must accompany your registration or show paperwork.

    oc 4h horse club

    Note upcoming competition 4-H horse events. The District 4-H Horse Show will be held June 2-4. State Horse Judging is June 14 with the State Horse Contest on June 15. The State Horse Show will be July 2-8.

    Start Thinking About the Oldham County Fair

    The 2017 Oldham County Fair will be August 1-5. Projects will be entered on July 27 at the Oldham County Extension office and will be available for pick up on August 5 at the Oldham County fairgrounds. Registration forms are due to the extension office by July 6. Remember, to be eligible to exhibit projects in the 4-H categories during the county fair, youth must be a registered 4-H member by April 15. Fairbook available online. Note major changes in Arts & Crafts and Photography categories.

    4-H Speech Program

    The following 4-H Youth Development article printed in the Spring 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

    oc 4h speech

    4-H Speech Program Inspires Confidence

    Public speaking is often one of our biggest fears. 4-H presents the opportunity for youth to conquer this fear at a young age by participating in the public speaking program. Public speaking skills help youth develop the confidence, organizational skills, and composure to become the influential leaders of tomorrow.

    It is important for young people to give 4-H public speaking a try. The earlier children begin the program, and the longer they stick with it, the stronger their public speaking skills will be. Youth are encouraged to deliver speeches on any topic they find interesting. The search for more information on the topic promotes valuable research skills. Composing the speech with proper structure teaches organizational skills. Young speakers also learn to use creative techniques to grab their audience’s attention.

    Competition begins at the club level, qualifying for the county competition on March 27. County winners advance to the April 15th district tournament. District champions advance to the state tournament in July at the University of Kentucky. Judges evaluate presentation and ability to clearly deliver a message.

    It’s not too late to get involved in a 4-H speech program! Call 222-9453 for details. Speakers can register online.

    HELP!! We need judges for the 4-H Communication Competitions on March 27 and April 15. Interested in volunteering to judge a speech or demonstration contest? Please contact Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent, at 222-9453. We need your help to make this a rewarding experience for our 4-H’ers!