Supporting Oldham County Agriculture

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

“If it wasn’t for 4-H I do not think I would have developed the skills that have helped me take care of my own horse, and I would not have gained the knowledge that is helping me [study pre-veterinary science.]”
– Oldham County 4-H alumni

Supporting Oldham’s #1 Ag Commodity

The 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey reported a total value of Oldham County’s equine and equine-related assets of $163 million. Oldham County ranks 4th in Kentucky in value of equine sold, 5th in equine operation income, 6th in value of equine and equine acres, and 7th in equine population.

Oldham County Extension supports farm managers and horse owners through site visits to help troubleshoot problems and improve pastures and horse health. This includes improving pastures through reseeding, fertility management, weed control, and grazing management; improving horse diets; and hay testing.

The Extension Service also provides equine programs on worming, pasture management, vaccinations, showmanship, and tack care. Between July 2016 and June 2017, the county 4-H and agriculture agents, as well as numerous community equine professionals and veterinarians, taught seven educational sessions to 4-H members and horse owners. Thirty-six repeat attendees learned valuable horse care information that improved health and safety of both horse and rider.

oc 4-h horse club

Oldham County 4-H’ers at the Kentucky State 4-H Horse Show.

Through monthly educational meetings, 4-H horse club members build social and emotional skills like accountability, empathy, leadership, and confidence.

Beef Field Day

In Oldham County, pasture makes up 32% of available farmland and provides grazing for livestock. Livestock are important to Oldham County’s economy, with cattle alone representing over 2.4 million dollars in sales in 2012, according to the Census of Agriculture.

Because of the importance and prevalence of cattle production in the area, agriculture extension agents in Oldham, Trimble, Henry, and Shelby Counties have organized and held annual Regional Beef Field Days for farmers since 2005. These field days offer farmers an opportunity to see how production practices work on other farms. Field days also promote implementation of new practices that improve production efficiency while protecting natural resources, which are goals outlined in the county plan of work.

In 2016, this event was held at an Oldham County Farm. During the field day, 250 Louisville area producers attended and learned about:

  • Heavy Use Feeding Areas and Other Conservation Practices that Protect Soil and Water
  • Proper Handling Facilities to Minimize Animal Stress
  • Good Herd Health Practices and Update on Antibiotics Use

Farms make up one-half of total land acreage in Oldham County.

“Looking at the handling facilities setup helped me decide on changes needed for my own system.”
– Oldham County farmer

Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

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2017 Winter OC Extension Events

The following calendar originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

All activities are held at the Oldham County Extension office unless otherwise noted. Please call to RSVP for classes held at extension offices.

December Extension Calendar

1 Louisville Area Homemakers Council, John Black Center, 10 am
1 4-H Teen Club
4 4-H Robotics Club
5 OC Homemakers Executive Board, 10 am
5 Cattlemen’s Association, 6 pm
7 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
8 Beef Quality Assurance Training/Certification, 9 am
8 OC Beekeepers, 6:30 pm
11 Green Thumbs Garden Club, 9:30 am
11 4-H Cloverbud Club
12 Green Thumbs 4-H Horticulture Club
14 Private Pesticide Applicator Training/Certification, 9 am
14 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
18 Delicious Delights 4-H Cooking Club
18 Santa’s Workshop

December 22 – January 1: Office Closed for Winter Break

January Extension Calendar

4 OC Homemaker Council, 10 am
4 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
8 Green Thumbs, 9:30 am
8 4-H Robotics Club
8-9 KY Fruit & Vegetable Growers Conference, Lexington
9 Ornamental Grasses, 10 am
11 Green Thumbs 4-H Horticulture Club
11-12 KY Cattlemen’s Convention, Lexington
12 OC Beekeepers, 7:30 pm
14-17 American Forage & Grassland Council Conference, Louisville
15 MLK Day, Office Closed
15 4-H Cloverbud Club
15 4-H Teen Club
16 Plant Propagation, 6 pm
17 Master Haymaker begins, Shelby Co. Extension
18 4-H Council
19 Shade Gardens, 10 am
20 Curing The Winter Blues With Succulents, Oldham Co. Conservation District, 10 am
22 Come Sew With Us: Serging, 10 am–2 pm
22 Come Sew With Us: Repair & Up-Cycle, 3–8 pm
25 Homemaker Lesson: Vegetarian 101, 10 am
25 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
26 Private Pesticide Applicator Training, 9 am
29 Delicious Delights 4-H Cooking Club

February Extension Calendar

1 OC Extension Council & District Board
1 Leaders of the Pack 4-H Dog Club
5 “Spit Polish,” 10 am
5 4-H Robotics Club
7-10 Kentucky Volunteer Forum
9 OC Beekeepers, 7:30 pm
12 Green Thumbs Garden Club, 9:30 am
12 4-H Cloverbud Club
15 Green Thumbs 4-H Club
16 Oldham County Cultural Arts
16 4-H Teen Club
19 Delicious Delights 4-H Club
20 Garden Myths, 6:30 pm
22 Alfalfa/Stored Forages Conference, Cave City
22 Homemaker Lesson: Ins & Outs of Downsizing, 10 am
22 Busy 4-H’ers of Oldham County
23 Louisville Area Cultural Arts
24 Fruit Production
26 Come Sew With Us: Kitchen Accessories, 10 am–2 pm
28 Flower Photography, 6:30 pm

Note: The printed version of the newsletter listed nutrition classes at Dare to Care food pantries. As of November, Dare to Care will no longer be conducting a mobile pantry at the LaGrange Community Center. Dare to Care will continue to contribute to pantries such as HighPoint in La Grange and Grace and Glory in Goshen.

Extension Teaches Food Safety & Nutrition Classes

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources and Family & Consumer Science articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Food Safety in Oldham County

Oldham and surrounding counties are home to many farmers markets, roadside farm markets, and community supported agriculture sites. Additionally, some farms sell to grocery stores and restaurants. A concern for producers and consumers is safe production, harvest, handling, and storage of food to minimize risk of microbial and other contaminant-related sicknesses.

farmers market produce

The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky Department of Agriculture developed Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) guidelines to reduce the likelihood of produce contamination. It focuses on safe techniques and inputs on all levels of the farm to fork food chain. Farmers that utilize GAP principles in their production proactively take steps to reduce the possibility of producing unsafe food products. County Extension Offices provide GAP training to producers throughout the state.

From 2008 to 2017:

  • Oldham County Extension has provided 15 GAP training sessions to 56 producers.
  • These producers sell products in at least 44 markets, community supported agriculture sites, grocery stores, and restaurants.
  • These producers sell in Oldham, Jefferson, Henry, Shelby, Trimble, and Barren counties.

At a conservative estimate of 500 consumers reached through each market, this represents a minimum of 22,000 consumers purchasing foods that have been safely produced by local farmers. GAP is an ongoing training program offered periodically throughout the year at Oldham County Extension, with training verified through the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

oc canning classes

Oldham County Extension also targets food safety during canning classes. Following Canning Boot Camp in June 2017, twenty-five Oldham Countians reported that they could identify research-based methods for home food preservation, safe methods of canning low and high acid foods, and signs of spoilage in home canned goods. Participants with intermediate to skilled canning experience indicated plans to increase the amount of food that they canned.

Stretching Your Food Dollars

Although Oldham County is one of Kentucky’s healthiest and wealthiest counties, over 5,100 residents live in poverty. Struggling Oldham County residents learn food budgeting tips at the Oldham County Extension office.

Over the past year, the FCS agent taught a series of seven Economical Entrée classes for Extension Homemakers and the general public. This “train the trainer” program reached more than 1,533 people in Oldham and surrounding counties. Post-lesson survey results showed that 99% of participants understood the entrée’s role according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 95% could identify economical proteins, and 94% felt confident planning meals using economical entrees. A six month follow-up survey revealed 89% of participants use new skills to prepare economical entrees at home and estimate saving $25.00 or more on monthly food expenses.

economical entrees

Extension programming emphasizes utilizing available resources to help provide nutritious food for a growing family. In 2013, Sheila N. attended a series of “Cooking on a Budget” classes that were held at the Oldham County Extension office. Her husband being an avid hunter, Sheila was looking for ways to make meals with the wild game that her family would find more appealing. Along with meal planning and money-saving strategies, the FCS agent provided easy and economical recipes that included venison and other wild game. Recently, Sheila reported that her family now boasts that they have the most delicious meals using wild game. Plus, Sheila has been able to be a stay at home mom and provide care for her children.

To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget. Of the 70 plus families that receive supplemental food each month, more than 40% report using recipes and tips to save an average of $20.00 a week.

Inmates Pursue Healthier Lifestyles

The National Institute on Drug Abuse asserts that successful addiction treatment helps an addict become drug-free, stay drug-free, and be productive member of the family. In an effort to address the latter, the Oldham County Extension EFNEP assistant partnered with Roederer Correctional Complex to bring nutrition education to their substance abuse program. Lessons from the Healthy Choices curriculum focus on helping prepare inmates for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Since the fall of 2016, approximately 60 participants have learned how to use nutrition labels to find healthy food choices for their families, proper food safety techniques, and stretch food dollars. Extension also provides low-salt, low-sugar versions of common recipes, such as Bean and Corn Salsa for healthier tailgating.

healthy food choices

Multiple participants noted the importance in keeping a daily food journal, especially in the case of previous health issues. One man expressed his hope that his diabetic wife could use this strategy to improve her eating habits.

Written by Chris Duncan, Oldham County Extension Family & Consumer Science Agent; Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Sherry Ragsdale, Expanded Food and Nutrition Program Assistant.

Backyard Chickens 101

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources article originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Coming in March: CHICKENS 101

Keeping chickens continues to be popular for residents here. Production in Oldham County ranges from small backyard flocks to farms that raise over 500 meat chickens on pasture each year. If you’re thinking of getting chickens, make sure and take time to learn about required housing and care for them.

Oldham and Shelby County Extension Offices are offering a program in early March to provide information on caring for chickens. Space is limited, so contact us to reserve your seat for these free classes.

Breed Selection, Chick Care, Housing, & Predator Control
March 1, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Presented by Walt Reichert, Shelby County Extension Horticulture Technician, at Shelby County Extension.

Health & Nutrition
March 8, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Presented by Dr. Jacquie Jacob, UK Extension Poultry Specialist, at the John Black Community Center.

backyard chickens

UK Extension also developed a great site to provide information on raising chickens: www.smallflocks.org, which includes printed information and videos. At the very least, I’ll leave you with two important pieces of advice. The first is everything loves chicken, so a secure coop is needed to put chickens up for the night to prevent predation. The second is pay extra to purchase sexed chicks so that you only get hens. If you’re raising chickens for eggs, you don’t need any roosters. My grandma had no problem killing the ‘extra’ roosters for the dinner table, but many people are reluctant to eat something that has become a backyard pet.

Written by Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent.

Oldham County 4-H Sweeps Awards

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Achievement Award Winners Recognized at 4-H Banquet

The 4-H Achievement Program recognizes members beginning in the sixth grade. The application is a detailed resume of the member’s 4-H and community involvement. Scholarships are available at each state level achieved. Congratulations to the following 4-H’ers who have completed a Clover Achievement Level:

Clover Level 1
Claire Combs
Ryan Hawkins
Bailey Johnson
Riely Johnson
Sean Johnson

Clover Level 2
Maggie Jones
Andrew Myers
Adelle Minor
Caroline Olds

Clover Level 3
Rebekah Anderson
Peyton Ash
Hunter Fackler
Ella Olds
Will Shannon

Clover Level 4
Maggie Anderson
Brooke Horton
Keirstin Kennedy
Ruby Mason
Shelby Shackelford
Ethan Willis

Clover Level 5
Noah Anderson
Ryann Horton
Meridan Myers
Max Renner

Submitted for State Level Awards
Hannah Anderson
Noah Anderson
Sarah Griffin
Beth Huffman
Molly Logsdon
Olivia Minor

oc 4-h shooting sports

Oldham County 4-H’ers Excel at State Shoot

At the Kentucky 4-H State Shooting Sports Competition, Oldham County 4-H’ers won a total of 44 trophies, 4 jackets, and 3 top scores. See the full list of State Shoot winners.

Winters News From Oldham County Homemakers

The following Family & Consumer Sciences articles originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

louisville area homemakers

Louisville Area Homemakers News

Congratulations to Dottie Crouch, the newly elected Louisville Area Homemakers President. Dottie was elected to a three year term at the Annual Area meeting on October 17 in Henry County. Seventeen Oldham County Homemakers celebrated the Area’s accomplishments over the past year with representatives from Bullitt, Henry, Jefferson, Shelby, Spencer, and Trimble Counties.

Three Oldham Countians accepted Area Chairman positions: Nancy Dahlgren as Parliamentarian, Becky Seidel for Leadership Development, and Paula State for Family & Individual Development. Peggy Townsend continues to serve as Chair of Cultural Arts & Heritage.

Celebrating Old-Fashioned Holiday Traditions

On November 2, Crossroads and Goshen Area Homemakers demonstrated ideas for a beautiful, economical Old-Fashioned Traditions at this year’s Holiday Showcase. Participants learned about gumdrop trees and the history of pompoms; made take-home crafts; and sampled recipes, including potato candy, Woodford pudding, and Scottish scones.

homemakers holiday showcase

Winter Homemaker Lessons

Join us at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, January 25, for Vegetarian 101. Chris Duncan, Oldham County Family & Consumer Sciences Agent, explores vegetarian and vegan diets, examining history, outlining health benefits, and reviewing possible nutrient challenges of a plant-based diet.

The average person moves 11 times over a lifetime (U.S. Census Bureau), and downsizing to a smaller home has become a recent trend. Learn the Ins and Outs of Downsizing at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 22. This lesson will be presented by Jane Proctor, Trimble County Extension FCS Agent.

Get Ready for Cultural Arts

Attend Spit Polish on Monday, February 5, to learn how to prepare a blue ribbon entry for Cultural Arts, county and state fairs, and other competitions. Class begins at 10:00 a.m. and ends at 2:00 p.m. with lunch provided. Free and open to the public. Reservations required by January 29.

On Friday, February 16, Oldham County Extension Homemakers will hold their annual Cultural Arts & Heritage Day at the John Black Community Center, located at 1551 North Highway 393 in Buckner. Entry tags and registration materials will be available at the Extension Office in January. See pages 27-29 of the Oldham County Homemaker Handbook for guidelines and categories.

homemakers cultural arts

Blue ribbon winners from the county competition will advance to the Louisville Area Homemakers Cultural Arts event on Friday, February 23, also at the John Black Center. Viewing of judged entries will be between noon and 1:00 p.m.

Written by Chris Duncan, Oldham County Extension Family & Consumer Sciences Agent; and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Loneliness Affects Your Health

The Following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 26, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

loneliness affects your health

Socialization Affects Your Health

Just as we need food and water to survive, we also need meaningful social relationships and connections. We are wired for social contact, so going without it increases the risks to jeopardize our overall health, well-being, and quality of life. While it is okay to feel lonely and to be alone on occasion, chronic loneliness can cause serious health concerns. Researchers continue to demonstrate how important meaningful relationships with others are to our mental, emotional, and physical health.

If not addressed, loneliness can lead to social isolation, physical and mental decline, and depression. Recent studies have shown that social isolation can also lead to a number of negative health impacts including poor sleeping patterns, a disrupted immune system, poor nutrition, destruction of arteries, and high blood pressure. When the need for socialization is not met, it can also negatively affect learning, memory, and motivation.

Loneliness can occur at any age and can be a normal feeling — especially after a break-up, a move to a new location, loss of a loved one, or exclusion from a group. On the other hand, chronic loneliness (feeling lonely, isolated, or lacking in close connections for an extended period of time) can bring about discomfort and distress, including feeling sad, empty, isolated, distanced from others, deprived, and filled with longing. These feelings lead to many problems. Children and teens, for example, are more likely to adopt an outcast status, have problems in or drop out of school, or even become delinquent. Lonely adults are at greater risk of alcoholism and depression. Those living alone are at greater risk of suicide.

Loneliness is particularly prevalent among older adults. As we age, our social circle shrinks, which makes it more difficult to have meaningful interactions with others. According to a 2013 AARP study, the percentage of adults who say they are lonely has doubled from 20 percent in the 1980s to 40 percent today. About 30 percent of adults older than 65 live alone. That number jumps to 50 percent in adults over 85.

loneliness negatively affects health

If you are experiencing loneliness, you are not alone, and you don’t have to be as there are many ways to increase your social interactions. Consider the following tips:

  • Find a cause to be passionate about and donate your time. There are many community organizations in Oldham County in need of volunteers: Humane Society of Oldham County, Oldham County Red Cross, Crossroads Pregnancy Center, Dare to Care Food Bank, and many more. Not only will you get to interact with others, but you will also get satisfaction from giving back.
  • Don’t miss opportunities to interact with your family. Attend family events like reunions and weddings. If you have grandkids who live close, consider attending one of their extracurricular activities, such as a ballgame or a dance recital. The socialization will positively impact your health and also encourage the child to practice and try harder.
  • Take up a hobby. Find something you are passionate about or learn more about something you already enjoy. Consider joining a group that shares your interests, such as a writing group at the Oldham County Public Library or the knitters at Friends and Fiber in La Grange.

The Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service offers many opportunities for social interaction including Extension Homemaker clubs, Master Gardener programs, Master Clothing Volunteers, Master Cattleman, 4-H volunteer opportunities, and all kinds of classes on various subjects. Find out more about local extension events by contacting us via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can visit oldham.ca.uky.edu or facebook.com/OldhamCo to learn more about upcoming events.

loneliness affects your health

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Hosier, Associate Extension Professor for Family Life Education, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Celebrate KY Homemakers Week

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 12, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

2017 KEHA Week

oldham county homemakers

Celebrate Extension Homemakers during KEHA Week

Kentucky Extension Homemakers Association Week is October 8 through 14, and the state’s more than 850 clubs are celebrating their accomplishments from the past year.

Extension Homemakers are firmly rooted in community service with more than 14,000 members contributing more than 300,000 volunteer hours for Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service-sponsored activities.

olsham county homemakers

KEHA members are huge supporters of higher education and youth. During the 2015-2016 fiscal year, the organization awarded more than $58,000 in college scholarships to deserving students and gave more than $14,000 in 4-H Camp scholarships. Extension Homemakers also volunteered more than 90,000 hours to support youth development activities across the state.

The organization supports several international causes including the Kentucky Academy in Ghana. During the past nine years, Extension Homemakers have helped the academy, which is a kindergarten based in Adjeikrom, Ghana, with various projects. These efforts include building upgrades, new furniture, and a new water well. Most recently, the group has raised money to fund the construction of a library in the village of Adjeikrom.

oldham county homemakers

Outreach efforts extend to local communities too. In the 2015-2016 fiscal year, Oldham County Extension Homemakers volunteered 20,866 hours to our community. Charitable projects included making lap blankets for the VA Hospital, sewing hats for cancer patients and premature babies, donating time and money to local food banks, and making and delivering holiday cards to nursing home residents. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also raise money for ovarian cancer research, Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

Joining Extension Homemakers is a great way to get involved with and give back to your community. If you are interested in learning more, contact the Oldham County Extension office via (502) 222-9453.

oldham county homemakers

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Kim Henken, Director of Communications and Strategic Partnerships for the School of Human Environmental Sciences, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Fall 2017 4-H Events

The following 4-H Youth Development calendar printed in the Fall 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

oldham county 4-h calendar

All activities are held at Oldham County Extension unless otherwise noted.

September 4-H Calendar

4 Office closed for Labor Day
5 4-H Club Leader Meeting, 6:30 p.m.
11 Teen Club, 6:00 p.m.
14 Busy 4-H’ers, 6:30 p.m.
16 Challenge Walk, Wendell Moore Park, 9:30 a.m.
16 District 3 Teen Council, Carroll County Extension, 10:00 a.m.
18 Delicious Delights, 6:30 p.m.
19 Extension Foundation, 9:00 a.m.

oldham county 4-h calendar

October 4-H Calendar

5 Leaders of the Pack, 6:30 p.m.
7 Oldham County Dog Show
12 Extension Council, 9:00 a.m.
12 District Board, 10:00 a.m.
12 4-H Council, 7:00 p.m.
13 4-H Reality Store, North Oldham High School
14 Teen Club, haunted house outing
16 Delicious Delights, 6:30 p.m.
30 Busy 4-H’ers, 6:30 p.m.

oldham county 4-h calendar

November 4-H Calendar

9 Leaders of the Pack, 6:30 p.m.
14 Busy 4-H’ers, 6:30 p.m.
20 Delicious Delights, 6:30 p.m.
20 Teen Club, volunteering opportunity
21 4-H Awards Banquet, John Black Center
23-24 Office closed for Thanksgiving

Fall 2017 FCS Events

The following Family & Consumer Science calendar printed in the Fall 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

oldham county fcs calendar

All activities are held at Oldham County Extension unless otherwise noted.

September FCS Calendar

4 Office closed for Labor Day
16 Challenge Walk, Wendell Moore Park, 9:30 a.m.
20 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, LaGrange Community Center, 1:15 p.m.
25 Come Sew with Us, “Pillow Cases and More,” 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.
26 Senior Health Fair, Oldham County Health Department, 9:00 a.m. – noon
28 Homemaker Lesson, “Dealing Creatively with Conflict,” 10:00 a.m.
30 Autumn Colors Craft Show, LaGrange Community Center, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

oldham county fcs calendar

October FCS Calendar

2 Paid reservations for Louisville Area Annual Meeting due
8-14 Celebrate Homemaker Week
10 Perfecting Your Pies, 1:00 p.m.
12 Extension Council, 9:00 a.m.; District Board 10:00 a.m.
17 Homemaker Annual Meeting, Henry County Extension Office, 9:30 a.m.
18 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, LaGrange Community Center, 1:15 p.m.
23 Come Sew with Us, “Just Stuff It,” 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.
26 Homemaker Lesson, “Toaster Ovens,” 10:00 a.m.

oldham county fcs calendar

November FCS Calendar

2 Homemaker Holiday Showcase: An Old Fashioned Holiday, 10:00 a.m. – noon
13 Come Sew with Us, “Holiday Ideas,” 3:00 p.m.
15 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, LaGrange Community Center, 1:15 p.m.
17 Louisville Area Diabetes Awareness Day, Shelby County Extension Office, 10:00 a.m.
23-24 Office closed for Thanksgiving
30 Homemaker dues and enrollment due to extension office