Summer 2017 FCS Events

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources calendar printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

All activities are held at the Oldham County Extension office unless otherwise noted.

June FCS Calendar

5 Homemaker Executive Board, 9:30 a.m.
8 Canning Boot Camp, 6:30 p.m.
9 Canning Boot Camp, 10:00 a.m.
13 FCS Council, 10:00 a.m.
16 Homemakers Club Reports due to Extension Office
21 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, La Grange Community Center, 1:00 p.m.
30 Homemaker Volunteer Hours due to Extension Office

July FCS Calendar

4 Office closed for Independence Day
10-12 Kids Cooking Camp
19 Wednesday Quilters, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
19 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, La Grange Community Center, 1:00 p.m.
24 County Fair Entry Day (Non-Perishables), 1:00 – 7:00 p.m.
25 County Fair Entry Day (Non-Perishables), 9:00 a.m. – noon
31 County Fair Entry Day (Culinary), 9:00 a.m. – noon

August FCS Calendar

1-5 Oldham County Fair
6 County Fair Entry Check Out, Oldham County Fairgrounds, noon – 2:00 p.m.
8 Extension Foundation, 9:00 a.m.
16 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, La Grange Community Center, 1:00 p.m.
TBA Homemakers Council

Summer 2017 Ag Events

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources calendar printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

All activities are held at the Oldham County Extension office unless otherwise noted. Please call to RSVP for classes held at extension offices.

June Ag Calendar

1 Master Cattleman, 6:00 p.m.
8 County Extension Council, 9:00 a.m.
8 Extension District Board, 10:00 a.m.
8 Equine Farm & Facilities Expo, Lexington, University of Kentucky Extension Forages
9 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30 p.m.
12 Green Thumbs, contact office for details
15 Master Cattleman, 6:00 p.m.
20 Ag Development Council, 7:00 p.m.
24 Master Gardener Association Meeting and Rain Garden Work Day, 9:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension Pavilion

July Ag Calendar

4 Office closed for Independence Day
6 Master Cattleman, 6:00 p.m., Henry County Extension
6 I Love Roses, 6:30 p.m., Oldham County Public Library, La Grange. Guest speaker Janet Miller of the Louisville Rose Society. Sponsored by Oldham County Master Gardener Association.
10 Green Thumbs, Contact office for details
14 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30 p.m.
17 How Flowers Flirt and Flourish, 6:30 p.m., Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve, Goshen. Guest speaker Tavia Cathcart Brown, Wildflower Expert and Author. Sponsored by Oldham County Master Gardener Association.
18 Oldham County Cattlemen, 6:00 p.m.
20 Master Cattleman, 6:00 p.m., Shelby County Extension
31 Ag Exhibits Entry for County Fair, 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., (NEW LOCATION: Oldham County Extension office)

August Ag Calendar

3 Late Summer/Early Fall Gardening, 10:00 a.m. Guest speaker Jeff Wallitsch, Wallitsch Nursery and Garden Center. Sponsored by Oldham County Master Gardener Association.
3 Master Cattleman, 6:00 p.m.
8 Extension Foundation, 9:00 a.m.
10 Rinse & Return for Pesticide Containers, 9:00 a.m. – 12 noon
11 Oldham County Beekeepers, 7:30 p.m.
16 Master Gardener/Green Thumbs Outing, Streamcliff Farms

Summer 2017 4-H Events

The following 4-H Youth Development calendar printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

June 4-H Calendar

2-4 District Horse Show
5 All 4-H Camp Forms Due
5 Teen Conference Orientation
6 Project Day: 2-Point Perspective
8 Project Day: Leaf Printing
8 Extension Council & District Board
9 Project Day: Making An Electromagnet
12 Robotics Club
12-15 Teen Conference
16 Project Day: 4-H Clover Photography
15-16 State Horse Contest
20 Camp Leader Orientation
22 Camper Orientation

July 4-H Calendar

2-8 State Horse Show
4 Office closed for Independence Day
8 State Communications Day
10-12 Kids Cooking Camp
13 4-H Council Meeting
14 Head Lice Checks for Camp
17-21 4-H Camp
27 Fair Project Entry Day

August 4-H Calendar

2 4-H Fashion Revue
1-5 Oldham County Fair
11 State Fair Projects to Office
12-13 State Fair Dog Show
17-27 Kentucky State Fair

Oldham County Dog Show details to be announced.

2017 State Homemaker News

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

State Homemaker Meeting News

Six Oldham County Extension Homemakers attended the 2017 State Annual Meeting in Owensboro: Clarine Anderson, Dottie Crouch, Faye Korthaus, Carol McKinnon, Angela Morris, and Paula Pascal. Oldham County was honored to receive third place in International Fundraiser, Coins for Change.

state homemakers meeting news

Carol C. Russ, a new Poplar Grove member, received third place for her short story “My Mother’s Shoes.” Rebecca Starry won two grand champion ribbons in Beading and Jewelry. Pat Honaker received grand champion in Crochet. Kelly Boyd, Linda Kiekhefer, Faye Korthaus, Barb Lynch, Angela Morris, Barbara Lynch, and Peggy Townsend all received blue ribbons for their Cultural Arts entries.

keha cultural arts

Save the date! The 2018 KEHA State Annual Meeting will be May 7-9 at the Crowne Plaza Louisville Airport. In addition to competition in the State Cultural Arts contest, the KEHA State meeting is a great time to meet members from all over the state and learn lots of wonderful things.

2017 Master Gardener Classes

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources article printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Master Gardener Classes Begin in September

Master Gardener classes will be offered Fridays, beginning September 1 through November 17. Classes will meet from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the extension office. The cost for this program is $100 to cover class materials. Registration forms are available in our office as well as online at oldham.ca.uky.edu/OC-Master-Gardeners.

oldham county master gardeners

What is a Master Gardener? A Master Gardener is someone who has successfully completed Master Gardener classes offered by an extension office. Classes provide research-based information on core subjects ranging from botany to soils to plant pests. Trees, turf, and landscape plant growing principles are also covered. Master Gardener volunteers take the knowledge learned through these classes and put it to use in their communities – sharing knowledge informally with others, teaching, and doing various gardening-related work in public areas.

How do I become a Master Gardener? Complete classes offered at the extension office and complete 40 hours of volunteer service within one year of course completion. Volunteers complete 20 service hours annually in subsequent years to maintain active Master Gardener status.

oldham county master gardeners

Where can I volunteer? There are several ongoing volunteer opportunities at Yew Dell Gardens and Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve, plus one-time opportunities that are announced throughout the year. Participants may help with an existing project or begin their own. A project can be as simple as helping plant or maintain your church’s landscape or providing plant recommendations for a neighborhood association common area. The possibilities are endless.

Landscape Help Publications Available

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources and Horticulture articles printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

New/Updated Landscape Publications Available

New and updated publications covering landscape topics are now available. These Kentucky Extension publications and others covering lawn care, flower gardens, vegetables, and fruit are accessible online at www.uky.edu/hort/home-horticulture and at the extension office.

kentucky landscape help

Soil Percolation, A Key to Survival of Landscape Plants’ details the effect of soil quality on the success of your landscape planting, covering ways to evaluate and improve your soil as well as the importance of selecting of the right plant to fit your soil type.

Planting Container Grown Trees and Shrubs’ covers information about handling containers grown plants and proper planting technique to insure the success of your landscape.

Planting Bareroot Trees in Your Landscape.’ Planting bareroot trees has always been a technique used to move young trees in landscapes and fruit orchards. This publication covers the proper handling and planting methods of bareroot plants for success.

‘After Your Ash Tree Dies, Making an Informed Decision on What to Replant’ will give you resources to decide what tree varieties mature similar in size to the ash and provide diversity to your landscape.

kentucky landscape help

‘What is Your Tree Worth?’ Landscape trees can add to the value of your property if undamaged, healthy, and planted in an appropriate location. This publication describes how to have your trees evaluated to determine their value in your landscape.

Get Help With Pond Weeds

A common problem for pond owners is control of weedy plants. Correctly identifying the plant is the first step in managing it. Scoop up problem weeds in a bucket and bring to our office for identification and control tips. Keeping pond weeds in water helps preserve them for accurate identification. An open container is best because it keeps the sample fresher. A closed container can be used for same day delivery to our office, but plants will begin decaying if kept enclosed multiple days, especially in a hot environment.

4-H Summer Programs

The following 4-H Youth Development articles printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Solar Eclipse Camp

total solar eclipse

Solar Eclipse Camp will be August 18-21 at the West Kentucky 4-H Camp in Dawson Springs, Kentucky. A premiere viewing location, the camp sits directly in the path of the TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE!

Ages 9 through 18 are eligible to attend. The $250 camp fee includes all activities, lodging, meals, snacks, t-shirt, and special solar eclipse viewing glasses. Participants experience a space-themed camp with class options that include:

  • Weather
  • Rockets
  • Drones
  • Astronomy
  • Space exploration
  • And more!
  • Special guests from NASA, TV meteorologists, and astronomers are scheduled.

    For more information contact Shane Browning, West Kentucky Camp Director, via (270) 797-8758 or shanebrowning@uky.edu.

    Kentucky Forestry, Entomology, and Wildlife Leadership Program

    Interested in the environment? Want to know more about forests, trees, insects, water, and wildlife? If yes, then the Forestry, Entomology, and Wildlife Leadership Program is for you!

    Students who have completed their sophomore or junior year of high school are eligible to participate. The program will be held from June 4 through 9 at Lake Cumberland Education Center in Jabez, Kentucky. More information is available online at kflp.ca.uky.edu.

    Summer Project Days

    Join 4-H during the summer for Project Days where we build and create interesting, creative projects that can be entered in the fair to win ribbons and premiums! View the Fair Catalog online at oldham.ca.uky.edu/4h-fair or at the extension office during fair season. Registration for fair entries should be submitted to the Oldham County Extension office by July 5.

    Registration information for Summer Project Days is available online: oldham.ca.uky.edu/4h-project-days

    oc 4-h project days

    Discover Two-Point Perspective Drawing! Learn to write your name using two-point perspective, and make a beautiful piece of art that you can enter in the fair and then hang in your room. This class takes place from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 6. The supply fee is $5.

    Learn about Kentucky trees in Leaf Printing! Participants will identify 10 leaves and their primary uses, then make a notebook of leaf prints displaying their new knowledge. Leaf Printing is scheduled for Thursday, June 8, between 1:00 and 3:00 p.m. with a supply fee of $5.

    Making an Electromagnet will be the subject of the class on Friday, June 9, between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. Learn about electricity using Snap Circuits, then mount your own electromagnet. $10 covers all necessary supplies.

    The last 4-H Project Day of the summer will be from 10:00 a.m. to noon on Friday, June 16. In 4-H Clover Photography, you will express your unique style by designing your own 3D 4-H Clover and photographing it! This class has a $5 supply fee.

    Youth Heart Disease Information

    youth heart disease info

    Heart Disease

    Youth Health Bulletin

    Have you ever heard that someone you know has heart disease? It is a very common illness, and in fact, more than 60 million Americans have it. Wally Cat wants to make sure you know what heart disease is and how you can take care of your heart.

    What is Heart Disease?

    Heart disease is also known as cardiovascular disease. As you may have guessed, a person who has heart disease has problems with their heart and blood vessels — they are not working the way they should.

    There are many problems that people with heart disease have, such as high blood pressure and chest pains. People with heart disease are also more likely to have heart attacks and strokes. A heart attack is when there is a blockage of blood flow to the heart. This means that the heart is not getting the blood that is needed for it to work properly. A stroke is when a place in the brain is not getting enough blood.

    Other Problems for People With Heart Disease

    • The arteries get hard, making it more difficult to move blood through the body.
    • An area of fat and cholesterol builds up, making the passageway for blood narrower. This makes it harder for blood to get to the body.

    Can You Catch Heart Disease?

    Heart disease is not an illness that is spreads by germs like a cold! There are risk factors that can increase a person’s chances of getting heart disease. Some of the risk factors cannot be controlled, such as getting older and having other people in the family with the disease. There are some risk factors that can be controlled, such as smoking, having high blood pressure, being overweight, or not exercising enough.

    How Do You Prevent Heart Disease?

    There are ways you can start to prevent heart disease even at your age. You can watch out for some of the risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and physical inactivity. As a child, you can watch what you eat and how much you are active.

    youth heart disease information

    Try to eat lots of fruits and vegetables — and if they are fresh, even better! Also, you should try to be as active as you can. Throughout the day, you should be active for at least an hour. You also want to be aware of how much time you are sitting in front of a screen, whether it is the TV, computer, tablet, or phone. This type of activity has little to no physical activity.

    Fun ways to be physically active include:

    • Riding your bike. You might be able to go for a bike ride in your neighborhood or at a nearby park.
    • Swimming. Join a swim team through your school or community. The Oldham County YMCA has an indoor pool so you can stay active even during winter.
    • Walking your dog. Physical activity is good for you and Fido too!

    Wally Cat wants you to know about heart disease because it affects so many people. He also wants you to start good habits to protect your heart, such as eating healthy and staying active.

    Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control. Wally Cat illustrations by Chris Ware (© University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences).

    Organ Donation Facts and Fiction

    Organ Donation: Did You Know?

    There are many myths about organ donation. These myths may result in someone not wanting to be a donor. Learn a little more about common myths and whether there is any truth to them.

    organ donor

    Myth 1: If I have a chronic medical condition, I cannot be a donor.

    Fact: Regardless of your medical history, you can sign up to be a donor. There are actually a few conditions in which a donation would not be possible. These include HIV infection, active cancer, or infection that affected the whole body. If a person is listed as a donor, the transplant team will determine if a donation of possible at the time of the donor’s death.

    organ donation

    Myth 2: If I am at a hospital and the healthcare team sees that I am a donor, they will not try to save my life.

    Fact: When a person is admitted to the hospital, the healthcare team’s priority is to take care of the person and save their life if needed. Donation of organs is not part of the conversation until all other lifesaving methods have been used.

    Myth 3: People who have a lot of money or are famous get to the top of the waiting list faster than anyone else.

    Fact: There is a national computer system that works to match up donors and recipients. The match comes from comparing the donor and medical information of the receiver of the organs. Blood type, type spent waiting, and geographical location all come under consideration as well. How much money a person has, their race, or celebrity status are never used to determine recipients.

    organ donor

    Myth 4: There are people out there who could take my organs and sell them.

    Fact: In the United States, there are federal laws that ban the buying and selling of human organs. A person or company that breaks these laws can be fined or given prison sentences.

    Myth 5: If I donate organs, my family cannot have an open casket at the funeral.

    Fact: When organs are donated, a body is treated with care throughout the process. In most cases, an open casket funeral is possible for those who donate organs, tissues, and even eyes.

    organ donor health bulletin

    Donating organs can be a big decision but could save many lives. Don’t let myths about donation stop you from being an organ donor.

    Source material from U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation. Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Originally published by Kentucky Extension in the April 2017 Adult Health Bulletin.

    KY Spring Native Flowers

    Home to over twenty-five hundred plant species, Kentucky is a veritable wildflower garden. Kentucky native spring flowers include bloodroot, spring beauty, and Virginia bluebells.

    KY native wildflower

    Bloodroot

    Spring Kentucky Native Flower

    One of the earliest blooming wildflowers in Kentucky, bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) appears in the late winter and early spring. This native wildflower gets its name from its red-orange rhizome and the red juice that can be squeezed from it. Native Americans used bloodroot to treat fever, ulcers, ringworm, and skin infections. It finds use in dye-making and is also being studied for possible anti-cancer properties. Bloodroot, however, is toxic when ingested, causing vomiting and loss of consciousness.

    Bloodroot can be planted from seed or through root division. It can grow in sun or shade as long as rich, moist soil is available. You will find this short wildflower in both Kentucky’s woodlands and open fields. Bloodroot’s white flowers, yellow stamens at the center, are about an inch and a half to two inches across. A single round leaf accompanies each flower.

    KY wildflowers in blooms

    Spring Beauty

    Kentucky Spring Wildflower

    Spring beauty (Claytonia Virginica) is another of Kentucky’s early spring wildflowers. Less than a foot in height, the small white to pink flowers emerge before the trees begin to leaf out. Spring beauty opens in the morning to take in the sun’s warmth and closes again each evening. Its inconspicuous leaves blend in with surrounding grasses. Like many wildflowers, its loveliness is fading, blooms lasting only a couple weeks.

    Claytonia readily reseeds itself and can be found soaking up the sun across the eastern United States. Gardeners can collect the seeds to bring a little spring beauty to their own gardens.

    Spring beauty owes its name to John Clayton, an eighteenth century naturalist who so impressed Benjamin Franklin that the founding father “granted him free mail privileges for shipping his plants and letters.”

    KY wildflowers in bloom

    Virginia Bluebells

    Ephemeral KY Native Wildflower

    When traversing Kentucky’s woodlands in the early spring, you may encounter Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica), also called cowslip or mertensia. Virginia bluebells flourish in sandy and loamy soil and can often be found along creeks and other waterways. Nurseries and seed catalogs also carry these spring beauties. The nodding, bell-shaped wildflowers vary from blue to purple to pink. The inch-long trumpets bloom in clusters. Bluebells grow to a height of one to two feet, and if the growing conditions are right, they may quickly spread and naturalize. Bees, butterflies, and moths all pollinate them.

    This Kentucky native wildflower springs up after the last hard frost in March or April. A spring ephemeral, Virginia bluebells only bloom for two to three weeks before going to seed. The foliage dies back by early summer. Mass plantings are breath-taking while Virginia bluebells are in bloom, but they are short-lived and may leave a “hole” in your landscape once they have died back. Keep this transience in mind when planting bluebells in your garden.

    Virginia bluebells were a favorite of Thomas Jefferson’s and still grow at the Monticello today.

    KY Rain Garden Wildflowers

    Kentucky Wildflowers

    Native Plants Attract Butterflies and Bees

    Interested in planting wildflowers for pollinators? Bloodroot, spring beauty, and Virginia bluebells all attract butterflies and bees.

    For more information on using native plants to attract butterflies, check out the following resources:

    oldham county kentucky gardening

    Oldham County Gardening

    Upcoming Gardening Classes

    Oldham County Extension offers educational classes, the following of which are free and open to the public. RSVP for an upcoming gardening class in Oldham County, Kentucky via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. To get notifications of upcoming gardening classes, contact the Oldham County Extension office.

    Hellebores
    Friday, March 24, 6:30 p.m.
    Biologist Anne Cartwright of the American Hosta Society discusses another of her favorite flowers: hellebores. This gardening class is sponsored by the Oldham County Master Gardener Association.

    Wildflower Walks With Tavia
    Saturday, March 25
    Woodland Garden Walk: 10:15 a.m.
    Forest Trails Wildflower Walk: 12:15 p.m.
    March is a marvelous time to rediscover our scenic landscape and its many inhabitants. Tavia will share share medicinal uses of plants, how they got their names, any fun strategies of how they reproduce, and “flora-lore” and stories that have been told by Native Americans.

    Vegetable Gardening
    Tuesday, April 11, 6:30 p.m.
    Horticulturist Michael Boice will share tips on establishing and maintaining a successful home vegetable garden.

    Gardening for Wildlife
    Thursday, May 4, 6:30 p.m.
    Master Gardener Mike Guelda discusses using native plants to draw in birds, bees, and butterflies. This gardening class is sponsored by the Oldham County Master Gardener Association.

    Year-Round Irises
    Thursday, May 11, 10:00 a.m.
    Bob Strohman, author of the recently published Iris Red, Iris Dead and member of the Louisville Iris Society, shows how to have irises in bloom all twelve months of the year. This gardening class is sponsored by the Oldham County Master Gardener Association.

    Photographs by Jennifer Anderson (USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database), Paul Henjum, Christian Hummert, SB Johnny, Ryan Kaldari, Nicholas A. Tonelli, Sudhir Viswarajan. Used under the Creative Commons License.

    Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Master Gardener. Reviewed by Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent.