Extension Teaches Food Safety & Nutrition Classes

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources and Family & Consumer Science articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Food Safety in Oldham County

Oldham and surrounding counties are home to many farmers markets, roadside farm markets, and community supported agriculture sites. Additionally, some farms sell to grocery stores and restaurants. A concern for producers and consumers is safe production, harvest, handling, and storage of food to minimize risk of microbial and other contaminant-related sicknesses.

farmers market produce

The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky Department of Agriculture developed Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) guidelines to reduce the likelihood of produce contamination. It focuses on safe techniques and inputs on all levels of the farm to fork food chain. Farmers that utilize GAP principles in their production proactively take steps to reduce the possibility of producing unsafe food products. County Extension Offices provide GAP training to producers throughout the state.

From 2008 to 2017:

  • Oldham County Extension has provided 15 GAP training sessions to 56 producers.
  • These producers sell products in at least 44 markets, community supported agriculture sites, grocery stores, and restaurants.
  • These producers sell in Oldham, Jefferson, Henry, Shelby, Trimble, and Barren counties.

At a conservative estimate of 500 consumers reached through each market, this represents a minimum of 22,000 consumers purchasing foods that have been safely produced by local farmers. GAP is an ongoing training program offered periodically throughout the year at Oldham County Extension, with training verified through the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

oc canning classes

Oldham County Extension also targets food safety during canning classes. Following Canning Boot Camp in June 2017, twenty-five Oldham Countians reported that they could identify research-based methods for home food preservation, safe methods of canning low and high acid foods, and signs of spoilage in home canned goods. Participants with intermediate to skilled canning experience indicated plans to increase the amount of food that they canned.

Stretching Your Food Dollars

Although Oldham County is one of Kentucky’s healthiest and wealthiest counties, over 5,100 residents live in poverty. Struggling Oldham County residents learn food budgeting tips at the Oldham County Extension office.

Over the past year, the FCS agent taught a series of seven Economical Entrée classes for Extension Homemakers and the general public. This “train the trainer” program reached more than 1,533 people in Oldham and surrounding counties. Post-lesson survey results showed that 99% of participants understood the entrée’s role according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 95% could identify economical proteins, and 94% felt confident planning meals using economical entrees. A six month follow-up survey revealed 89% of participants use new skills to prepare economical entrees at home and estimate saving $25.00 or more on monthly food expenses.

economical entrees

Extension programming emphasizes utilizing available resources to help provide nutritious food for a growing family. In 2013, Sheila N. attended a series of “Cooking on a Budget” classes that were held at the Oldham County Extension office. Her husband being an avid hunter, Sheila was looking for ways to make meals with the wild game that her family would find more appealing. Along with meal planning and money-saving strategies, the FCS agent provided easy and economical recipes that included venison and other wild game. Recently, Sheila reported that her family now boasts that they have the most delicious meals using wild game. Plus, Sheila has been able to be a stay at home mom and provide care for her children.

To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget. Of the 70 plus families that receive supplemental food each month, more than 40% report using recipes and tips to save an average of $20.00 a week.

Inmates Pursue Healthier Lifestyles

The National Institute on Drug Abuse asserts that successful addiction treatment helps an addict become drug-free, stay drug-free, and be productive member of the family. In an effort to address the latter, the Oldham County Extension EFNEP assistant partnered with Roederer Correctional Complex to bring nutrition education to their substance abuse program. Lessons from the Healthy Choices curriculum focus on helping prepare inmates for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Since the fall of 2016, approximately 60 participants have learned how to use nutrition labels to find healthy food choices for their families, proper food safety techniques, and stretch food dollars. Extension also provides low-salt, low-sugar versions of common recipes, such as Bean and Corn Salsa for healthier tailgating.

healthy food choices

Multiple participants noted the importance in keeping a daily food journal, especially in the case of previous health issues. One man expressed his hope that his diabetic wife could use this strategy to improve her eating habits.

Written by Chris Duncan, Oldham County Extension Family & Consumer Science Agent; Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Sherry Ragsdale, Expanded Food and Nutrition Program Assistant.

Advertisements

Take a Hike in Oldham County

National Take a Hike Day

hike in oldham county

Free Hiking Trails

The CDC recommends that adults shoot for 150 minutes of exercise per week. Take advantage of National Take a Hike Day on November 17, and find a new place to exercise! From public parks to nature preserves, beautiful Oldham County is home to a variety of green spaces.

Briar Hill Park

The hiking trail at Briar Hill Park is a natural path through the woods that takes you past a creek. Walkers and cyclists are welcome on the paved path that surrounds the playground area. In addition to walking trails, this 52-acre park offers picnic shelters, restrooms, basketball court, sand volleyball court, and tennis courts. A mountain biking trail is also under reconstruction, according to the Kentucky Mountain Bike Association.

Briar Hill Park is located at 7400 East Orchard Grass Boulevard in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve

Over nine miles of trails crisscross the 170 acres of Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve. Oldham County Master Gardeners tend the two-acre Woodland Garden, found along the forested trails. The nature preserve is also home to a frog pond, Nature Center, small waterfall, and Harmony Park.

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve is located at 12501 Harmony Landing Road in Goshen.

oldham county hiking trails

Morgan Conversation Park

More than 200 acres of woodlands await you at the Morgan Conservation Park. Oldham County Parks and Recreation have announced that a shelter is coming soon.

“Morgan Conservation Park is a hidden gem with several trails (some steep, but worth it), good sized creek that begs exploration, small waterfalls, an old barn, ponds, a glade, meadows, and an old family burial site.”
Oldham Family Fun

Morgan Conservation Park is located at 1200 Kentucky 524 in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Peggy E. Baker Park

Home of South Oldham Little League, Peggy Baker Park offers 25 acres of open, green space for many kinds of activities. Other amenities include a playground, basketball court, picnic shelter, and restrooms.

Peggy E. Baker Park is located at 6887 Route 2858 in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Pewee Valley Central Park

Tucked behind the Little Colonel Playhouse, Pewee Valley Central Park is a beautiful green space right in the center of town. The city council originally envisioned this project, and passionate volunteers expedited the transformation of the space. Walkers can enjoy a short, paved, walking trail complete with benches, a small bridge over a fish pond, and covered pavilion. A red caboose is a short walk away from the park.

Central Park is located at 105 Central Avenue in Pewee Valley.

Wendell Moore Park

Covering 107 acres, Wendell Moore Park is a multi-functional venue. Here you’ll find the John W. Black Community Center, offices of Oldham County Parks and Recreation, Aquatic Center, and Elizabeth Cleland Cauley Dog Park. Wendell Moore is also the home of Oldham County Youth Football. Amenities include walking trails, picnic shelters, restrooms, playgrounds, horseshoe pits, disc golf courses, tennis courts, two softball fields with a concession area, and a lake for fishing from either the bank or docks.

Paved walking trails traverse the park’s gently rolling hills, offering multiple distances for walkers and cyclists.

Wendell Moore Park is located at 1551 North Highway 393 in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Westport Park

This five-acre park sits on the Ohio River in the northern end of Oldham County. A large green space surrounds the playground. Westport Park also offers a picnic shelter, restrooms, basketball court, horse pits, fishing dock, boat ramp, and boat dock. This is the home of the annual River Daze Festival, sponsored by Friends of Westport.

Westport Park is located at 6617 Main Street in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Wilborn Park

Found on the L&N Lake, this 30-acre park offers a paved walking trail situated around a playground and restrooms. Natural trails cross wooden bridges back and forth across the lake which is open to fisherman. Wilborn Park also has a covered pavilion.

Wilborn Park is located near 201 Lakeshore Drive in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

More Oldham County Hiking

Brownsboro Alliance

Membership is required to access the Brownsboro Alliance trail system. Hikers and horseback riders can enjoy over 14 miles of trails through Oldham County farm- and woodlands. Parking is available by the trailhead on Foxhollow Farm.

The Brownsboro Alliance Trailhead is located at the intersection of Highways 329 & 1694 in Crestwood.

Oldham County Greenways

Oldham County Greenways is a non-profit project working to establish an Interurban Greenway that will connect La Grange and Pewee Valley. Completed projects include pathways and the disc golf course at Wendell Moore Park and a three-mile trail along Commerce Parkway in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens

Formerly the site of the Klein Farm and Nursery, Yew Dell Yew Dell boasts fantastic gardens and a stone castle. This historical site is also home to three woodland ponds and more than a mile of hiking trails. A printable hiking trail map is available on Yew Dell’s website. An admission fee helps support continued preservation efforts.

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens is located at 6220 Old LaGrange Road in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Photos by Lauren State Fernandez; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Ann Stroth, Studio VII inc.

Loneliness Affects Your Health

The Following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 26, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

loneliness affects your health

Socialization Affects Your Health

Just as we need food and water to survive, we also need meaningful social relationships and connections. We are wired for social contact, so going without it increases the risks to jeopardize our overall health, well-being, and quality of life. While it is okay to feel lonely and to be alone on occasion, chronic loneliness can cause serious health concerns. Researchers continue to demonstrate how important meaningful relationships with others are to our mental, emotional, and physical health.

If not addressed, loneliness can lead to social isolation, physical and mental decline, and depression. Recent studies have shown that social isolation can also lead to a number of negative health impacts including poor sleeping patterns, a disrupted immune system, poor nutrition, destruction of arteries, and high blood pressure. When the need for socialization is not met, it can also negatively affect learning, memory, and motivation.

Loneliness can occur at any age and can be a normal feeling — especially after a break-up, a move to a new location, loss of a loved one, or exclusion from a group. On the other hand, chronic loneliness (feeling lonely, isolated, or lacking in close connections for an extended period of time) can bring about discomfort and distress, including feeling sad, empty, isolated, distanced from others, deprived, and filled with longing. These feelings lead to many problems. Children and teens, for example, are more likely to adopt an outcast status, have problems in or drop out of school, or even become delinquent. Lonely adults are at greater risk of alcoholism and depression. Those living alone are at greater risk of suicide.

Loneliness is particularly prevalent among older adults. As we age, our social circle shrinks, which makes it more difficult to have meaningful interactions with others. According to a 2013 AARP study, the percentage of adults who say they are lonely has doubled from 20 percent in the 1980s to 40 percent today. About 30 percent of adults older than 65 live alone. That number jumps to 50 percent in adults over 85.

loneliness negatively affects health

If you are experiencing loneliness, you are not alone, and you don’t have to be as there are many ways to increase your social interactions. Consider the following tips:

  • Find a cause to be passionate about and donate your time. There are many community organizations in Oldham County in need of volunteers: Humane Society of Oldham County, Oldham County Red Cross, Crossroads Pregnancy Center, Dare to Care Food Bank, and many more. Not only will you get to interact with others, but you will also get satisfaction from giving back.
  • Don’t miss opportunities to interact with your family. Attend family events like reunions and weddings. If you have grandkids who live close, consider attending one of their extracurricular activities, such as a ballgame or a dance recital. The socialization will positively impact your health and also encourage the child to practice and try harder.
  • Take up a hobby. Find something you are passionate about or learn more about something you already enjoy. Consider joining a group that shares your interests, such as a writing group at the Oldham County Public Library or the knitters at Friends and Fiber in La Grange.

The Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service offers many opportunities for social interaction including Extension Homemaker clubs, Master Gardener programs, Master Clothing Volunteers, Master Cattleman, 4-H volunteer opportunities, and all kinds of classes on various subjects. Find out more about local extension events by contacting us via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can visit oldham.ca.uky.edu or facebook.com/OldhamCo to learn more about upcoming events.

loneliness affects your health

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Hosier, Associate Extension Professor for Family Life Education, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Heart Disease in Men

exercise for good health

Heart Disease in Men

Adult Health Bulletin

Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease, is a term used to describe a wide variety of heart conditions, the most common being coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease can cause a heart attack. Other heart diseases affect the valves in the heart or the ability of the heart to pump blood effectively. Men and women alike are at risk for heart disease, and in fact, it is the leading cause of death for both Kentucky men and women.

Heart Disease Facts About Men

  • The leading cause of death for men in the United States is heart disease. It is the cause for almost one out of four male deaths.
  • Half of men who die from heart disease did not have any previous symptoms.
  • Of all sudden cardiac events, 70 to 89 percent occur in men.

heart health & blood pressure

Key Risk Factors for Heart Disease

  • High blood pressure (also known as hypertension)
  • High LDL cholesterol
  • Smoking

Other risk factors include:

  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Poor diet
  • Inactivity
  • Excessive alcohol

men's heart health

According to the American Heart Association:

  • Among men age 20 and older, 33.4 percent of white males and 42.6 perfect of African American males have high blood pressure.
  • 41.3 percent of U.S. males over the age of 20 have a total cholesterol level over 200mg/dL.
  • 21.3 percent of males smoke cigarettes.
  • Approximately 72.9 percent of men age 20 and older are overweight or obese.
  • Of approximately 19.7 million Americans with diabetes, about 9.6 million are men (almost 49 percent).

Having a healthy heart is very important. How well are you taking care of yours?

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reference material from the American Heart Association.

Staying Positive Provides Health Benefits

Importance of Staying Positive

Adult Health Bulletin

Did you know there are actually health benefits to positive thinking? According to research, people have fewer physical complaints if they think positively and reflect on things they are grateful for at least once a week. Staying positive is an important part of mental health.

health benefits from positive thinking

Staying Positive

When you are positive, it does not mean that you should ignore challenges or tough times, rather positive thinking is trying to see the bright side as much as possible. It may take some time and practice to start thinking more positively. Try these tips for living a more positive life:

  • Write down dreams and goals. One way to stay positive is to write down your goals and dreams for the future. By writing them down, you are actually setting the groundwork for reaching your goal. Be detailed about what you want and how you think you can reach that dream or goal.
  • Say thank you. Being thankful and expressing gratitude is an important part of staying positive. You can do this in many ways, such as keeping a journal of things you are grateful for, writing a letter to someone who made a difference in your life, and making an effort to say “thank you” to all people who helped you throughout the week.
  • Avoid worrying. For some people, worrying is part of everyday life. Instead of worrying, try to find a way to solve the problem you are facing. You may also try to distract yourself from worrying if it is something beyond your control.

healthy lifestyle

  • Watch out for all-or-nothing thinking. Remember that if something does not go the way you think it should go, it does not mean that it will always be that way. That one time was that one time. Take steps to have a different outcome if it is something that you can control.
  • Slow down. Sometimes, when things are moving too fast, we get stressed. Lots of stress can lead to negative thinking. If you are feeling stressed — whether that is happening while talking, eating, or even rushing around to get something done — take the time slow down. Slowing down will allow you to think clearly about what you need to do.
  • Eat well and stay active. Did you know that eating unhealthy food and not being active can actually make you feel worse? On the other hand, eating healthy foods and staying active on a regular basis helps improve your mood and general health.

stay positive and eat healthy

It can be hard to develop healthy habits like staying positive. Try some of these different ways to stay positive and see how much better you will feel!

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from Mental Health America.

Adult Health Screenings

adult health screenings

Health Screenings

Adult Health Bulletin

Every adult should get screened for illnesses when they visit their healthcare provider. Some screenings can be done right in the provider’s office. There are some screenings that need special equipment and may need to be done at a separate appointment.

General Screenings

  • Diabetes: This illness can cause many problems with your body including, but not limited to: heart, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. You should get screened if you have high blood pressure or take medicine for high blood pressure.
  • Hepatitis C Virus (Hep C): Hep C is an infection of the liver. You should get screened one time for Hep C if you were born between 1945 and 1965 or if you received a blood transfusion before 1992.

High Blood Cholesterol Screening

High blood cholesterol can lead to dangerous disease like heart disease or stroke. Have your blood cholesterol checked regularly with a blood if:

  • You use tobacco.
  • You are overweight or obese.
  • You have a history of heart disease or blocked arteries.
  • Your family has a history of heart disease.

High Blood Pressure Screening

High blood pressure can cause strokes, heart attacks, kidney and eye problems, and heart failure. Your blood pressure should be checked at least every two years.

high blood blood facts

Lung Cancer Screening

You should talk to your healthcare provider about a lung cancer screening if you are between the ages of 55 and 80, smoke now, or have quit within the past 15 years.

Colon Cancer Screening

A person between the ages of 50 and 75 should get a colon cancer screening. This screening can be done in several ways, so talk to your healthcare provider about your options. If your family has a history, you may want to talk to your healthcare provider about getting screened before the age of 50.

Women Specific Screenings

  • Osteoporosis: This test is used to make sure you have strong bones. This screening can also be done in several different ways. Talk to your healthcare provider about getting this screening done.
  • Breast Cancer: A mammogram is the screening test used to detect breast cancer. Talk to your healthcare provider about scheduling a mammogram and how often it is needed.
  • Cervical Cancer: This screening is one that typically starts around the age of 21 and is continued until around the age of 65. Talk to your healthcare provider about the screening called a Pap smear. Your provider may also encourage you to be tested for human papillomavirus, also known as HPV.

health screenings

Screenings are important ways to make sure that you do not have an illness or disease without symptoms. It is important to talk with your healthcare provider to determine which screenings are needed for you.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reference material from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Tips for Getting (and Staying) Healthy

healthy lifestyle

Create & Keep a New Healthy Habit

Adult Health Bulletin

Habits can be good or they can be not-so-good. Have you ever tried to change one of your not-so-good habits, only to go back to your usual routine? It can be hard to keep up the motivation for a change in behavior.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when you are trying to create and keep a new, healthy habit.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #1

It does not have to be “all or nothing.” Many times when we start to change a behavior, we tend to think that we need to be perfect 100 percent, with no slip-ups. Staying motivated at that pace is hard, especially if you are trying to change too many things at once. Instead, start small. If you want to start walking, find a time for just 10 minutes and build up to 30 minutes. If you want to start eating healthier, choose one meal a day to start. Pack a healthy lunch from home instead of getting lunch from a fast food place.

Just remember that you do not have to do everything all at once.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #2

Be creative. It can be hard to find the time to make healthy habits. If you get creative, you may be able to get a little “extra” accomplished. Instead of looking for the best parking spot, park in the back of the lot and walk, or take the stairs rather than the elevator. If focusing on making healthy food choices, pack your favorite fruit as a treat for that midday slump, or add green vegetables to a smoothie. These little boosts will help you reach your goal.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #3

Be patient with yourself. Creating and sticking with a new health habit is hard. And remember that it can take time to see results when making a change. You could write down your actions and keep track of successes and areas for improvement. Don’t forget to celebrate the successes that you have. Small successes can add up to big changes!

happy healthy lifestyle

Changing habits is very difficult. When trying to create and keep a new health habit, think about starting small to achieve your goals, be creative in changing your habits, and be patient with yourself as you strive to develop a healthier lifestyle.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Mayo Clinic.

Fun Summer Activities for Teens

Challenge Your Teen’s Brain over Summer Vacation

While many adolescents look forward to summer vacation, it is not uncommon for them to quickly grow bored. Bored teens often turn to television and electronics. With a little encouragement, however, a teen can transform a bored brain into one that is healthy and active, and in turn, create a most memorable summer vacation.

Activities that can keep your teen happy, fit, and healthy include:

  • Spend time as a family. Go on vacation or create “stay-cations” to explore your own community or state.
  • Hold family/neighborhood Olympics. Create a day (or weekend) of fun physical and mental activities that can played on teams. Have contests and medals.
  • Go for a hike, bike ride, or find other ways to be physically active. Explore new trails, terrain, or a nature center. Oldham County parks offer trails, picnic shelters, basketball courts, horseshoe pits, disc golf, and more!

ky tree park

  • Hold a family board game or card night.
  • Plan an outdoor movie night in the backyard.
  • Make food fun. Play “chopped” kitchen or “iron chef,” or put each member of the family in charge of planning a menu and making dinner as a family.
    Find new recipes on the Kentucky Proud website.

  • Volunteer as a family and get involved in the community. Soup kitchens, homeless shelters, churches, hospitals, nursing homes, libraries, and humane societies are often looking for help. Community service can provide a teen with a sense of accomplishment and purpose.
    Places to volunteer in Oldham County include Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve, the Humane Society of Oldham County, Mission Crestwood, Yew Dell Botanical Gardens, and more.
  • Start a garden. Use it for pizzas, salad, or flowers. Gardens offer both nutritional and psychological benefits.
  • Plan an event. Planning a party such as a back-to-school barbecue can teach a teen planning, budgeting, and organizing.

Written by Amy F. Hosier, Extension Family Life Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Reference: Witmer, D. (2017). 6 Types of Fun Summer Activities for Teens. Retrieved online May 18, 2017.

Broccoli a Great, Nutritious Option at Farmer’s Market

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the June 22, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Farmers Market Broccoli

With June comes the start of summer and an abundance of fresh produce available at farmers markets across Oldham County. One in-season produce offering that you may not necessarily associate with late spring and early summer is broccoli.

Broccoli actually has two growing seasons in Kentucky. Kentucky growers began harvesting their first crop in May and will continue to harvest through early July. The second season ends with a harvest in the late fall.

You can steam, boil and microwave broccoli – or even enjoy it raw. As you will see in the Plate It up! Kentucky Proud recipe that follows, it can give a flavorful and healthy twist to popular summer dishes.

Broccoli is one of the most nutrient-dense vegetables that you can eat. It is a good source of vitamins A and C, beta carotene, folic acid and phytochemicals. Due to their high antioxidant levels, researchers recommend you consume several servings of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (like cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts) several times a week. A diet high in antioxidants can reduce your risk of developing some forms of cancer as well as heart disease.

When shopping at the market, choose broccoli that has tender, young, dark-green stalks with tightly closed buds. If you purchase about one and one-half pounds of broccoli, you’ll get four, one-half cup servings. Store broccoli, unwashed, in the refrigerator for no more than three to five days in a perforated plastic bag. Wash just before preparing to maintain its texture and prevent mold from forming.

Contact the Oldham County Extension office for more information on ways to prepare in-season produce and local farmers market offerings. Find Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud recipes online, or contact the extension office for recipe cards.

healthy broccoli recipe

Broccoli Grape Pasta Salad

Healthy Recipe

Broccoli Salad Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup diced pecans
  • 8 ounces whole grain pasta (bow tie or other)
  • 5 slices turkey bacon
  • 2 cups seedless red grapes
  • 1 pound fresh broccoli
  • 3/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup diced red onion
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar

healthy broccoli grapes recipe

Broccoli Salad Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake pecans in a single layer in a shallow pan for five to seven minutes or until lightly toasted and fragrant, stirring halfway through.
  2. Prepare eight ounces of pasta according to package directions.
  3. Cook bacon according to package directions. Cool and crumble into small pieces.
  4. Cut the broccoli florets from the stems and separate florets into small pieces using the tip of a paring knife.
  5. Slice two cups of grapes into halves.
  6. Whisk together mayonnaise, honey, diced red onion and vinegar in a large mixing bowl.
  7. Add broccoli, cooked pasta and grapes; stir to coat.
  8. Cover and chill for 30 minutes. Stir in bacon crumbles and diced pecans, just before serving.

Nutritional Analysis: 160 calories, 7 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 5 mg cholesterol, 125 mg sodium, 24 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 4 g protein.

Yield: 16, 1/2-cup servings

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status or physical or mental disability.

Written by Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Assistant Extension Professor. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Tips for Spring Allergy Sufferers

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the May 11, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Spring Allergy Tips

Spring is a time for renewal, but if you suffer from seasonal allergies, nature’s rebirth can make this time of year miserable.

Hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, starts with cold-like symptoms. Unlike a cold that goes away in seven to ten days, an allergic reaction tends to linger until its source is identified and treated or no longer present. One of the most common causes of spring allergies is high pollen counts. Depending upon the type of pollen you are allergic to, this could happen at various points in the season. Different types of pollen peak at different times.

To reduce your exposure to pollen, monitor local pollen counts and take necessary precautions when the type of pollen you are allergic to is high. Precautions can include such things as starting to take allergy medicines or closing the windows in your home at night. Other tips include:

  • Stay inside on dry, windy days.
  • Change your clothes and shower after being outside to remove pollen.
  • Do not hang laundry outside.
  • Avoid being outdoors in the morning, when pollen counts are the highest.
  • Use air conditioning to cool your house or car.
  • Vacuum your floors often.

Seasonal allergies can develop at any time during your life and are not necessarily something you are born with. Sometimes signs of allergies aren’t straightforward, as it can be hard to distinguish an allergy from the common cold.

This is especially true with children. If you or your child has cold symptoms that last more than a week or seem to occur at the same time every year, you may want to talk with your healthcare provider about it. Only a certified healthcare provider can diagnose allergies and prescribe treatments.

More information on healthy living is available at the Oldham County Extension office. Call (502) 222-9453 and ask for Chris Duncan, Family and Consumer Science Agent.

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Senior Extension Specialist. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.