10-Minute Bean Soup Recipe

healthy fast bean soup recipe

Soup Ingredients: 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 teaspoon minced garlic • 1/4 cup onion, finely chopped • 2 (15.8 ounce) cans of great northern beans, rinsed and drained • 1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes with basil, garlic, and oregano • 1 (14 ounce) can low-sodium vegetable or chicken broth • 4 cups kale, torn into small pieces • 1 tablespoon lemon juice • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions:

  1. In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium heat and saute garlic and onion for 3 minutes or until onion is tender.
  2. Add beans, tomatoes, and broth to saucepan. Stir and simmer for 5 minutes. Add kale and cook until tender, for about 2 minutes.
  3. Mix in lemon juice and Parmesan cheese just before serving. Optional, garnish with finely chopped fresh basil or dried basil.

Recipe Variations:

  • Cooked dried beans may be substituted for canned beans. Using prepared dry beans in place of canned will reduce sodium in this dish.
  • If you can’t find diced tomatoes with basil, garlic, and oregano, use regular diced tomatoes and add dried versions of these seasonings.
  • Opt for vegetable broth instead of chicken broth to make a vegetarian 10-minute bean soup. Make the soup vegan by leaving out the Parmesan cheese.

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Makes 4 servings.
Serving size: 1/4 of recipe
Cost per recipe: $6.52
Cost per serving: $1.63

Nutrition facts per serving: 400 calories, 8 g total fat, 2.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat, 10 mg cholesterol, 500 mg sodium, 62 g carbohydrate, 15 g fiber, 4 g sugar, 24 g protein, 140% Daily Value of vitamin A, 160% Daily Value of vitamin C, 40% Daily Value of calcium, 30% Daily Value of iron

Source: Caroline Durr, Area Nutrition Agent for Kentucky Nutrition Education Program, University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service

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Extension Builds Healthy Kentuckians

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the November 9, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

extension builds healthy Kentuckians

FCS Extension Builds Strong, Healthy Kentuckians

In Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Extension, we help individuals develop the skills they need to improve quality of life for themselves and their families. We offer a variety of educational programs throughout the year, including cooking and nutrition classes, sewing workshops, financial stability talks, and much more. In the past programming year, we reached more than 1.6 million Kentuckians.

These programs have made a meaningful impact across the state. Our Truth and Consequences Program, which focuses on the realities of substance abuse, has changed the lives of young Kentuckians. In a recent survey, more than 400 of them reported that they know of peers who no longer engage in substance abuse because of the program.

tips for getting healthy

Extension offers health-related programs for all age groups that focus on eating healthy and increasing physical activity. Due to these efforts, more than 12,000 Kentuckians made a lifestyle change to improve their health. FCS Extension agents also work closely with local farmers markets to promote fresh produce consumption. By conducting Plate It Up Kentucky Proud food demonstrations and offering recipe cards during the markets, agents increased Kentucky farmers market sales by more than $17,000. Oldham County FCS Agent Chris Duncan partnered with Oldham County Fiscal Court to bring food demonstrations and nutrition tips to Oldham County TV. “Cooking With Chris” can be found online by visiting www.oldhamcounty.net/oldham-county-tv.

Educating low-income families on the benefits of healthier eating and buying fresh foods resulted in redemption of more than $61,000 in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; Women, Infants and Children; or senior benefits at the state’s farmers markets. To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget.

Oldham County Extension also brings nutrition education to inmates in the substance abuse program at Roederer Correctional. Lessons focus on preparing the men for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Through various career preparation programs, we spread knowledge that helps Kentuckians attain employment or find a more fulfilling job. In the past year, more than 43,000 people used practical living skills learned through FCS Extension to advance their education or employment.

We are home to a vibrant group of Extension Homemakers. These members engage in numerous outreach projects to better their communities and Kentucky. One such project is the ovarian cancer screening fundraising program. Each year, Extension Homemakers contribute to this UK Markey Cancer Center program, which provides free ovarian cancer screenings to Kentucky women. Since fundraising began 40 years ago, Extension Homemakers have given $1.4 million to that effort. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also contribute to Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

For more information on local Family and Consumer Sciences programs, contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service via (502) 222-9453 or lauren.state@uky.edu. You can also visit us online at oldham.ca.uky.edu.

extension food safety classes

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Jennifer Hunter, Interim Assistant Director of Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Extension Teaches Food Safety & Nutrition Classes

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources and Family & Consumer Science articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Food Safety in Oldham County

Oldham and surrounding counties are home to many farmers markets, roadside farm markets, and community supported agriculture sites. Additionally, some farms sell to grocery stores and restaurants. A concern for producers and consumers is safe production, harvest, handling, and storage of food to minimize risk of microbial and other contaminant-related sicknesses.

farmers market produce

The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky Department of Agriculture developed Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) guidelines to reduce the likelihood of produce contamination. It focuses on safe techniques and inputs on all levels of the farm to fork food chain. Farmers that utilize GAP principles in their production proactively take steps to reduce the possibility of producing unsafe food products. County Extension Offices provide GAP training to producers throughout the state.

From 2008 to 2017:

  • Oldham County Extension has provided 15 GAP training sessions to 56 producers.
  • These producers sell products in at least 44 markets, community supported agriculture sites, grocery stores, and restaurants.
  • These producers sell in Oldham, Jefferson, Henry, Shelby, Trimble, and Barren counties.

At a conservative estimate of 500 consumers reached through each market, this represents a minimum of 22,000 consumers purchasing foods that have been safely produced by local farmers. GAP is an ongoing training program offered periodically throughout the year at Oldham County Extension, with training verified through the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

oc canning classes

Oldham County Extension also targets food safety during canning classes. Following Canning Boot Camp in June 2017, twenty-five Oldham Countians reported that they could identify research-based methods for home food preservation, safe methods of canning low and high acid foods, and signs of spoilage in home canned goods. Participants with intermediate to skilled canning experience indicated plans to increase the amount of food that they canned.

Stretching Your Food Dollars

Although Oldham County is one of Kentucky’s healthiest and wealthiest counties, over 5,100 residents live in poverty. Struggling Oldham County residents learn food budgeting tips at the Oldham County Extension office.

Over the past year, the FCS agent taught a series of seven Economical Entrée classes for Extension Homemakers and the general public. This “train the trainer” program reached more than 1,533 people in Oldham and surrounding counties. Post-lesson survey results showed that 99% of participants understood the entrée’s role according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 95% could identify economical proteins, and 94% felt confident planning meals using economical entrees. A six month follow-up survey revealed 89% of participants use new skills to prepare economical entrees at home and estimate saving $25.00 or more on monthly food expenses.

economical entrees

Extension programming emphasizes utilizing available resources to help provide nutritious food for a growing family. In 2013, Sheila N. attended a series of “Cooking on a Budget” classes that were held at the Oldham County Extension office. Her husband being an avid hunter, Sheila was looking for ways to make meals with the wild game that her family would find more appealing. Along with meal planning and money-saving strategies, the FCS agent provided easy and economical recipes that included venison and other wild game. Recently, Sheila reported that her family now boasts that they have the most delicious meals using wild game. Plus, Sheila has been able to be a stay at home mom and provide care for her children.

To help support individuals and families in tough economic times, Oldham County Extension partners with the Dare To Care Food Bank to provide economic cooking and nutrition classes using the foods donated to the mobile pantry. Participants learn about preparing healthy recipes, meal planning, buying vegetables and fruit in season, and other ways to stretch a food budget. Of the 70 plus families that receive supplemental food each month, more than 40% report using recipes and tips to save an average of $20.00 a week.

Inmates Pursue Healthier Lifestyles

The National Institute on Drug Abuse asserts that successful addiction treatment helps an addict become drug-free, stay drug-free, and be productive member of the family. In an effort to address the latter, the Oldham County Extension EFNEP assistant partnered with Roederer Correctional Complex to bring nutrition education to their substance abuse program. Lessons from the Healthy Choices curriculum focus on helping prepare inmates for a healthier lifestyle upon returning to their families.

Since the fall of 2016, approximately 60 participants have learned how to use nutrition labels to find healthy food choices for their families, proper food safety techniques, and stretch food dollars. Extension also provides low-salt, low-sugar versions of common recipes, such as Bean and Corn Salsa for healthier tailgating.

healthy food choices

Multiple participants noted the importance in keeping a daily food journal, especially in the case of previous health issues. One man expressed his hope that his diabetic wife could use this strategy to improve her eating habits.

Written by Chris Duncan, Oldham County Extension Family & Consumer Science Agent; Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Sherry Ragsdale, Expanded Food and Nutrition Program Assistant.

Staying Positive Provides Health Benefits

Importance of Staying Positive

Adult Health Bulletin

Did you know there are actually health benefits to positive thinking? According to research, people have fewer physical complaints if they think positively and reflect on things they are grateful for at least once a week. Staying positive is an important part of mental health.

health benefits from positive thinking

Staying Positive

When you are positive, it does not mean that you should ignore challenges or tough times, rather positive thinking is trying to see the bright side as much as possible. It may take some time and practice to start thinking more positively. Try these tips for living a more positive life:

  • Write down dreams and goals. One way to stay positive is to write down your goals and dreams for the future. By writing them down, you are actually setting the groundwork for reaching your goal. Be detailed about what you want and how you think you can reach that dream or goal.
  • Say thank you. Being thankful and expressing gratitude is an important part of staying positive. You can do this in many ways, such as keeping a journal of things you are grateful for, writing a letter to someone who made a difference in your life, and making an effort to say “thank you” to all people who helped you throughout the week.
  • Avoid worrying. For some people, worrying is part of everyday life. Instead of worrying, try to find a way to solve the problem you are facing. You may also try to distract yourself from worrying if it is something beyond your control.

healthy lifestyle

  • Watch out for all-or-nothing thinking. Remember that if something does not go the way you think it should go, it does not mean that it will always be that way. That one time was that one time. Take steps to have a different outcome if it is something that you can control.
  • Slow down. Sometimes, when things are moving too fast, we get stressed. Lots of stress can lead to negative thinking. If you are feeling stressed — whether that is happening while talking, eating, or even rushing around to get something done — take the time slow down. Slowing down will allow you to think clearly about what you need to do.
  • Eat well and stay active. Did you know that eating unhealthy food and not being active can actually make you feel worse? On the other hand, eating healthy foods and staying active on a regular basis helps improve your mood and general health.

stay positive and eat healthy

It can be hard to develop healthy habits like staying positive. Try some of these different ways to stay positive and see how much better you will feel!

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from Mental Health America.

Tips for Healthier Tailgating

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the Fall 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

oldham county fall news

Healthier Tailgating

Football season is here! Across the state, many Kentuckians will mark the season by getting out their tastiest tailgating recipes and firing up the grill. Unfortunately, some tailgating favorites like hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken wings, and potato chips can cause you to pack on the pounds while cheering for your team. Consider the tips below to help you make healthier choices this season.

  • Include vegetables in the game plan. Cut them up and serve them with a low-fat dip or hummus. You can also grill them and serve as a side to your main course.
  • Grill leaner meats like ground turkey, pork or chicken breasts for main courses.
  • Choose water whenever possible. Alcohol and sugar-sweetened beverages contain a lot of calories and won’t quench your thirst on those hot weekends that are typical of late summer and early fall.
  • Substitute fresh salsa and either pita bread or baked chips for nachos and cheese. Below is a Plate It Up recipe for a healthier salsa option.
  • Use lean beef or ground turkey to make chili.
  • Serve a fruit-based dessert like fruit kabobs or fruit salad.

More healthy recipes and ideas that use local ingredients are available through Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud, a partnership of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky Department of Agriculture. They are available online or by contacting the Oldham County Extension office.

healthy recipes

Cucumber, Corn and Bean Salsa

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 large cucumbers
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 yellow bell pepper
  • 1 small red onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/2 cup black beans
  • 1/2 cup fresh whole kernel corn, cooked
  • 1 ounce package dry ranch dressing mix
  • 1/8 cup cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, optional

Yield: Makes 20, ½-cup servings

Directions: Wash all vegetables. Finely chop cucumbers, tomatoes, pepper, and onion. Combine in a large mixing bowl with chopped cilantro. Drain and rinse beans and add to chopped vegetables. Add corn. If using canned corn instead of fresh, drain off liquid prior to adding to vegetables. In a small bowl, mix together ranch dressing packet, vinegar, and sugar. Pour dressing over vegetables and mix well. Serve immediately or refrigerate until chilled.

Nutritional Analysis: 50 calories, 0 g fat, 130 mg sodium, 7 g carbohydrates, 2 g fiber, 70% Daily Value of Vitamin C, 6% Daily Value of Vitamin A

Written by Janet Mullins, University of Kentucky Extension Professor. Edited by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Tips for Getting (and Staying) Healthy

healthy lifestyle

Create & Keep a New Healthy Habit

Adult Health Bulletin

Habits can be good or they can be not-so-good. Have you ever tried to change one of your not-so-good habits, only to go back to your usual routine? It can be hard to keep up the motivation for a change in behavior.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when you are trying to create and keep a new, healthy habit.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #1

It does not have to be “all or nothing.” Many times when we start to change a behavior, we tend to think that we need to be perfect 100 percent, with no slip-ups. Staying motivated at that pace is hard, especially if you are trying to change too many things at once. Instead, start small. If you want to start walking, find a time for just 10 minutes and build up to 30 minutes. If you want to start eating healthier, choose one meal a day to start. Pack a healthy lunch from home instead of getting lunch from a fast food place.

Just remember that you do not have to do everything all at once.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #2

Be creative. It can be hard to find the time to make healthy habits. If you get creative, you may be able to get a little “extra” accomplished. Instead of looking for the best parking spot, park in the back of the lot and walk, or take the stairs rather than the elevator. If focusing on making healthy food choices, pack your favorite fruit as a treat for that midday slump, or add green vegetables to a smoothie. These little boosts will help you reach your goal.

Building Healthy Habits Tips #3

Be patient with yourself. Creating and sticking with a new health habit is hard. And remember that it can take time to see results when making a change. You could write down your actions and keep track of successes and areas for improvement. Don’t forget to celebrate the successes that you have. Small successes can add up to big changes!

happy healthy lifestyle

Changing habits is very difficult. When trying to create and keep a new health habit, think about starting small to achieve your goals, be creative in changing your habits, and be patient with yourself as you strive to develop a healthier lifestyle.

Written by Nicole Peritore, Kentucky Extension Specialist for Family Health. Edited by Connee Wheeler, Senior Extension Specialist, and Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Source material from the Mayo Clinic.

Broccoli a Great, Nutritious Option at Farmer’s Market

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the June 22, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Farmers Market Broccoli

With June comes the start of summer and an abundance of fresh produce available at farmers markets across Oldham County. One in-season produce offering that you may not necessarily associate with late spring and early summer is broccoli.

Broccoli actually has two growing seasons in Kentucky. Kentucky growers began harvesting their first crop in May and will continue to harvest through early July. The second season ends with a harvest in the late fall.

You can steam, boil and microwave broccoli – or even enjoy it raw. As you will see in the Plate It up! Kentucky Proud recipe that follows, it can give a flavorful and healthy twist to popular summer dishes.

Broccoli is one of the most nutrient-dense vegetables that you can eat. It is a good source of vitamins A and C, beta carotene, folic acid and phytochemicals. Due to their high antioxidant levels, researchers recommend you consume several servings of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (like cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts) several times a week. A diet high in antioxidants can reduce your risk of developing some forms of cancer as well as heart disease.

When shopping at the market, choose broccoli that has tender, young, dark-green stalks with tightly closed buds. If you purchase about one and one-half pounds of broccoli, you’ll get four, one-half cup servings. Store broccoli, unwashed, in the refrigerator for no more than three to five days in a perforated plastic bag. Wash just before preparing to maintain its texture and prevent mold from forming.

Contact the Oldham County Extension office for more information on ways to prepare in-season produce and local farmers market offerings. Find Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud recipes online, or contact the extension office for recipe cards.

healthy broccoli recipe

Broccoli Grape Pasta Salad

Healthy Recipe

Broccoli Salad Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup diced pecans
  • 8 ounces whole grain pasta (bow tie or other)
  • 5 slices turkey bacon
  • 2 cups seedless red grapes
  • 1 pound fresh broccoli
  • 3/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup diced red onion
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar

healthy broccoli grapes recipe

Broccoli Salad Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake pecans in a single layer in a shallow pan for five to seven minutes or until lightly toasted and fragrant, stirring halfway through.
  2. Prepare eight ounces of pasta according to package directions.
  3. Cook bacon according to package directions. Cool and crumble into small pieces.
  4. Cut the broccoli florets from the stems and separate florets into small pieces using the tip of a paring knife.
  5. Slice two cups of grapes into halves.
  6. Whisk together mayonnaise, honey, diced red onion and vinegar in a large mixing bowl.
  7. Add broccoli, cooked pasta and grapes; stir to coat.
  8. Cover and chill for 30 minutes. Stir in bacon crumbles and diced pecans, just before serving.

Nutritional Analysis: 160 calories, 7 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 5 mg cholesterol, 125 mg sodium, 24 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 4 g protein.

Yield: 16, 1/2-cup servings

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status or physical or mental disability.

Written by Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Assistant Extension Professor. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

At the Farmers Market: Asparagus

The following Family and Consumer Science article printed in the May 4, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Farmers Market Asparagus

Oldham County farmers markets are opening for the 2017 season. Asparagus is one of the early-season crops many of our local vendors will have available.

Harvested during April and May in Kentucky, asparagus is a nutrient-dense vegetable that you can eat raw, lightly boiled, steamed, stir-fried or grilled. It can be seasoned with herbs, butter, or Parmesan cheese to enhance its flavor. As you will see in the Plate It Up Kentucky Proud recipe below, it can also be an integral ingredient in many dishes.

Asparagus is a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, and fiber. A half-cup serving of fresh asparagus (about six stalks) contains 22 calories, 2 grams of protein, and 4 grams of carbohydrates.

When shopping for asparagus at the market, look for bright green stalks with tightly closed tips. The most tender ones are apple green in color with purple-tinged tips. A pound of asparagus will make four, one-half cup servings. It will keep a week or two in the refrigerator when kept upright with cut ends resting in water. You can also store asparagus in the refrigerator with cut ends wrapped in wet paper towels inside a plastic bag.

Contact Chris Duncan, Oldham County Family and Consumer Science Agent, at (502) 222-9453 or crivera@uky.edu for more information on ways to prepare in-season produce. On the Oldham County Extension website, you can find more healthy recipes or find a market near you.

healthy asparagus recipe

Asparagus Ham Quiche

Healthy Recipe

Yield: 16 slices

Asparagus Ham Quiche Ingredients

  • 1 pound fresh asparagus, trimmed and cut into half-inch pieces
  • 1 cup finely chopped ham
  • 1 small finely chopped onion
  • 2 (8-inch) unbaked pie shells
  • 1 egg white, slightly beaten
  • 2 cups shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 container (5.3 ounces) plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup 1 percent milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Asparagus Ham Quiche Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place asparagus in a steamer over 1 inch of boiling water and cover. Cook until tender but still firm, about four to six minutes. Drain and cool.

Place ham and onion in a nonstick skillet and cook over medium heat until lightly browned. Brush pie shells with beaten egg white. Spoon the ham, onion and asparagus into pie shells, dividing evenly between the two shells. Sprinkle one cup shredded cheese over the mixture in each shell.

In a separate bowl, beat together eggs, yogurt, milk, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Pour egg mixture over the top of the cheese, dividing evenly between the two shells.

Bake uncovered in a 400-degree preheated oven until firm 25-30 minutes. Allow to cool approximately 20 minutes before cutting.

Nutritional Analysis: 200 calories, 11 g fat, 4.5 g saturated fat, 65 mg cholesterol, 370 mg sodium, 14 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 3 g sugars, 10 g protein

healthy asparagus recipe

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Assistant Extension Professor in Dietetics and Human Nutrition. Edited by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Summer 2017 FCS Events

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources calendar printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

All activities are held at the Oldham County Extension office unless otherwise noted.

June FCS Calendar

5 Homemaker Executive Board, 9:30 a.m.
8 Canning Boot Camp, 6:30 p.m.
9 Canning Boot Camp, 10:00 a.m.
13 FCS Council, 10:00 a.m.
16 Homemakers Club Reports due to Extension Office
21 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, La Grange Community Center, 1:00 p.m.
30 Homemaker Volunteer Hours due to Extension Office

July FCS Calendar

4 Office closed for Independence Day
10-12 Kids Cooking Camp
19 Wednesday Quilters, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
19 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, La Grange Community Center, 1:00 p.m.
24 County Fair Entry Day (Non-Perishables), 1:00 – 7:00 p.m.
25 County Fair Entry Day (Non-Perishables), 9:00 a.m. – noon
31 County Fair Entry Day (Culinary), 9:00 a.m. – noon

August FCS Calendar

1-5 Oldham County Fair
6 County Fair Entry Check Out, Oldham County Fairgrounds, noon – 2:00 p.m.
8 Extension Foundation, 9:00 a.m.
16 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, La Grange Community Center, 1:00 p.m.
TBA Homemakers Council

Drink Up For Good Health

The following Family & Consumer Science article printed in the Summer 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter and in the March 7, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

Drink Up For Good Health

We should drink water for good health, but some of us may not know why it is so important.

More than two-thirds of our bodies are made of water. It helps lubricate our joints, and without water, our organs could not properly function. Water is also essential in helping us remove waste from our bodies.

If you don’t consume enough water, you run the risk of becoming dehydrated. Dehydration can cause headaches, mood changes, fever, dizziness, rapid heartbeat, and kidney problems among others.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests adults consume between 91 and 125 fluid ounces of water each day on average. Individuals who choose water when they are thirsty and at meal time usually have no problem drinking enough daily. Water may also be consumed through healthy food choices like fruits and vegetables. Keep in mind that your daily intake amount can fluctuate depending upon your weight, age, sex, activity level, and certain medical conditions. You will also need to consume more water if you are in a hot climate, are physically active, running a fever, or losing fluids through vomiting and/or diarrhea.

drink more water

Below are some suggestions on how to increase your and your family’s fluid intake.

  • Keep a bottle of water with you.
  • Eat more foods with high water content like fruit and vegetables.
  • Add fruit to water for flavor.
  • Give children water when they are thirsty.
  • Choose water over sugar-sweetened beverages when eating out. Not only will you consume fewer calories, but water is free in most restaurants.

Check out this Kentucky Proud Strawberry Green Tea recipe that could help you increase water intake.

KY Proud Strawberry Green Tea Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 13 cups water
  • 13 green tea bags, regular size
  • 1 pound fresh strawberries
  • 1 cup honey
  • 1 lemon, optional
  • Yield: 16, 8 ounce servings

    strawberry green tea recipe

    Directions: Wash strawberries and remove the tops. Chop the berries with a hand chopper in a large pot. Add water to the chopped berries and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let mixture cool for five minutes. Add tea bags and submerge. Steep tea for two to three minutes. Strain the tea through a mesh strainer or cheesecloth-lined colander into a one gallon pitcher. Add honey and stir until dissolved. Chill and serve. Garnish with a lemon slice or fresh strawberry if desired.

    Nutritional Analysis: 70 calories, 0 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 5 mg sodium, 19 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 17 g sugar, 0 g protein, 30% Daily Value of vitamin C

    Source: Heather Norman-Burgdolf, University of Kentucky Extension Specialist in Food Nutrition