Oldham County 4-H Summer Clubs

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

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Kids Cooking Camp

June 26 and 27, from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., is the All American Kids Cooking Camp! Boys and girls between the ages of nine and twelve will learn beginning cooking skills in his fun, hands-on program.

Registration is limited, taken on a first-come first-served basis, and cannot be completed without payment. The $20 supply fee includes lunch. Go online to oldham.ca.uky.edu/Kids-Cooking-Camp for further information.

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Summer Gardening Club

Boys and girls ages nine through thirteen, get in the garden with 4-H! We have four club gardening days planned for this summer:

  • Vegetable Gardens on June 19
  • Butterfly Gardens on June 26
  • Pizza Gardens on July 10 (For this project, you will also need to bring a container at least 24 inches in diameter and 10 inches deep)
  • Butterfly Houses on July 24

To signup for 4-H Summer Gardening Club, send the flyer, 4-H participation form, and $25 supply fee to Oldham County Extension, 1815 North Highway 393, La Grange, KY 40031. Registration materials available online at oldham.ca.uky.edu/4h-horticulture-club.

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Love Chickens?

Oldham County 4-H is currently organizing a Poultry Club! The club will focus on learning about chickens, although you do not need to own one yourself in order to participate. Would your child like to join? Are you interesting in volunteering with the club?

For more information, please contact 4-H Agent Kelly Woods via (502) 222-9453 or kwoods@uky.edu.

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent, and Lauren Fernandez,Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

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Oldham County 4-H Champions

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Gold Award Winners

Congrats to Hannah Anderson, Beth Huffman, and Olivia Minor on receiving the 2018 4-H Gold Achievement Award!

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This competitive program involves an application as well as a panel interview portion. These Oldham County members are 3 of the 30 that were selected from across the state to represent Kentucky 4-H. Gold Competitive Achievement winners receive a full scholarship to 4-H Teen Conference at the University of Kentucky in June and an $800 scholarship towards attending National 4-H Congress Conference.

In addition, Beth placed in the top 10 and will interview for the Emerald Award College Scholarship at the University of Kentucky in June.

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4-H Communications Champions

At the Oldham County Communications night in March, the following 4-H’ers earned champion ribbons:

*Olivia Baker
Age 9 Speech
“Amazing Abigail Adams”
*Brady Rutledge
Age 10 Speech
“Healthy Body, Healthy Mind”
*Ava Breeding
Age 11 Speech
“Grit is the Way to Go”
Carrie Olds
Age 12 Speech
“Concussion”
*Ella Olds
Age 14 Speech
“Scuba Diving”
Chanrahaas Kona
Age 16 Speech
“The Development of UBI”
Hannah Anderson
Age 17 Speech
“Tweeting the Classics”
*Kendall Kennedy
Age 10 Arts Demonstration
“How to Make Slime”
*Hunter Fackler
Junior Mock Job Interviews

The 4-H’ers denoted with asterisks (*) were champions in the District Communications Event, hosted by Shelby County in April. They are eligible to participate in the State 4-H Communications competition at the University of Kentucky on July 14.

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Congratulations to all our fantastic 4-H’ers on their spectacular performances at this year’s Communications events, and best of luck to the participants that will be moving on to the state event this summer!

State Dog Bowl Results

In March, the Leaders of the Pack, Oldham County 4-H Dog Club, participated in the 2018 State 4-H Dog Bowl and Skillathon. Congratulations to the following 4-H’ers for their achievements.

Carrie Olds, Chloe Hardesty, Caecilia Isenhart, and Freya Isenhart were the Grand Champion Junior Dog Bowl Team.

Beth Huffman earned 2nd in the Individual Senior Skillathon competition.

Carrie Olds placed 3rd in Individual Junior.

oc dog champs

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent, and Lauren Fernandez,Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

2018 Oldham County Master Gardener Classes

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources article originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

oc ky master gardeners

Master Gardener Classes

We are gauging interest for the next Master Gardener volunteer program, anticipated to begin in September. The program includes 12 classes that meet weekly, covering botany, soils, entomology, plant pathology, and other foundation topics. The cost for the program is $100, and partial scholarships to cover this fee are available. If you are interested, please call our office or send an email to lauren.state@uky.edu.

Master Gardener classes are designed for those who wish to become certified volunteers. Graduates complete 40 hours of service work and continuing education within one year of class completion in order to become certified Master Gardeners.

In subsequent years, Master Gardeners must complete at least 20 hours of volunteer service, plus 10 hours of continuing education to maintain certification.

oc ky master gardeners

Master Gardener volunteers may choose to join the Oldham County Master Gardener Association. The association is a great networking resource and facilitates completion of volunteer hours. Oldham County Master Gardener Association also organizes and helps teach gardening programs for the public. Learn about upcoming Master Gardener programs at: oldham.ca.uky.edu/OC-Master-Gardeners.

oldham county gardening classes

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent, and Lauren Fernandez,Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Celebrating Extension Leaders

The following article originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Award & Leader Recognition Program

In March, we celebrated recent state-level achievements of our volunteers and clients with a recognition program at the John Black Community Center.

oc 4h family

Karen Horton is our Extension Leader of the Year! She has led our 4-H Cloverbuds Club for five years, volunteered at 4-H summer camp, and supported Oldham County youth in countless other ways.

ag leader awards

Jon Bednarski and Tee Ray received Ag Water Quality Leader Awards for their outstanding conservation efforts. Both of these gentlemen have been featured in Kentucky Extension promotional videos for ag water quality, viewable online at www.youtube.com/user/UKAgriculture.

oc extension leader awards

Barbara Rosenman received the Friend of Extension Award. As Director of Oldham County Animal Control, she dealt with both domesticated animals and livestock. She has taught Extension programs and helped educate clients about leash laws, spay/neuter programs, and livestock laws.

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent, and Lauren Fernandez,Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Classes on Cooking, Gardening, Sewing & More

The following Family & Consumer Sciences articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Homemaker Lessons – Open to the Public

Louisville Area Needlework • March 13, Shelby County Extension

Learn about Silk Ribbon, Cross Stitch, Basic Needle, Crewel Embroidery, and Creative Stitchery. Pick up an information packet at the Oldham County Extension Office, or contact us for the registration materials. Registration is due Thursday, March 8, to the Bullitt County Extension Office.

health classes

Couch Potato Challenge • March 22, 10:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension

A 12-week set of walking challenges based on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institutes’ walking plan, this program helps you get started walking at a pace that is comfortable for you! RSVP via (502) 222-9453.

gardening in small spaces

Gardening in Small Spaces • April 26, 10:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension

Gardening is one of America’s most popular hobbies, and rightly so. Gardening activities help promote healthy habits. The physical activity of working in the garden burns calories. As well, consuming home-grown vegetables is good for your health. Lesson taught by Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agent. Save your seat by emailing lauren.state@uky.edu or calling (502) 222-9453.

Come Sew With Us

Sewing classes are free and open to the public! All ages welcome — youth must be accompanied by an adult. The project of the day is not mandatory; you are encouraged to bring your own project to work on. Project supply lists are available online. Please call and reserve your seat.

Monograming • Monday, March 26, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Gardening & Outdoor Accessories • Monday, April 23, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.

oldham county sewing class

Cooking for Diabetics & Everyone Else Too!

Making healthy food choices is part of managing diabetes. At 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, April 11, learn about cooking healthy, easy meals that are both economical and tasty. This free class takes place at the Oldham County Extension Office. Call (502) 222-9453 to reserve your seat.

Looking Ahead to Summer

Mark your calendars! Canning Boot Camp will premiere at 6:30 p.m. on June 7, to be repeated at 10:00 a.m. on June 8.

Jefferson County is hosting this year’s Louisville Area Homemakers Annual Meeting on Monday, June 25. The meeting will be held at Riverside, The Farnsley-Moremen Landing, located at 7410 Moorman Road in Louisville. Watch your email for more details.

Kids’ Cooking Camp is scheduled for June 26 and 27. Further details to be announced.

Written by Chris Duncan, Family & Consumer Sciences Agent, and Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Protecting Water is for Everyone

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

no-mow zones protect water

Protecting Water – Not Just for Farmers

For many folks, the topic of water quality sounds less than glamorous. But paying attention to our management practices, whether on a farm or in our own back yards, is critical to protect water. The things we do in our pastures, crops, gardens, and lawns can negatively affect our water supply. What can you do to protect water?

  • Use buffer zones and no-mow zones to protect water sources. These zones are areas where fertilizers and pesticides are not applied. No-mow zones encourage natural return of native plants with increased ability to hold the soil in place and prevent erosion.
  • Plant native plants along water edges to help hold soil in place. Native plants are extremely long-rooted compared to lawn grasses and most cultivated flowers.
  • Don’t overstock or overgraze pastures. When overgrazing occurs, soils easily erode, carrying manure with it. And lost topsoil cannot be recovered.
  • Repair failing septic systems. Sometimes cost-share funds to repair these are available from local watershed groups.
  • Don’t apply fertilizer unless soil test shows a need for it.
  • Don’t apply pesticides (weed killers, insect killers, etc.) unless a pest problem has been identified.

A great resource for farmers is UK’s Ag Water Quality Planning website. This site includes an online tool to create an Ag Water Quality Plan, and it features videos of two Oldham County farms: TNT Farms and Sherwood Acres.

Homeowners can benefit from reading ‘Living Along a Kentucky Stream.’ Printed guides are available in our office.

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Ag Agent.

Spring Gardening News

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Two Problem Weeds – Control Them Now

Poison hemlock and Buttercup are two problem weeds that can be controlled in March with herbicide sprays. An herbicide containing 2,4-D as the active ingredient is usually the most economical spray choice that will give good control.

Poison hemlock can be found in pastures, hay fields, and on roadsides. It has a biennial life cycle, meaning each plant lives for two years. This weed spreads by producing many seeds. While mowing can prevent seed formation and spread of this weed, the plant is toxic to livestock. So care should be taken to control it in pastures and hay fields. The poison hemlock in this photo was growing around an old tree stump, adjacent to a hay field. Spraying this patch now will save headaches down the road.

Buttercup is a problem mostly in overgrazed pastures. There are several types of buttercup in Kentucky, and leaf shapes may look different than what’s pictured here. Buttercup is also toxic to livestock. Best control is achieved when sprayed before these plants begin blooming, which is tricky since these may go unnoticed until flowering. Scouting pastures by walking diagonally or zigzagging through each will give a good overview of what’s growing.

When it comes to toxic plants, it’s important to note that animals usually don’t choose to graze these unless they are limited on good forages. But sometimes they don’t read the book and may graze on these plants out of curiosity.

The UK Weeds page is a great resource for more information, including videos and weed identification guides: weedscience.ca.uky.edu/forages

Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Training Has Changed

Kentucky Extension agents are in the process of being certified to teach the new ‘Produce Best Practices Training‘ which replaces GAP training for vegetable and fruit growers.

Note that video training is no longer available. Any producer needing this training must attend a live presentation, given by a certified trainer. If you completed GAP training in the past, your diploma is valid until January 1, 2019.

Please help spread the word to fellow growers. Check the new Kentucky Farmers Market manual online for details. At time of print, there are currently two trainings scheduled here and nearby. Call (502) 222-9453 to register or to get information on other sessions in other counties.

  • Oldham County Extension Office March 10, 9:00 a.m.
  • Shelby County Extension Office April 12, 9:00 a.m.

Interesting Insect Pests

A client recently sent this photo for identification. While cultivating the soil in his vegetable high tunnel, he found these insect pupae about four inches deep in the ground. University of Kentucky Entomology confirmed that these are the pupal stage of the tomato hornworm.

garden pest tomato hornworm

There are typically two or three generations of this pest each year, with the final generation overwintering in the soil and emerging as a moth in spring. The adult stage of this pest belongs to the insect family often called Sphinx or Hawk Moths. This family also includes the unusual hummingbird moth.

During the caterpillar stage, the tomato hornworm feeds on tomato plants and fruits and can cause substantial yield loss. Tips for controlling hornworms and other garden pests are included online in the UK Home Vegetable Gardening Guide. Print copies of this guide are available at the office.

Photos of the caterpillar and moth stage of the tomato hornworm are available online at UK Entomology or by searching ‘Kentucky Critter Files.’

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Ag Agent.

Opportunites for 4-H’ers and Volunteers

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

4-H Speech Program Builds Confidence

Public speaking is one of Americans’ biggest fears. 4-H presents the opportunity for youth to conquer this fear at a young age by participating in the public speaking program. By learning public speaking skills, youth will have the confidence, organizational skills and composure to become the influential leaders of tomorrow.

The important thing is for young people to give 4-H public speaking a try. The earlier they begin the program and the longer they stick with it, the stronger their public speaking skills will be. Youth can deliver speeches on any topic they find interesting. As they look for more information on the topic, they develop valuable research skills. They also learn organizational skills by composing the speech and giving it the proper structure. Finally, they must use creative techniques to get the audience’s attention.

Competition begins at the club level qualifying for the county competition on March 26th. County winners advance to a district tournament on April 14th, and district winners advance to a state tournament, held in July at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Judges evaluate the presentation and the speaker’s ability to clearly deliver a message. It’s not too late to get involved in a 4-H speech program! Call (502) 222-9453 for details.

HELP! We need judges for the Communication Competitions on March 26 and April 14. If you are interested in volunteering to judge a speech or demonstration contest, please contact Kelly Woods at (502) 222-9453. We need your help to make this a rewarding experience for our 4-H’ers!

backyard chickens 101

Got Chickens?

If your family is interested in keeping chickens, your first step should be attending the “Chickens 101” workshop. The first session on March 1 focuses on Breed Selection, Chick Care, Housing and Predator Control. Get the rundown on Health and Nutrition at the second session on March 8. Please call (502) 222-9453 or email traci.missun@uky.edu to register.

Oldham County Extension would like to organize a 4-H Poultry Club. If your child wants to join or you are interested in leading the club, please contact Kelly Woods via (502) 222-9453 or kwoods@uky.edu.

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Volunteer at the 4-H Reality Store

South Oldham High School 4-H Reality Store will be held on Friday, April 20th. We need volunteers to make this event possible. Contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Office via (502) 222-9453 or kwoods@uky.edu if you can help out!

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent.

Extension Builds Healthy Kentuckians

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the November 9, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

extension builds healthy Kentuckians

FCS Extension Builds Strong, Healthy Kentuckians

In Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Extension, we help individuals develop the skills they need to improve quality of life for themselves and their families. We offer a variety of educational programs throughout the year, including cooking and nutrition classes, sewing workshops, financial stability talks, and much more. In the past programming year, we reached more than 1.6 million Kentuckians.

These programs have made a meaningful impact across the state. Our Truth and Consequences Program, which focuses on the realities of substance abuse, has changed the lives of young Kentuckians. In a recent survey, more than 400 of them reported that they know of peers who no longer engage in substance abuse because of the program.

tips for getting healthy

Extension offers health-related programs for all age groups that focus on eating healthy and increasing physical activity. Due to these efforts, more than 12,000 Kentuckians made a lifestyle change to improve their health. FCS Extension agents also work closely with local farmers markets to promote fresh produce consumption. By conducting Plate It Up Kentucky Proud food demonstrations and offering recipe cards during the markets, agents increased Kentucky farmers market sales by more than $17,000. Oldham County FCS Agent Chris Duncan partnered with Oldham County Fiscal Court to bring food demonstrations and nutrition tips to Oldham County TV. “Cooking With Chris” can be found online by visiting www.oldhamcounty.net/oldham-county-tv.

Educating low-income families on the benefits of healthier eating and buying fresh foods resulted in redemption of more than $61,000 in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; Women, Infants and Children; or senior benefits at the state’s farmers markets. To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget.

Oldham County Extension also brings nutrition education to inmates in the substance abuse program at Roederer Correctional. Lessons focus on preparing the men for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Through various career preparation programs, we spread knowledge that helps Kentuckians attain employment or find a more fulfilling job. In the past year, more than 43,000 people used practical living skills learned through FCS Extension to advance their education or employment.

We are home to a vibrant group of Extension Homemakers. These members engage in numerous outreach projects to better their communities and Kentucky. One such project is the ovarian cancer screening fundraising program. Each year, Extension Homemakers contribute to this UK Markey Cancer Center program, which provides free ovarian cancer screenings to Kentucky women. Since fundraising began 40 years ago, Extension Homemakers have given $1.4 million to that effort. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also contribute to Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

For more information on local Family and Consumer Sciences programs, contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can also visit us online at oldham.ca.uky.edu.

extension food safety classes

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Jennifer Hunter, Interim Assistant Director of Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Supporting Oldham County Agriculture

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

“If it wasn’t for 4-H I do not think I would have developed the skills that have helped me take care of my own horse, and I would not have gained the knowledge that is helping me [study pre-veterinary science.]”
– Oldham County 4-H alumni

Supporting Oldham’s #1 Ag Commodity

The 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey reported a total value of Oldham County’s equine and equine-related assets of $163 million. Oldham County ranks 4th in Kentucky in value of equine sold, 5th in equine operation income, 6th in value of equine and equine acres, and 7th in equine population.

Oldham County Extension supports farm managers and horse owners through site visits to help troubleshoot problems and improve pastures and horse health. This includes improving pastures through reseeding, fertility management, weed control, and grazing management; improving horse diets; and hay testing.

The Extension Service also provides equine programs on worming, pasture management, vaccinations, showmanship, and tack care. Between July 2016 and June 2017, the county 4-H and agriculture agents, as well as numerous community equine professionals and veterinarians, taught seven educational sessions to 4-H members and horse owners. Thirty-six repeat attendees learned valuable horse care information that improved health and safety of both horse and rider.

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Oldham County 4-H’ers at the Kentucky State 4-H Horse Show.

Through monthly educational meetings, 4-H horse club members build social and emotional skills like accountability, empathy, leadership, and confidence.

Beef Field Day

In Oldham County, pasture makes up 32% of available farmland and provides grazing for livestock. Livestock are important to Oldham County’s economy, with cattle alone representing over 2.4 million dollars in sales in 2012, according to the Census of Agriculture.

Because of the importance and prevalence of cattle production in the area, agriculture extension agents in Oldham, Trimble, Henry, and Shelby Counties have organized and held annual Regional Beef Field Days for farmers since 2005. These field days offer farmers an opportunity to see how production practices work on other farms. Field days also promote implementation of new practices that improve production efficiency while protecting natural resources, which are goals outlined in the county plan of work.

In 2016, this event was held at an Oldham County Farm. During the field day, 250 Louisville area producers attended and learned about:

  • Heavy Use Feeding Areas and Other Conservation Practices that Protect Soil and Water
  • Proper Handling Facilities to Minimize Animal Stress
  • Good Herd Health Practices and Update on Antibiotics Use

Farms make up one-half of total land acreage in Oldham County.

“Looking at the handling facilities setup helped me decide on changes needed for my own system.”
– Oldham County farmer

Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.