How to Set Fitness Goals

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the June 7, 2018 edition of the Oldham Era.

exercise for good health

Fitness Beginnings: Fitness Goal Setting

Made a decision to get healthier but unsure where to start? Adding physical activity to your routine is a great way to improve your mind, mood, and body.

Adults need 150 minutes of physical activity each week. Don’t be overwhelmed! You can split this up into 10-minute segments of physical activity throughout the week. Make an appointment with yourself every day (and keep it!) to ensure you meet this goal.

Now that you are determined to increase your physical activity, think about your health goals and how increasing your movement will help you achieve them. Remember to set SMART goals, or ones that are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Timely.

A specific goal should clearly spell out what you want to achieve, where it will take place, and the time period. An example of a specific goal is walking for at least 30 minutes, in your neighborhood, five days a week.

Once you’ve decided on specifics, figure out how you will measure your progress. Think about amounts of activity and the length of time.

fitness goal setting

Often, we want immediate success. That’s where the attainable part of SMART goal setting comes in. An attainable goal is realistic and something you can actually do. As much as we would all like lose 20 pounds in two weeks, the chances are highly unlikely that it will happen. In fact, most people trying to lose weight should aim to lose about 1-2 pounds per week for healthy and sustainable weight loss. Keep that in mind as you are setting your fitness goals.

The next step is for you to examine the importance of the goal relevant to where you are in your life. For example, you may not necessarily be interested in weight loss right now but may instead choose to add physical activity to reduce stress or improve your mood.

The last part of SMART is timeliness. This is when you set time to complete your goal, whether it is short or long term. A short-term goal may be to lose 15 pounds within two months, whereas a long-term goal could be to maintain that weight loss for an entire year.

For more information on physical activity goal setting, contact the Oldham County Extension office.

hike to get fit

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Natalie Jones, University of Kentucky Physical Activity Program Coordinator, and Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

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Tips for Avoiding Homesickness

The following 4-H Youth Development article originally printed in the 2018 Summer edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

kids at camp

Handling Homesickness

Going away for a night or even away at camp for a few nights can be a lot of fun. But for some kids, it can be really hard to be away from home. Here are some things you can do that will help you stay and enjoy all the fun.

  • Bring a little part of home with you: For an overnight stay, it may be helpful to bring something from home. Think about your favorite toy or wear your favorite pajamas. You may also want to take a picture of your family that you can look at from time to time.
  • Stay busy: when you are busy having fun, you have less time to think about being home. If you are at an overnight sleepover, play games, dance, and enjoy the time with your friends. If you are at an overnight camp, think about all of the activities that you have to choose from and perhaps even try something new!
  • Talk to someone: For some kids, just letting someone else know that you are feeling a little homesick can help you feel better. Whether it is a friend or a counselor, he or she may have some other ideas to help you have fun and not think about being away from home.
  • Practice: It may seem silly, but it may be helpful to practice being away from home. This may mean staying at a friend’s house for a few hours before trying to stay for an overnight visit. Maybe try checking out a day camp before going to an overnight camp.

If you sometimes feel a little homesick, remember that it is okay and that there are ways to lesson that feeling. A lot of kids feel homesick, and even some adults!

oc kids at camp

Source: Nicole Peritore, Extension Specialist for Family Health, University of Kentucky. Edited by Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Classes on Cooking, Gardening, Sewing & More

The following Family & Consumer Sciences articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Homemaker Lessons – Open to the Public

Louisville Area Needlework • March 13, Shelby County Extension

Learn about Silk Ribbon, Cross Stitch, Basic Needle, Crewel Embroidery, and Creative Stitchery. Pick up an information packet at the Oldham County Extension Office, or contact us for the registration materials. Registration is due Thursday, March 8, to the Bullitt County Extension Office.

health classes

Couch Potato Challenge • March 22, 10:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension

A 12-week set of walking challenges based on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institutes’ walking plan, this program helps you get started walking at a pace that is comfortable for you! RSVP via (502) 222-9453.

gardening in small spaces

Gardening in Small Spaces • April 26, 10:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension

Gardening is one of America’s most popular hobbies, and rightly so. Gardening activities help promote healthy habits. The physical activity of working in the garden burns calories. As well, consuming home-grown vegetables is good for your health. Lesson taught by Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agent. Save your seat by emailing lauren.state@uky.edu or calling (502) 222-9453.

Come Sew With Us

Sewing classes are free and open to the public! All ages welcome — youth must be accompanied by an adult. The project of the day is not mandatory; you are encouraged to bring your own project to work on. Project supply lists are available online. Please call and reserve your seat.

Monograming • Monday, March 26, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Gardening & Outdoor Accessories • Monday, April 23, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.

oldham county sewing class

Cooking for Diabetics & Everyone Else Too!

Making healthy food choices is part of managing diabetes. At 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, April 11, learn about cooking healthy, easy meals that are both economical and tasty. This free class takes place at the Oldham County Extension Office. Call (502) 222-9453 to reserve your seat.

Looking Ahead to Summer

Mark your calendars! Canning Boot Camp will premiere at 6:30 p.m. on June 7, to be repeated at 10:00 a.m. on June 8.

Jefferson County is hosting this year’s Louisville Area Homemakers Annual Meeting on Monday, June 25. The meeting will be held at Riverside, The Farnsley-Moremen Landing, located at 7410 Moorman Road in Louisville. Watch your email for more details.

Kids’ Cooking Camp is scheduled for June 26 and 27. Further details to be announced.

Written by Chris Duncan, Family & Consumer Sciences Agent, and Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Stay Warm For Your Health

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the December 28, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Keep Warm This Winter

As the mercury drops on the thermometer, remember to stay warm both indoors and outdoors for your health. This is particularly true for older adults as they tend to lose body heat faster than younger adults.

Not staying warm enough can lead to hypothermia. This condition occurs when your body temperature drops too low. For older adults, that number is around 95 degrees F. Hypothermia can lead to many other health problems including heart attack, kidney problems and liver damage. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than half of all hypothermia-related deaths are in adults 65 years and older.

You may not notice early signs of hypothermia. They include cold hands and feet, a puffy or swollen face, pale skin, confusion, anger and sleepiness. Later signs of hypothermia include trouble walking or clumsiness; stiff, jerky arm and leg movements; slow heartbeat; slow, shallow breaths and blacking out. Shivering can be an early sign of hypothermia but is not a guarantee. In fact, some people experiencing hypothermia do not shiver at all.

Being outside during cold weather or even inside a chilly house can cause hypothermia. Try to stay inside on chilly days, especially those that are also windy and damp. If you cannot stay in, remember to dress in loose fitting layers to keep yourself warm and wear a hat and scarf as you tend to lose a lot of body heat from your head and neck. Keep your thermostat set at 68 degrees F or higher to make sure you stay warm enough inside during the winter. Remember to also wear warm clothes while inside and use blankets for additional warmth. If you are worried about heating costs, close off doors and vents in unused rooms. Keep the basement door closed at all times, and put rolled up towels by doors to block drafts.

stay warm for your health

Medical conditions including thyroid disease, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, memory loss and arthritis can make it harder for you to stay warm. Some prescription and over-the-counter medications can also affect body heat. Talk to your doctor about ways to stay warm if you have these conditions and before you start or stop any medication.

If you think yourself or a loved one is experiencing hypothermia, seek immediate medical attention. For more information on weather-related issues or healthy aging, visit the Oldham County Extension office, located at 1815 North Highway 393 in Buckner.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Kostelic, UK Extension Specialist in Family Life Education.

Extension Builds Healthy Kentuckians

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the November 9, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

extension builds healthy Kentuckians

FCS Extension Builds Strong, Healthy Kentuckians

In Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Extension, we help individuals develop the skills they need to improve quality of life for themselves and their families. We offer a variety of educational programs throughout the year, including cooking and nutrition classes, sewing workshops, financial stability talks, and much more. In the past programming year, we reached more than 1.6 million Kentuckians.

These programs have made a meaningful impact across the state. Our Truth and Consequences Program, which focuses on the realities of substance abuse, has changed the lives of young Kentuckians. In a recent survey, more than 400 of them reported that they know of peers who no longer engage in substance abuse because of the program.

tips for getting healthy

Extension offers health-related programs for all age groups that focus on eating healthy and increasing physical activity. Due to these efforts, more than 12,000 Kentuckians made a lifestyle change to improve their health. FCS Extension agents also work closely with local farmers markets to promote fresh produce consumption. By conducting Plate It Up Kentucky Proud food demonstrations and offering recipe cards during the markets, agents increased Kentucky farmers market sales by more than $17,000. Oldham County FCS Agent Chris Duncan partnered with Oldham County Fiscal Court to bring food demonstrations and nutrition tips to Oldham County TV. “Cooking With Chris” can be found online by visiting www.oldhamcounty.net/oldham-county-tv.

Educating low-income families on the benefits of healthier eating and buying fresh foods resulted in redemption of more than $61,000 in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; Women, Infants and Children; or senior benefits at the state’s farmers markets. To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget.

Oldham County Extension also brings nutrition education to inmates in the substance abuse program at Roederer Correctional. Lessons focus on preparing the men for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Through various career preparation programs, we spread knowledge that helps Kentuckians attain employment or find a more fulfilling job. In the past year, more than 43,000 people used practical living skills learned through FCS Extension to advance their education or employment.

We are home to a vibrant group of Extension Homemakers. These members engage in numerous outreach projects to better their communities and Kentucky. One such project is the ovarian cancer screening fundraising program. Each year, Extension Homemakers contribute to this UK Markey Cancer Center program, which provides free ovarian cancer screenings to Kentucky women. Since fundraising began 40 years ago, Extension Homemakers have given $1.4 million to that effort. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also contribute to Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

For more information on local Family and Consumer Sciences programs, contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can also visit us online at oldham.ca.uky.edu.

extension food safety classes

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Jennifer Hunter, Interim Assistant Director of Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Extension Teaches Food Safety & Nutrition Classes

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources and Family & Consumer Science articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Food Safety in Oldham County

Oldham and surrounding counties are home to many farmers markets, roadside farm markets, and community supported agriculture sites. Additionally, some farms sell to grocery stores and restaurants. A concern for producers and consumers is safe production, harvest, handling, and storage of food to minimize risk of microbial and other contaminant-related sicknesses.

farmers market produce

The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky Department of Agriculture developed Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) guidelines to reduce the likelihood of produce contamination. It focuses on safe techniques and inputs on all levels of the farm to fork food chain. Farmers that utilize GAP principles in their production proactively take steps to reduce the possibility of producing unsafe food products. County Extension Offices provide GAP training to producers throughout the state.

From 2008 to 2017:

  • Oldham County Extension has provided 15 GAP training sessions to 56 producers.
  • These producers sell products in at least 44 markets, community supported agriculture sites, grocery stores, and restaurants.
  • These producers sell in Oldham, Jefferson, Henry, Shelby, Trimble, and Barren counties.

At a conservative estimate of 500 consumers reached through each market, this represents a minimum of 22,000 consumers purchasing foods that have been safely produced by local farmers. GAP is an ongoing training program offered periodically throughout the year at Oldham County Extension, with training verified through the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

oc canning classes

Oldham County Extension also targets food safety during canning classes. Following Canning Boot Camp in June 2017, twenty-five Oldham Countians reported that they could identify research-based methods for home food preservation, safe methods of canning low and high acid foods, and signs of spoilage in home canned goods. Participants with intermediate to skilled canning experience indicated plans to increase the amount of food that they canned.

Stretching Your Food Dollars

Although Oldham County is one of Kentucky’s healthiest and wealthiest counties, over 5,100 residents live in poverty. Struggling Oldham County residents learn food budgeting tips at the Oldham County Extension office.

Over the past year, the FCS agent taught a series of seven Economical Entrée classes for Extension Homemakers and the general public. This “train the trainer” program reached more than 1,533 people in Oldham and surrounding counties. Post-lesson survey results showed that 99% of participants understood the entrée’s role according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 95% could identify economical proteins, and 94% felt confident planning meals using economical entrees. A six month follow-up survey revealed 89% of participants use new skills to prepare economical entrees at home and estimate saving $25.00 or more on monthly food expenses.

economical entrees

Extension programming emphasizes utilizing available resources to help provide nutritious food for a growing family. In 2013, Sheila N. attended a series of “Cooking on a Budget” classes that were held at the Oldham County Extension office. Her husband being an avid hunter, Sheila was looking for ways to make meals with the wild game that her family would find more appealing. Along with meal planning and money-saving strategies, the FCS agent provided easy and economical recipes that included venison and other wild game. Recently, Sheila reported that her family now boasts that they have the most delicious meals using wild game. Plus, Sheila has been able to be a stay at home mom and provide care for her children.

To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget. Of the 70 plus families that receive supplemental food each month, more than 40% report using recipes and tips to save an average of $20.00 a week.

Inmates Pursue Healthier Lifestyles

The National Institute on Drug Abuse asserts that successful addiction treatment helps an addict become drug-free, stay drug-free, and be productive member of the family. In an effort to address the latter, the Oldham County Extension EFNEP assistant partnered with Roederer Correctional Complex to bring nutrition education to their substance abuse program. Lessons from the Healthy Choices curriculum focus on helping prepare inmates for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Since the fall of 2016, approximately 60 participants have learned how to use nutrition labels to find healthy food choices for their families, proper food safety techniques, and stretch food dollars. Extension also provides low-salt, low-sugar versions of common recipes, such as Bean and Corn Salsa for healthier tailgating.

healthy food choices

Multiple participants noted the importance in keeping a daily food journal, especially in the case of previous health issues. One man expressed his hope that his diabetic wife could use this strategy to improve her eating habits.

Written by Chris Duncan, Oldham County Extension Family & Consumer Science Agent; Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Sherry Ragsdale, Expanded Food and Nutrition Program Assistant.

Take a Hike in Oldham County

National Take a Hike Day

hike in oldham county

Free Hiking Trails

The CDC recommends that adults shoot for 150 minutes of exercise per week. Take advantage of National Take a Hike Day on November 17, and find a new place to exercise! From public parks to nature preserves, beautiful Oldham County is home to a variety of green spaces.

Briar Hill Park

The hiking trail at Briar Hill Park is a natural path through the woods that takes you past a creek. Walkers and cyclists are welcome on the paved path that surrounds the playground area. In addition to walking trails, this 52-acre park offers picnic shelters, restrooms, basketball court, sand volleyball court, and tennis courts. A mountain biking trail is also under reconstruction, according to the Kentucky Mountain Bike Association.

Briar Hill Park is located at 7400 East Orchard Grass Boulevard in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve

Over nine miles of trails crisscross the 170 acres of Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve. Oldham County Master Gardeners tend the two-acre Woodland Garden, found along the forested trails. The nature preserve is also home to a frog pond, Nature Center, small waterfall, and Harmony Park.

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve is located at 12501 Harmony Landing Road in Goshen.

oldham county hiking trails

Morgan Conversation Park

More than 200 acres of woodlands await you at the Morgan Conservation Park. Oldham County Parks and Recreation have announced that a shelter is coming soon.

“Morgan Conservation Park is a hidden gem with several trails (some steep, but worth it), good sized creek that begs exploration, small waterfalls, an old barn, ponds, a glade, meadows, and an old family burial site.”
Oldham Family Fun

Morgan Conservation Park is located at 1200 Kentucky 524 in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Peggy E. Baker Park

Home of South Oldham Little League, Peggy Baker Park offers 25 acres of open, green space for many kinds of activities. Other amenities include a playground, basketball court, picnic shelter, and restrooms.

Peggy E. Baker Park is located at 6887 Route 2858 in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Pewee Valley Central Park

Tucked behind the Little Colonel Playhouse, Pewee Valley Central Park is a beautiful green space right in the center of town. The city council originally envisioned this project, and passionate volunteers expedited the transformation of the space. Walkers can enjoy a short, paved, walking trail complete with benches, a small bridge over a fish pond, and covered pavilion. A red caboose is a short walk away from the park.

Central Park is located at 105 Central Avenue in Pewee Valley.

Wendell Moore Park

Covering 107 acres, Wendell Moore Park is a multi-functional venue. Here you’ll find the John W. Black Community Center, offices of Oldham County Parks and Recreation, Aquatic Center, and Elizabeth Cleland Cauley Dog Park. Wendell Moore is also the home of Oldham County Youth Football. Amenities include walking trails, picnic shelters, restrooms, playgrounds, horseshoe pits, disc golf courses, tennis courts, two softball fields with a concession area, and a lake for fishing from either the bank or docks.

Paved walking trails traverse the park’s gently rolling hills, offering multiple distances for walkers and cyclists.

Wendell Moore Park is located at 1551 North Highway 393 in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Westport Park

This five-acre park sits on the Ohio River in the northern end of Oldham County. A large green space surrounds the playground. Westport Park also offers a picnic shelter, restrooms, basketball court, horse pits, fishing dock, boat ramp, and boat dock. This is the home of the annual River Daze Festival, sponsored by Friends of Westport.

Westport Park is located at 6617 Main Street in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Wilborn Park

Found on the L&N Lake, this 30-acre park offers a paved walking trail situated around a playground and restrooms. Natural trails cross wooden bridges back and forth across the lake which is open to fisherman. Wilborn Park also has a covered pavilion.

Wilborn Park is located near 201 Lakeshore Drive in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

More Oldham County Hiking

Brownsboro Alliance

Membership is required to access the Brownsboro Alliance trail system. Hikers and horseback riders can enjoy over 14 miles of trails through Oldham County farm- and woodlands. Parking is available by the trailhead on Foxhollow Farm.

The Brownsboro Alliance Trailhead is located at the intersection of Highways 329 & 1694 in Crestwood.

Oldham County Greenways

Oldham County Greenways is a non-profit project working to establish an Interurban Greenway that will connect La Grange and Pewee Valley. Completed projects include pathways and the disc golf course at Wendell Moore Park and a three-mile trail along Commerce Parkway in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens

Formerly the site of the Klein Farm and Nursery, Yew Dell Yew Dell boasts fantastic gardens and a stone castle. This historical site is also home to three woodland ponds and more than a mile of hiking trails. A printable hiking trail map is available on Yew Dell’s website. An admission fee helps support continued preservation efforts.

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens is located at 6220 Old LaGrange Road in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Photos by Lauren State Fernandez; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Ann Stroth, Studio VII inc.

Loneliness Affects Your Health

The Following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 26, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

loneliness affects your health

Socialization Affects Your Health

Just as we need food and water to survive, we also need meaningful social relationships and connections. We are wired for social contact, so going without it increases the risks to jeopardize our overall health, well-being, and quality of life. While it is okay to feel lonely and to be alone on occasion, chronic loneliness can cause serious health concerns. Researchers continue to demonstrate how important meaningful relationships with others are to our mental, emotional, and physical health.

If not addressed, loneliness can lead to social isolation, physical and mental decline, and depression. Recent studies have shown that social isolation can also lead to a number of negative health impacts including poor sleeping patterns, a disrupted immune system, poor nutrition, destruction of arteries, and high blood pressure. When the need for socialization is not met, it can also negatively affect learning, memory, and motivation.

Loneliness can occur at any age and can be a normal feeling — especially after a break-up, a move to a new location, loss of a loved one, or exclusion from a group. On the other hand, chronic loneliness (feeling lonely, isolated, or lacking in close connections for an extended period of time) can bring about discomfort and distress, including feeling sad, empty, isolated, distanced from others, deprived, and filled with longing. These feelings lead to many problems. Children and teens, for example, are more likely to adopt an outcast status, have problems in or drop out of school, or even become delinquent. Lonely adults are at greater risk of alcoholism and depression. Those living alone are at greater risk of suicide.

Loneliness is particularly prevalent among older adults. As we age, our social circle shrinks, which makes it more difficult to have meaningful interactions with others. According to a 2013 AARP study, the percentage of adults who say they are lonely has doubled from 20 percent in the 1980s to 40 percent today. About 30 percent of adults older than 65 live alone. That number jumps to 50 percent in adults over 85.

loneliness negatively affects health

If you are experiencing loneliness, you are not alone, and you don’t have to be as there are many ways to increase your social interactions. Consider the following tips:

  • Find a cause to be passionate about and donate your time. There are many community organizations in Oldham County in need of volunteers: Humane Society of Oldham County, Oldham County Red Cross, Crossroads Pregnancy Center, Dare to Care Food Bank, and many more. Not only will you get to interact with others, but you will also get satisfaction from giving back.
  • Don’t miss opportunities to interact with your family. Attend family events like reunions and weddings. If you have grandkids who live close, consider attending one of their extracurricular activities, such as a ballgame or a dance recital. The socialization will positively impact your health and also encourage the child to practice and try harder.
  • Take up a hobby. Find something you are passionate about or learn more about something you already enjoy. Consider joining a group that shares your interests, such as a writing group at the Oldham County Public Library or the knitters at Friends and Fiber in La Grange.

The Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service offers many opportunities for social interaction including Extension Homemaker clubs, Master Gardener programs, Master Clothing Volunteers, Master Cattleman, 4-H volunteer opportunities, and all kinds of classes on various subjects. Find out more about local extension events by contacting us via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can visit oldham.ca.uky.edu or facebook.com/OldhamCo to learn more about upcoming events.

loneliness affects your health

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Amy Hosier, Associate Extension Professor for Family Life Education, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Heart Disease in Men

exercise for good health

Heart Disease in Men

Adult Health Bulletin

Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease, is a term used to describe a wide variety of heart conditions, the most common being coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease can cause a heart attack. Other heart diseases affect the valves in the heart or the ability of the heart to pump blood effectively. Men and women alike are at risk for heart disease, and in fact, it is the leading cause of death for both Kentucky men and women.

Heart Disease Facts About Men

  • The leading cause of death for men in the United States is heart disease. It is the cause for almost one out of four male deaths.
  • Half of men who die from heart disease did not have any previous symptoms.
  • Of all sudden cardiac events, 70 to 89 percent occur in men.

heart health & blood pressure

Key Risk Factors for Heart Disease

  • High blood pressure (also known as hypertension)
  • High LDL cholesterol
  • Smoking

Other risk factors include:

  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Poor diet
  • Inactivity
  • Excessive alcohol

men's heart health

According to the American Heart Association:

  • Among men age 20 and older, 33.4 percent of white males and 42.6 perfect of African American males have high blood pressure.
  • 41.3 percent of U.S. males over the age of 20 have a total cholesterol level over 200mg/dL.
  • 21.3 percent of males smoke cigarettes.
  • Approximately 72.9 percent of men age 20 and older are overweight or obese.
  • Of approximately 19.7 million Americans with diabetes, about 9.6 million are men (almost 49 percent).

Having a healthy heart is very important. How well are you taking care of yours?

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reference material from the American Heart Association.

Staying Positive Provides Health Benefits

Importance of Staying Positive

Adult Health Bulletin

Did you know there are actually health benefits to positive thinking? According to research, people have fewer physical complaints if they think positively and reflect on things they are grateful for at least once a week. Staying positive is an important part of mental health.

health benefits from positive thinking

Staying Positive

When you are positive, it does not mean that you should ignore challenges or tough times, rather positive thinking is trying to see the bright side as much as possible. It may take some time and practice to start thinking more positively. Try these tips for living a more positive life:

  • Write down dreams and goals. One way to stay positive is to write down your goals and dreams for the future. By writing them down, you are actually setting the groundwork for reaching your goal. Be detailed about what you want and how you think you can reach that dream or goal.
  • Say thank you. Being thankful and expressing gratitude is an important part of staying positive. You can do this in many ways, such as keeping a journal of things you are grateful for, writing a letter to someone who made a difference in your life, and making an effort to say “thank you” to all people who helped you throughout the week.
  • Avoid worrying. For some people, worrying is part of everyday life. Instead of worrying, try to find a way to solve the problem you are facing. You may also try to distract yourself from worrying if it is something beyond your control.

healthy lifestyle

  • Watch out for all-or-nothing thinking. Remember that if something does not go the way you think it should go, it does not mean that it will always be that way. That one time was that one time. Take steps to have a different outcome if it is something that you can control.
  • Slow down. Sometimes, when things are moving too fast, we get stressed. Lots of stress can lead to negative thinking. If you are feeling stressed — whether that is happening while talking, eating, or even rushing around to get something done — take the time slow down. Slowing down will allow you to think clearly about what you need to do.
  • Eat well and stay active. Did you know that eating unhealthy food and not being active can actually make you feel worse? On the other hand, eating healthy foods and staying active on a regular basis helps improve your mood and general health.

stay positive and eat healthy

It can be hard to develop healthy habits like staying positive. Try some of these different ways to stay positive and see how much better you will feel!

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from Mental Health America.