Youth Heart Disease Information

youth heart disease info

Heart Disease

Youth Health Bulletin

Have you ever heard that someone you know has heart disease? It is a very common illness, and in fact, more than 60 million Americans have it. Wally Cat wants to make sure you know what heart disease is and how you can take care of your heart.

What is Heart Disease?

Heart disease is also known as cardiovascular disease. As you may have guessed, a person who has heart disease has problems with their heart and blood vessels — they are not working the way they should.

There are many problems that people with heart disease have, such as high blood pressure and chest pains. People with heart disease are also more likely to have heart attacks and strokes. A heart attack is when there is a blockage of blood flow to the heart. This means that the heart is not getting the blood that is needed for it to work properly. A stroke is when a place in the brain is not getting enough blood.

Other Problems for People With Heart Disease

  • The arteries get hard, making it more difficult to move blood through the body.
  • An area of fat and cholesterol builds up, making the passageway for blood narrower. This makes it harder for blood to get to the body.

Can You Catch Heart Disease?

Heart disease is not an illness that is spreads by germs like a cold! There are risk factors that can increase a person’s chances of getting heart disease. Some of the risk factors cannot be controlled, such as getting older and having other people in the family with the disease. There are some risk factors that can be controlled, such as smoking, having high blood pressure, being overweight, or not exercising enough.

How Do You Prevent Heart Disease?

There are ways you can start to prevent heart disease even at your age. You can watch out for some of the risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and physical inactivity. As a child, you can watch what you eat and how much you are active.

youth heart disease information

Try to eat lots of fruits and vegetables — and if they are fresh, even better! Also, you should try to be as active as you can. Throughout the day, you should be active for at least an hour. You also want to be aware of how much time you are sitting in front of a screen, whether it is the TV, computer, tablet, or phone. This type of activity has little to no physical activity.

Fun ways to be physically active include:

  • Riding your bike. You might be able to go for a bike ride in your neighborhood or at a nearby park.
  • Swimming. Join a swim team through your school or community. The Oldham County YMCA has an indoor pool so you can stay active even during winter.
  • Walking your dog. Physical activity is good for you and Fido too!

Wally Cat wants you to know about heart disease because it affects so many people. He also wants you to start good habits to protect your heart, such as eating healthy and staying active.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control. Wally Cat illustrations by Chris Ware (© University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences).

Get Your Kids to Eat Their Veggies

get kids to eat veggies

Getting Children to Eat Their Veggies

Do you hear “I don’t like vegetables!” during family dinner? According to research from the American Academy for Science and the Centers for Disease Control, children turn up their noses at vegetables because parents have not made them readily available. Let’s face it, few children will take the time to wash a head of broccoli or cauliflower, break the pieces apart, serve them up on a plate, and then eat them.

Parents can increase the chances that their children will eat a particular vegetable if it is in a small container or individual plastic bag in the refrigerator. This makes vegetables an easy snack option for children to choose themselves.

get kids eating veggies

Children form food habits at an early age. Research shows a correlation between picky children and picky adults. It is important for parents to introduce good eating habits in children when they are young. It is, however, never too late to start.

Tips to Get Children to Eat Vegetables

Be a role model. Offer vegetables to children by eating them yourself. Let children approach them on their own.

Set some rules. Children usually will accept vegetables in an environment where parents set appropriate rules. For example, it is okay to tell your child they need to taste a vegetable before they decide they do not like it.

Stay positive. Using strategies such as punishment, threats, force, or even offering the child a reward have been shown to be unsuccessful ways of teaching children to eat vegetables. Vegetables should be offered in a relaxed environment.

Don’t give up. Keep offering the vegetables. It might be helpful to offer the vegetable to the child in different ways or mixing the vegetable with other foods. Many parents throw in the towel after the child refuses a vegetable the first time, but understand that children generally have a fear of new foods. It may take about eight to ten tries with a vegetable before your child is ready to taste it. In addition, it may take a lot more tasting before your child gets to the point where he or she likes the vegetable. Be patient as your child experiences new foods.

Be creative. Offer children vegetables in different forms (cooked, raw, and mixed with other foods) before you decide they do not like them.

Be flexible. Children vary in how much they eat and what they like. Each child is an individual. Do not have predetermined ways in which your child should eat or accept vegetables.

Be reasonable. Keep in mind that vegetable servings for children are smaller than vegetable servings for adults. A general guideline is one tablespoon of vegetable for each year of life. Do not have unrealistic expectations for your child.

Give options. Offer a variety of vegetables at a particular meal. This allows children to be able to choose a vegetable they like.

get your children to get their vegetables

Take Action: Make it Happen

Vegetables offers protection from many diseases, and thanks to the vitamins and minerals they provide, improves your child’s health. It is important for children to eat the recommended amount of vegetables daily.

Parents, try these tricks to make vegetables more enticing to your children:

  • Offer vegetables daily. Children will not eat vegetables if parents do not cook and serve them.
  • Let children pick out a vegetable of the week at the grocery store.
  • Make vegetables easy for children to grab and eat. Have ready to eat vegetable snacks in small bags in the refrigerator.
  • Set out a plate of vegetables with dip before dinner or when children get home from school.
  • Prepare vegetables in a way in which they are tender but crisp. Children tend to dislike mushy vegetables and many prefer raw vegetables for this reason.
  • Include two vegetables at dinner; try offering both cooked and raw vegetables. This allows children to have a choice of vegetable they want to eat.
  • Add lettuce leaves to sandwiches.
  • Add blended vegetables such as spinach to spaghetti sauce, soups, and casserole. It is a good idea to blend or cut up the vegetable finely before adding it to spaghetti sauce. Children may not even notice the vegetable is there.
  • Make food fun. Let children create funny faces or animals with cut up vegetables.
  • Let children help prepare vegetable recipes; they generally enjoy what they have made.
  • Allow kids to make their own salad. Put out small bowls of baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, shredded leaf lettuce, raisins, fruit, and crunch noodles. They love the feeling of control that comes from doing it themselves.
  • Try heirloom vegetables. Kids get excited about interesting vegetables. Take your children to a farmer’s market and have them pick out the heirlooms they would like to try.

getting kids to eat veggies

Written by Ingrid Adams, Nutrition and Food Science Extension Specialist; Mallory Foster, Family and Consumer Sciences graduate student; and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Recall Alert: EpiPens, Aldi’s Peas, Hunt’s Chili Kits

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) releases food and drug recall notices to help consumers stay informed. Sign up to receive email notifications of Recalls, Market Withdrawals, and Safety Alerts.

EpiPens Recalled

Mylan is recalling EpiPens (epinephrine injections) and EpiPen Jrs due to potential defects. A defective EpiPen may require unnecessary force in order to deploy medicine, or in some cases, the device may altogether fail. Epinephrine, the drug injected by an EpiPen, is first aid treatment for an individual undergoing anaphylactic shock, or life-threatening allergic reaction.

The recall was originally limited to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and Japan but has since expanded to include the United States. Outside of the United Stated, there have been two cases reported of individuals whose EpiPens failed during emergency situations. Both patients, fortunately, were able to use alternate EpiPens in order to obtain treatment.

Both faulty EpiPens came from the same lot, but additional lots are now being recalled out of precaution. The potentially defective EpiPens were distributed between December 2015 and July 2016. Recalled lots in the United States are listed below.

faulty epipens recalled

The image below indicated where to find the lot number on an EpiPen package.

recalling epipens

Patients carrying recalled EpiPens are encouraged to return them for replacements, free of charge. The manufacturing company can also be contacted via 800-796-9526 or customer.service@mylan.com.

Aldi’s Peas Recalled

Just under two thousand packages of Season’s Choice Frozen Peas are being voluntarily recalled due to potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Listeria infections can be serious or even fatal in young children, the elderly, or other persons with weakened immune systems. Symptoms include high fever, nausea, stiffness, severe headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Pregnant women who are infected with Listeria may suffer miscarriages or stillbirths.

The recalled frozen peas were distributed to Aldi Stores in Florida, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and West Virginia. Identify the recalled product by its label code:

Season’s Choice Sweet Peas, Net Weight 16 oz (1 LB) 454 g UPC code 041498164294

Code: DC17038 PLAB6176 BEST BY 08 2018

DC27038 PLAB6176 BEST BY 08 2018

DC27038 BNAF7286 BEST BY 08 2018

DC37038 BNAF7286 BEST BY 08 2018

DC47038 PLAC6216 BEST BY 08 2018

DC57038 PLAC6216 BEST BY 08 2018

Consumers may returned recalled products to place of purchase for full refunds.

Hunt’s Chili Kit Recalled

On April 2, Conagra initiated a voluntary recall of its Hunt’s Chili Kits due to potential Salmonella contamination of the chili seasoning packets. Symptoms of a Salmonella infection include abdominal cramps, fever, and diarrhea. An otherwise healthy individual may recover without treatment, although some cases of severe diarrhea lead to hospitalization. Salmonella infections pose the greatest risk to infants, the elderly, and others with weakened immune systems.

The recalled chili kits were distributed in retail stores and online, as well as through military commissaries, across the United States. Identify a recalled product via UPC and Manufacturing Lot Codes.

Item Description UPC MFG/Lot Code Best By Date
HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534619500 Apr 04, 2018
HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534622200 May 01, 2018
HUNT’S CHILI KIT 44.8OZ 20-0-27000-42063-2 3534619600 April 5, 2018

The below picture demonstrates where to find the information that can be used to identify a recalled chili product.

hunts recall

Organ Donation Facts and Fiction

Organ Donation: Did You Know?

There are many myths about organ donation. These myths may result in someone not wanting to be a donor. Learn a little more about common myths and whether there is any truth to them.

organ donor

Myth 1: If I have a chronic medical condition, I cannot be a donor.

Fact: Regardless of your medical history, you can sign up to be a donor. There are actually a few conditions in which a donation would not be possible. These include HIV infection, active cancer, or infection that affected the whole body. If a person is listed as a donor, the transplant team will determine if a donation of possible at the time of the donor’s death.

organ donation

Myth 2: If I am at a hospital and the healthcare team sees that I am a donor, they will not try to save my life.

Fact: When a person is admitted to the hospital, the healthcare team’s priority is to take care of the person and save their life if needed. Donation of organs is not part of the conversation until all other lifesaving methods have been used.

Myth 3: People who have a lot of money or are famous get to the top of the waiting list faster than anyone else.

Fact: There is a national computer system that works to match up donors and recipients. The match comes from comparing the donor and medical information of the receiver of the organs. Blood type, type spent waiting, and geographical location all come under consideration as well. How much money a person has, their race, or celebrity status are never used to determine recipients.

organ donor

Myth 4: There are people out there who could take my organs and sell them.

Fact: In the United States, there are federal laws that ban the buying and selling of human organs. A person or company that breaks these laws can be fined or given prison sentences.

Myth 5: If I donate organs, my family cannot have an open casket at the funeral.

Fact: When organs are donated, a body is treated with care throughout the process. In most cases, an open casket funeral is possible for those who donate organs, tissues, and even eyes.

organ donor health bulletin

Donating organs can be a big decision but could save many lives. Don’t let myths about donation stop you from being an organ donor.

Source material from U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation. Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Originally published by Kentucky Extension in the April 2017 Adult Health Bulletin.

March Food Recalls

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) releases food and drug recall notices to help consumers stay informed. Sign up to receive email notifications of Recalls, Market Withdrawals, and Safety Alerts.

Edamame (Soybean) Recall

On March 16, Advanced Fresh Concepts (AFC) issued a recall for packaged Edamame (soybeans) due to the potential of Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Listeria infections can be serious, even fatal, in young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and other persons with weakened immune systems. Symptoms include fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. A Listeria infection can also cause a pregnant woman to suffer a miscarriage, stillbirth, or fetal infection.

The recalled products were sold in eight ounce (227 gram) packages, labeled “Edamame – Soybeans in Pods” with UPC 0-23012-00261-9. Packaging also bears a date between January 1 and March 17 of this year. The recalled soybeans were distributed through sushi counters in grocery stores, cafeterias, and corporate dining centers in Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Washington DC, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washing, and Wyoming.

Recalled soybean packages are white with black and blue text:

soybean recall

Consumers who have purchased the recalled soybeans are encouraged to return packages to place of purchase for full refunds.

Wellness Dog Food Recalled

WellPet is voluntarily recalling a specific recipe of canned dog food topper due to elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone. Although beef thyroid hormone is naturally occurring, elevated levels may adversely affect your dog’s metabolism. Initial symptoms include anxiousness, increased heart rate, increased thirst, increased urination, and weight loss. Prolonged effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and rapid/difficulty breathing. If your dog has experienced any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian.

Wellness 95% Beef Topper For Dogs is the only recipe affected by this dog food recall. The product is sold in 13.2 ounce cans bearing Best By Dates of February 2, August 29, and August 30 of 2019. Recalled dog food cans were distributed online and at pet retailers throughout North America.

dog food recall

As of March 17, the FDA had received reports that three dogs were affected by the increased levels of beef thyroid hormone in Wellness 95% Beef Topper For Dogs. WellPet’s investigation led to this voluntary recall. The dogs in question have since full recovered.

“Please know that safeguarding the health and wellbeing of pets is of the utmost importance to us. We fully intend on maintaining the trust you have placed in us to keep your pets healthy and happy, and are removing this product as part of our ongoing commitment to quality and food safety.”

-Camelle Kent, WellPet CEO

Blue Buffalo Dog Food Recalled

Blue Buffalo Company has issued a voluntary recall for one production lot of BLUE Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dog. The recalled dog food may contain increased levels of a naturally occurring beef thyroid hormone. Prolonged consumption of the affected product may result in serious symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and rapid or difficulty breathing.

BLUE Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs is sold in 12.5 ounce cans. The recalled lot can be identified by UPC Code 840243101153 and Best By Date of June 7, 2019.

dog food recalled

Only one dog has been reported ill in connection with the Blue Buffalo canned dog food recall. Blue Buffalo’s investigation led to the voluntary recall. The dog which ate the affected product has made a complete recovery.

The recalled canned dog food was distributed online and at pet retailers across the nation. Consumers should cease feeding the affected Blue Buffalo dog food and return it to place of purchase for full refunds.

Nutiva Shakes Recalled

On March 18, Organic Superfoods company Nutiva issued a voluntary recall for specific vanilla shakes. The Vanilla Flavor Organic Plant Based Protein Superfood 30 Shakes are being recalled due to a potential peanut contamination. People with peanut allergies run the risk of an allergic reaction by consuming the recalled shake products.

The recalled shakes were packaged in ten 1.2 ounce (34 gram) packets or 21.6 ounce jars. The expiration date is September 20, 26, or 27 of 2018. The recalled Nutivaa shakes were distributed online and through retailers in California, Colorado, Florida, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Texas.

For product replacement or refund, contact Nutiva at (800) 993-4367 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., or email help@nutiva.com.

Cook Flavorful Food With Fewer Calories

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the March 2, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

healthy cooking recipes

More Flavor, Fewer Calories

Looking for ways to make fewer calories deliver more nutrition? Search for recipes that help you trim energy intake. Make sure to read all available nutritional information. You can even find phone apps that help you count calories and track other nutritional information such as vitamins, fiber, and sugar.

Sometimes, you may need to use a little of “the real thing” to get the flavor you crave. Start by reducing fats and sugars rather than cutting them out completely. Here are some tips for cooking to add flavor without too much fat or added sugar:

  • For some foods, like cheese or salad dressings, try reduced-fat instead of fat-free products. You may want to try using a ratio of two-thirds reduced-fat product to one-third real thing.
  • Try using one-third less sugar in your recipes or using a sugar substitute like stevia.
  • Make your sweet treats count. Cook with fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy ingredients in muffins and in desserts like banana pudding or sweet potato pie.
  • Add whole-wheat, soy, flax, or oatmeal to pancakes for more flavor and fiber.
  • Try roasting or smoking vegetables to give them more flavor without added calories.
  • Herbs and spices give foods distinctive flavors. When food is flavorful we may be satisfied with a smaller amount. Experiment with herbs like marjoram, thyme, or rosemary to see what tastes good to you. Buy herbs and spices on sale to stock your shelf with many possible ways to flavor your foods.
  • Garlic, onions, and celery add a lot of flavor with few calories.
  • When cooking a rice or pasta side dish, add frozen spinach or canned mushrooms to cut calories and add flavor.

healthy low calorie snack

Try new recipes and experiment with flavor profiles! Check out this low calorie, low sodium Apple Coleslaw recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 apples (1 red, 1 green), cored and chopped
  • 1/2 head of green cabbage, shredded (3 cups)
  • 1 cup shredded carrots
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 3/4 cup low fat vanilla yogurt
  • Optional: raisins or grapes

Directions:

  1. Mix yogurt and honey in a large bowl.
  2. Add other ingredients, mix together lightly.

Makes 12 servings.
Serving size: 1/2 cup
Cost per recipe: $3.38
Cost per serving: $0.28
Nutrition facts per serving: 45 calories, 0 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 25 mg sodium, 10 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 7 g sugar, 1 g protein

healthy apple coleslaw recipe

Find more healthy recipes like this on the Oldham County Extension website.

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Janet Mullins, Extension Specialist for Food and Nutrition, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Recipe from Debra Cotterill, Director of Kentucky Extension Nutrition Education Program.

Whooping Cough Fact Sheet

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

You may have heard about the cases of whooping cough in Lexington. Although most persons you may meet are vaccinated against the illness, it is important to be aware of whooping cough, its symptoms, and treatment.

Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a respiratory illness. It is very contagious. Pertussis vaccines are the most effective tool to prevent this illness, but like all vaccines, it is not 100% effective. This means that if whooping cough has been going through the community, there is still a chance that a fully vaccinated person can catch the illness. If a person has been vaccinated, however, the infection is usually not as bad for him or her.

Whooping cough spreads from person to person through coughing, sneezing, or even being in close proximity to someone with the illness. Many people are infected with whooping cough by siblings, parents, or caregivers who do not even know they have the illness. Symptoms of the illness usually begin within five to ten days after being exposed but could take up to three weeks to manifest.

Whooping Cough Symptoms

There are two stages of symptoms for whooping cough: early stage and late stage.

Early stage symptoms

(First 1 to 2 weeks)

  • Runny nose
  • Low-grade fever (generally minimal throughout the course of the disease)
  • Mild, occasional cough
  • Apnea (pause in breathing) in babies

Late stage symptoms

(The traditional symptoms people associate with whooping cough)

  • Fits of many, rapid coughs followed by a high-pitched “whoop” on the inhale
  • Vomiting (throwing up) during or after coughing fits
  • Exhaustion after coughing fits

Pertussis Symptoms for Babies

Symptoms for babies are very different from older children and adults. Babies might not even have a cough or it could be a slight cough. They are also likely to show apnea (a long pause in breathing). This illness is very dangerous for babies. Information about babies who have the illness shows that about 50% of babies under one year need care in the hospital.

What to Do if Seeing Symptoms

If a school age child is showing symptoms, he or she should stay home from school and visit a healthcare provider. You should take your child to a healthcare provider even if he or she has been vaccinated. If your child has whooping cough, he or she will need to stay out of school until all antibiotics have been taken.

If a person in your home has whooping cough, the healthcare provider may recommend that others in the home also take an antibiotic to prevent the spread of the illness.

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a contagious respiratory illness. Be on the watch for symptoms for you and your family and visit a healthcare provider should you think someone may have the illness.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Centers for Disease Control.

Amazing Pancakes Recipe

The following Family & Consumer Science article first printed in the Spring 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

amazing pancakes recipe

Amazing Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup self-rising flour
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup sweet potatoes, cooked and mashed
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup fat-free milk
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • 1/4 cup chopped nuts (optional)

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, combine flours, sugar, cinnamon, and nuts.
  2. In a separate medium bowl, mix sweet potatoes, eggs, milk, oil, and vanilla.
  3. Pour liquid mixture into flour mixture; stir until dry ingredients become wet. Be careful not to over stir.
  4. Preheat a griddle or skillet over medium-high heat. Spray with cooking spray. Drop heaping tablespoon of batter onto prepared griddle. Cook until golden brown, turning once with a spatula when the surface begins to bubble. Continue cooking until the other side is golden brown. Repeat process, making 12 pancakes.

About Amazing Pancakes

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Makes 6 servings
Serving size: 2 pancakes
Cost per recipe: $3.45
Cost per serving: $0.58

Nutrition facts (optional nuts not included) per serving: 260 calories, 8 g total fat, 1.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat, 95 mg cholesterol, 320 mg sodium, 39 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 10 g sugar, 9 g protein, 170% Daily Value (DV) vitamin A, 10% DV calcium, 10% DV iron

Source: Brooke Jenkins-Howard, Curriculum Coordinator for Kentucky Nutrition Education Program, University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service

Find other healthy recipes on the Oldham County Extension website.

February Food Recalls

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) releases food and drug recall notices to help consumers stay informed. Sign up to receive email notifications of Recalls, Market Withdrawals, and Safety Alerts.

Private Selection Pies Recalled

On February 8, Lengendary Baking issued a recall for Private Selection Salted Caramel Chocolate Almond Pie packages due to a mistake in labeling. Almonds and eggs were listed under “may contain” instead of “contains.” Consumption of the recalled pie products poses a health risk to people with almond and egg allergies.

The recalled pies come in 34 ounce packages marked with lot number CH17025. They were distributed to Kroger and other retail stores in Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

Consumers who have egg or almond allergies should not consume the recalled pies. Private Selection Salted Caramel Chocolate Almond Pies can be returned to place of purchase for full refunds.

Pimento Cheese Recalled

A recent recall of Ruth’s Salads Pimento Cheese Spreads has been expanded. Select cheese products are being recalled due to the possibility ofListeria contamination. Listeria can cause serious (or even fatal) infections in children, the elderly, and other people with weakened immune systems. Symptoms include fever, headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Listeria infections are also known to cause pregnant women to suffer miscarriages and stillbirths.

The recalled pimento cheese products were distributed to grocery stores in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. Affected products can be identified by UPC (see table below).

Product UPC Size
Ruth’s Original Pimento Spread 74952-00005 7 oz
Ruth’s Original Pimento Spread 74952-12023 12 oz
Ruth’s Original Pimento Spread 74952-24023 24 oz
Ruth’s Old Fashion Original Pimento Spread 74952-15005 16 oz
Ruth’s Jalapeno Pimento Spread 74952-12014 12 oz
Ruth’s Lite Pimento Spread 74952-12000 12 oz
Ruth’s Cream Cheese w/Pineapple-Pecans 74952-12008 12 oz

Meijer Recalling Cheese

Meijer Brand Colby Cheese and Colby Jack Cheese is being recalled due to a potential Listeria contamination. The affected products were sold in deli counters from November 10, 2016 to February 9, 2017. The plastic deli packaging is labeled with UPCs 215927xxxxxx or 215938xxxxxx (last six digits vary due to product weight).

Consumers possessing the recalled Meijer Colby Cheese and/or Meijer Colby Jack Cheese should discontinue consumption and are urged to return the recalled products to Meijer for full refunds.

PetSmart Dog Food Recalled

One lot of PetSmart canned dog food has been recalled. The product has potentially been contaminated with scrap metal which could present as a choking hazard to pets. No complaints have been received by PetSmart concerning this recall.

The recalled Grreat Choice Adult Dog Food was sold between October 10, 2016 and February 7, 2017 via PetSmart.com, Pet360.com, PetFoodDirect.com and in PetSmart retail stores across the United States. Only 13.2 ounce cans of Grreat Choice Adult Dog Food with Chicken & Rice Classic Ground were affected by this recall. To identify this product, look for UPC 7-3725726116-7, Best By Date 8/5/19, or Lot 1759338.

Customers who purchased the recalled dog food should feeding it to their pets. PetSmart Grreat Choice canned dog food can be returned or exchanged. Questions concerning this recall should be directed to PetSmart Customer Service: 1-888-839-9638.

January Food Recalls

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) releases food and drug recall notices to help consumers stay informed. Sign up to receive email notifications of Recalls, Market Withdrawals, and Safety Alerts.

Canned Cat Food Recalled

The recent recall of 9Lives, EverPet, and Special Kitty, and cat food has been expanded. The J.M. Smucker Company is recalling specific lots of these canned cat food products due to low levels of thiamine (Vitamin B1), an essential vitamin for cats. Thiamine deficiency symptoms include low appetite, increased salivation, vomited, and weight loss. Extended thiamine deficiency can lead to neurological issues such as wobbly walking and seizures. Typically reversible, contact your veterinarian immediately should your cat display any of the mentioned symptoms.

The recalled cat food products were distributed across the nation between December 20 and January 3. Check product codes to determine whether you bought recalled cans of 9Lives, EverPet, or Special Kitty canned cat food. Recalled canned cat food should not be fed to cats.

Limited Edition Holiday Twinkies Recalled

Hostess issued a recall of select packages of Holiday White Peppermint Twinkies. The confectionery coating, provided by Blommer Chocolate Company, was recalled due to a possible Salmonella contamination. No illnesses have been reported to date.

A Salmonella bacteria infection can cause serious illness and even death. Young children, elderly persons, and other people with weak immune systems are at the most risk. Someone infected with Salmonella may experience symptoms such as fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

Hostess is only recalling White Peppermint Twinkies with UPC 888109111571. They were only sold in multipack boxes (nine cakes individually wrapped, sold together in a box). The recalled Hostess Twinkies were sold throughout the United States to convenience stores, dollar and discount stores, and grocery stores. Consumers should not consume the affected products and are encouraged to return them to place of purchase for full refunds.

Recalled Palmer Candy

Select Palmer Candy products are being recalled due to a possible Salmonella contamination of a milk powder ingredient. The recalled candies, produced between October 20 and December 9, were distributed across the nation. Recalled products include Palmer Candy Chocolate Almond Bark, Palmer Candy Christmas Tree Pretzels, and Trail’s End Chocolatey Caramel Crunch.

“We are truly sorry for any distress this recall causes to our retail customers and to consumers. We remain committed to the highest standards in food quality and safety. We are taking this recall very seriously and truly appreciate the cooperation of our customers as we work to resolve this matter promptly.”

-Marty Palmer, Palmer Candy Company President and Chief Executive Officer

The recalled candies should not be consumed but can be returned for full refunds.

Recall of Pictsweet Okra

On January 13, the Pictsweet Company announced a recall of their 12 ounce Pictsweet Farms Breaded Okra due to a possible contamination of glass fragments. One minor injury has been reported in connection with the recalled okra products.

Recalled okra packages display UPC# 0 70560 98377 8 and a “best if used by” date of Nov 3, 2018. Affected production codes are 3086B C, 3086B D, 3086B E, 3086B F, or 3086B G. Check the back panel of the package to find this information. The Breaded Okra products were distributed to retail stores across the U.S.

The Pictsweet Company affirms that no other Pictsweet Farms products were affected by this recall.

Consumers possessing the recalled okra should not consume the product and are encouraged either to discard it or return to place of purchase for a full refund.