Supporting Oldham County Agriculture

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

“If it wasn’t for 4-H I do not think I would have developed the skills that have helped me take care of my own horse, and I would not have gained the knowledge that is helping me [study pre-veterinary science.]”
– Oldham County 4-H alumni

Supporting Oldham’s #1 Ag Commodity

The 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey reported a total value of Oldham County’s equine and equine-related assets of $163 million. Oldham County ranks 4th in Kentucky in value of equine sold, 5th in equine operation income, 6th in value of equine and equine acres, and 7th in equine population.

Oldham County Extension supports farm managers and horse owners through site visits to help troubleshoot problems and improve pastures and horse health. This includes improving pastures through reseeding, fertility management, weed control, and grazing management; improving horse diets; and hay testing.

The Extension Service also provides equine programs on worming, pasture management, vaccinations, showmanship, and tack care. Between July 2016 and June 2017, the county 4-H and agriculture agents, as well as numerous community equine professionals and veterinarians, taught seven educational sessions to 4-H members and horse owners. Thirty-six repeat attendees learned valuable horse care information that improved health and safety of both horse and rider.

oc 4-h horse club

Oldham County 4-H’ers at the Kentucky State 4-H Horse Show.

Through monthly educational meetings, 4-H horse club members build social and emotional skills like accountability, empathy, leadership, and confidence.

Beef Field Day

In Oldham County, pasture makes up 32% of available farmland and provides grazing for livestock. Livestock are important to Oldham County’s economy, with cattle alone representing over 2.4 million dollars in sales in 2012, according to the Census of Agriculture.

Because of the importance and prevalence of cattle production in the area, agriculture extension agents in Oldham, Trimble, Henry, and Shelby Counties have organized and held annual Regional Beef Field Days for farmers since 2005. These field days offer farmers an opportunity to see how production practices work on other farms. Field days also promote implementation of new practices that improve production efficiency while protecting natural resources, which are goals outlined in the county plan of work.

In 2016, this event was held at an Oldham County Farm. During the field day, 250 Louisville area producers attended and learned about:

  • Heavy Use Feeding Areas and Other Conservation Practices that Protect Soil and Water
  • Proper Handling Facilities to Minimize Animal Stress
  • Good Herd Health Practices and Update on Antibiotics Use

Farms make up one-half of total land acreage in Oldham County.

“Looking at the handling facilities setup helped me decide on changes needed for my own system.”
– Oldham County farmer

Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

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Oldham County 4-H Changes Lives

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Record Number Attends 4-H Camp

At Oldham County 4-H camp in 2016, 89% of campers practiced responsibility, 99% made new friends, 94% tried something new, and 95% learned something that helped them at school or home.

The program continues to grow with 226 campers attendees in 2017, increasing 10% from last year. To help support camp transportation, classes, and scholarships, Oldham County 4-H raised over $6,800, securing donations from businesses, schools, civic groups, faith-based groups, and extension clientele (including Green Thumbs, Master Gardeners, Cattlemen’s Association, Oldham County Homemakers, and Beekeepers).

Many of Oldham County’s leaders grew up in the 4-H camping program, experiencing life as a camper, teen leader, and now as an adult leader. The following quote epitomizes camp’s impact.

oc 4-h camp

“When my mom signed me up for 4-H camp, I was very nervous…I had the time of my life! I returned home and signed up for 4-H immediately. When I became a camp adult leader, I taught the caving class…[and discovered] I am good at training people…and I am now in my second year teaching secondary science. 4-H has made me the person I am today, teaching me to be kind, helpful, and how to live a successful life.”

Growing Up in 4-H

Teen Conference opened the door to career exploration for an Oldham County youth. Enrolling in the genetics workshop literally opened one teen’s eyes to a world of opportunity. She now works in the labs at the University of Kentucky on a weekly basis, running experiments and writing papers on genetics. A seven-year 4-H member, she has organized and taught eight project day events, all while remaining active in Shooting Sports and the Communications program.

oc 4-h project days

Teen 4-H’er testimonial: “4-H has taught me the important of goal setting, staying focused, and the ability to persevere through obstacles. Strong leaders are needed to move communities forward. It is very easy to sit back and let things happen around you. But I have learned through 4-H, speaking up and being a part of the solution is important but not always easy. But in the end, you can certainly be proud of the difference you make with your efforts.”

“4-H has made me a better leader, speaker, and teacher,” another 4-H teen leader told us. “I have gained not only public speaking skills but confidence. Teaching younger members has taught me patience and how to modify to meet the needs of different age groups.”

“As a 4-H member, I learned self-discipline, developed self-confidence, and mastered time management skills. As an adult Shooting Sports Coach, I developed effective communication skills, leadership skills, and the ability to maintain social responsibility. Participating in 4-H has had an incredible impact on my life, equipping me for the future, bringing me closer to other 4-H families, and ultimately, developing me into an upstanding member of society.”
– 4-H Shooting Sports coach

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; and Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

Oldham County 4-H Sweeps Awards

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Achievement Award Winners Recognized at 4-H Banquet

The 4-H Achievement Program recognizes members beginning in the sixth grade. The application is a detailed resume of the member’s 4-H and community involvement. Scholarships are available at each state level achieved. Congratulations to the following 4-H’ers who have completed a Clover Achievement Level:

Clover Level 1
Claire Combs
Ryan Hawkins
Bailey Johnson
Riely Johnson
Sean Johnson

Clover Level 2
Maggie Jones
Andrew Myers
Adelle Minor
Caroline Olds

Clover Level 3
Rebekah Anderson
Peyton Ash
Hunter Fackler
Ella Olds
Will Shannon

Clover Level 4
Maggie Anderson
Brooke Horton
Keirstin Kennedy
Ruby Mason
Shelby Shackelford
Ethan Willis

Clover Level 5
Noah Anderson
Ryann Horton
Meridan Myers
Max Renner

Submitted for State Level Awards
Hannah Anderson
Noah Anderson
Sarah Griffin
Beth Huffman
Molly Logsdon
Olivia Minor

oc 4-h shooting sports

Oldham County 4-H’ers Excel at State Shoot

At the Kentucky 4-H State Shooting Sports Competition, Oldham County 4-H’ers won a total of 44 trophies, 4 jackets, and 3 top scores. See the full list of State Shoot winners.

Winters News From Oldham County Homemakers

The following Family & Consumer Sciences articles originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

louisville area homemakers

Louisville Area Homemakers News

Congratulations to Dottie Crouch, the newly elected Louisville Area Homemakers President. Dottie was elected to a three year term at the Annual Area meeting on October 17 in Henry County. Seventeen Oldham County Homemakers celebrated the Area’s accomplishments over the past year with representatives from Bullitt, Henry, Jefferson, Shelby, Spencer, and Trimble Counties.

Three Oldham Countians accepted Area Chairman positions: Nancy Dahlgren as Parliamentarian, Becky Seidel for Leadership Development, and Paula State for Family & Individual Development. Peggy Townsend continues to serve as Chair of Cultural Arts & Heritage.

Celebrating Old-Fashioned Holiday Traditions

On November 2, Crossroads and Goshen Area Homemakers demonstrated ideas for a beautiful, economical Old-Fashioned Traditions at this year’s Holiday Showcase. Participants learned about gumdrop trees and the history of pompoms; made take-home crafts; and sampled recipes, including potato candy, Woodford pudding, and Scottish scones.

homemakers holiday showcase

Winter Homemaker Lessons

Join us at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, January 25, for Vegetarian 101. Chris Duncan, Oldham County Family & Consumer Sciences Agent, explores vegetarian and vegan diets, examining history, outlining health benefits, and reviewing possible nutrient challenges of a plant-based diet.

The average person moves 11 times over a lifetime (U.S. Census Bureau), and downsizing to a smaller home has become a recent trend. Learn the Ins and Outs of Downsizing at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 22. This lesson will be presented by Jane Proctor, Trimble County Extension FCS Agent.

Get Ready for Cultural Arts

Attend Spit Polish on Monday, February 5, to learn how to prepare a blue ribbon entry for Cultural Arts, county and state fairs, and other competitions. Class begins at 10:00 a.m. and ends at 2:00 p.m. with lunch provided. Free and open to the public. Reservations required by January 29.

On Friday, February 16, Oldham County Extension Homemakers will hold their annual Cultural Arts & Heritage Day at the John Black Community Center, located at 1551 North Highway 393 in Buckner. Entry tags and registration materials will be available at the Extension Office in January. See pages 27-29 of the Oldham County Homemaker Handbook for guidelines and categories.

homemakers cultural arts

Blue ribbon winners from the county competition will advance to the Louisville Area Homemakers Cultural Arts event on Friday, February 23, also at the John Black Center. Viewing of judged entries will be between noon and 1:00 p.m.

Written by Chris Duncan, Oldham County Extension Family & Consumer Sciences Agent; and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Take a Hike in Oldham County

National Take a Hike Day

hike in oldham county

Free Hiking Trails

The CDC recommends that adults shoot for 150 minutes of exercise per week. Take advantage of National Take a Hike Day on November 17, and find a new place to exercise! From public parks to nature preserves, beautiful Oldham County is home to a variety of green spaces.

Briar Hill Park

The hiking trail at Briar Hill Park is a natural path through the woods that takes you past a creek. Walkers and cyclists are welcome on the paved path that surrounds the playground area. In addition to walking trails, this 52-acre park offers picnic shelters, restrooms, basketball court, sand volleyball court, and tennis courts. A mountain biking trail is also under reconstruction, according to the Kentucky Mountain Bike Association.

Briar Hill Park is located at 7400 East Orchard Grass Boulevard in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve

Over nine miles of trails crisscross the 170 acres of Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve. Oldham County Master Gardeners tend the two-acre Woodland Garden, found along the forested trails. The nature preserve is also home to a frog pond, Nature Center, small waterfall, and Harmony Park.

Creasey Mahan Nature Preserve is located at 12501 Harmony Landing Road in Goshen.

oldham county hiking trails

Morgan Conversation Park

More than 200 acres of woodlands await you at the Morgan Conservation Park. Oldham County Parks and Recreation have announced that a shelter is coming soon.

“Morgan Conservation Park is a hidden gem with several trails (some steep, but worth it), good sized creek that begs exploration, small waterfalls, an old barn, ponds, a glade, meadows, and an old family burial site.”
Oldham Family Fun

Morgan Conservation Park is located at 1200 Kentucky 524 in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Peggy E. Baker Park

Home of South Oldham Little League, Peggy Baker Park offers 25 acres of open, green space for many kinds of activities. Other amenities include a playground, basketball court, picnic shelter, and restrooms.

Peggy E. Baker Park is located at 6887 Route 2858 in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Pewee Valley Central Park

Tucked behind the Little Colonel Playhouse, Pewee Valley Central Park is a beautiful green space right in the center of town. The city council originally envisioned this project, and passionate volunteers expedited the transformation of the space. Walkers can enjoy a short, paved, walking trail complete with benches, a small bridge over a fish pond, and covered pavilion. A red caboose is a short walk away from the park.

Central Park is located at 105 Central Avenue in Pewee Valley.

Wendell Moore Park

Covering 107 acres, Wendell Moore Park is a multi-functional venue. Here you’ll find the John W. Black Community Center, offices of Oldham County Parks and Recreation, Aquatic Center, and Elizabeth Cleland Cauley Dog Park. Wendell Moore is also the home of Oldham County Youth Football. Amenities include walking trails, picnic shelters, restrooms, playgrounds, horseshoe pits, disc golf courses, tennis courts, two softball fields with a concession area, and a lake for fishing from either the bank or docks.

Paved walking trails traverse the park’s gently rolling hills, offering multiple distances for walkers and cyclists.

Wendell Moore Park is located at 1551 North Highway 393 in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Westport Park

This five-acre park sits on the Ohio River in the northern end of Oldham County. A large green space surrounds the playground. Westport Park also offers a picnic shelter, restrooms, basketball court, horse pits, fishing dock, boat ramp, and boat dock. This is the home of the annual River Daze Festival, sponsored by Friends of Westport.

Westport Park is located at 6617 Main Street in Westport.

oldham county hiking trails

Wilborn Park

Found on the L&N Lake, this 30-acre park offers a paved walking trail situated around a playground and restrooms. Natural trails cross wooden bridges back and forth across the lake which is open to fisherman. Wilborn Park also has a covered pavilion.

Wilborn Park is located near 201 Lakeshore Drive in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

More Oldham County Hiking

Brownsboro Alliance

Membership is required to access the Brownsboro Alliance trail system. Hikers and horseback riders can enjoy over 14 miles of trails through Oldham County farm- and woodlands. Parking is available by the trailhead on Foxhollow Farm.

The Brownsboro Alliance Trailhead is located at the intersection of Highways 329 & 1694 in Crestwood.

Oldham County Greenways

Oldham County Greenways is a non-profit project working to establish an Interurban Greenway that will connect La Grange and Pewee Valley. Completed projects include pathways and the disc golf course at Wendell Moore Park and a three-mile trail along Commerce Parkway in La Grange.

oldham county hiking trails

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens

Formerly the site of the Klein Farm and Nursery, Yew Dell Yew Dell boasts fantastic gardens and a stone castle. This historical site is also home to three woodland ponds and more than a mile of hiking trails. A printable hiking trail map is available on Yew Dell’s website. An admission fee helps support continued preservation efforts.

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens is located at 6220 Old LaGrange Road in Crestwood.

oldham county hiking trails

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Photos by Lauren State Fernandez; Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Ann Stroth, Studio VII inc.

Yummy Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

Yummy Sweet Potato Casserole

Yield: 12, 1/2 cup servings

Casserole Ingredients: 6 medium sweet potatoes • 1/4 cup maple syrup • 2 tablespoons brown sugar • 2 eggs • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 3/4 cup low-fat vanilla Greek yogurt • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract • 1 tablespoon cinnamon

Topping Ingredients: 1/2 cup brown sugar • 1/2 cup ground rolled oats • 1 tablespoon maple syrup • 3 tablespoons melted butter • 1/4 teaspoon salt • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon • 1/2 cup chopped pecans

Directions:
Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Peel sweet potatoes and cut into 1-inch cubes. Place sweet potato cubes in a medium saucepan and cover with water. Cook over medium-high heat until tender. Drain and mash. In a large bowl, mix together mashed potatoes, maple syrup, brown sugar, eggs, salt, yogurt, vanilla and cinnamon. Blend until smooth. Pour into a 13-by-9 inch baking dish. Topping: In a medium bowl, mix the brown sugar and oats. Add in syrup, melted butter, salt and cinnamon; blend until mixture is coarse. Stir in pecans. Sprinkle over sweet potato mixture. Bake 30 minutes, or until topping is lightly browned.

Nutritional Analysis: 190 calories, 7 g fat, 2.5 g saturated fat, 10 mg cholesterol, 190 mg sodium, 31 g carbohydrate, 20 g sugars, 4 g protein

Recipe from Plate It Up! Kentucky Proud. The Kentucky Proud Project is a cooperation between County Extension Agents for Family and Consumer Sciences and Dietetics and Human Nutrition Students at the University of Kentucky.

Celebrate KY Homemakers Week

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article printed in the October 12, 2017 edition of the Oldham Era.

2017 KEHA Week

oldham county homemakers

Celebrate Extension Homemakers during KEHA Week

Kentucky Extension Homemakers Association Week is October 8 through 14, and the state’s more than 850 clubs are celebrating their accomplishments from the past year.

Extension Homemakers are firmly rooted in community service with more than 14,000 members contributing more than 300,000 volunteer hours for Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service-sponsored activities.

olsham county homemakers

KEHA members are huge supporters of higher education and youth. During the 2015-2016 fiscal year, the organization awarded more than $58,000 in college scholarships to deserving students and gave more than $14,000 in 4-H Camp scholarships. Extension Homemakers also volunteered more than 90,000 hours to support youth development activities across the state.

The organization supports several international causes including the Kentucky Academy in Ghana. During the past nine years, Extension Homemakers have helped the academy, which is a kindergarten based in Adjeikrom, Ghana, with various projects. These efforts include building upgrades, new furniture, and a new water well. Most recently, the group has raised money to fund the construction of a library in the village of Adjeikrom.

oldham county homemakers

Outreach efforts extend to local communities too. In the 2015-2016 fiscal year, Oldham County Extension Homemakers volunteered 20,866 hours to our community. Charitable projects included making lap blankets for the VA Hospital, sewing hats for cancer patients and premature babies, donating time and money to local food banks, and making and delivering holiday cards to nursing home residents. Oldham County Extension Homemakers also raise money for ovarian cancer research, Oldham County Community Scholarships, Oldham County 4-H Camp, Coins for Change, and WaterStep.

Joining Extension Homemakers is a great way to get involved with and give back to your community. If you are interested in learning more, contact the Oldham County Extension office via (502) 222-9453.

oldham county homemakers

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Kim Henken, Director of Communications and Strategic Partnerships for the School of Human Environmental Sciences, and Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Kentucky Burgoo Recipe

Jonathan’s Kentucky Burgoo

Servings: 8-12

This modern burgoo recipe comes from Lexington chef Jonathan Lundy and is very much in the spirit of the original dish, while taking into account modern tastes.

1 tablespoon olive oil • 2 cups diced onion • 1 cup diced celery • 1 cup peeled, diced carrots • 1/2 cup diced green peppers • 2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic • 1/4 cup teaspoon dried sage • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme • 12-ounce bottle of Kentucky ale or dark ale • 1/2 gallon brown beef stock • 2 cups braised bison brisket, diced • 2 cups roasted pork loin, diced • 2 cups roasted beef tenderloin, diced • 1/2 cup fresh roasted corn, cut off the cob • 1/2 cup frozen soybeans or lima beans • 1/4 cup chopped canned tomatoes • Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

In a large soup pot, preheat the oil on high heat and sauté the onions, celery, carrots, and peppers for 3-4 minutes. Add the mushrooms, garlic and dried herbs. Sauté for 3-4 minutes more. Add Kentucky ale. Reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for about 5 minutes to allow alcohol to cook off. Add remainder of ingredients and simmer for about 20 minutes before serving.

Can be made 2–3 days ahead of time and reheated.

Recipe from “Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon.”

OC 4-H Excels at 2017 KY State Shoot

Oldham County 4-H’ers Excel at State Shoot

The Kentucky 4-H State Shooting Sports Competition was held in Wilmore, KY on September 9 and 10. Fifty-three Oldham County 4-H’ers between the ages of nine and eighteen competed in .22 Pistol, .22 Rifle, Air Pistol, Archery, and Trap/Shotgun. Oldham County 4-H members won a total of forty-four trophies, four jackets, and three top scores.

oc 4h state shoot results

.22 PISTOL

3rd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
Kaitlyn Snyder

1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
Noah Anderson
Kaitlyn Snyder
Audra Spellman
Sydney Wells

1st Place Individual (Age 15-18)
John Clore

3rd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
Shane Bickett

1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
Shane Bickett
John Clore
Dain MacDonald
John Wells

AIR PISTOL

1st Place Individual (Age 15-18)
Cameron Rice

3rd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
John Clore

1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
Shane Bickett
John Clore
Dain MacDonald
Cameron Rice

oc 4-h archery

ARCHERY

1st Place Barebow Individual (Age 9-11)
Izzy Perez

2nd Place Barebow Individual (Age 9-11)
Tyler Zahradnicek

3rd Place Barebow Team (Age 9-11)
Sawyer McLean
John Morales
Izzy Perez
Tyler Zahradnicek

3rd Place Barebow Team (Age 15-18)
Sarah Griffin
Brandon Howard
Max Renner
Spencer Wieland

RIFLE .22 Sport

3rd Place Team (Age 9-11)
Sam Magsig
John Morales
Neil Simonson
Laura Worth

3rd Place Individual (Age 12-14)
Cole Powell

1st Place Team (Age 12-14)
Sarah Grace Jackson
Cole Powell
Audra Spellman
Sophia Worth

1st Place Individual (Age 15-18)
Cameron Rice

2nd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
John Clore

3rd Place Individual (Age 15-18)
Dalton Harjes

1st Place Team (Age 15-18)
John Clore
Dalton Harjes
Dain MacDonald
Cameron Rice

Congratulations to all State Shoot participants!

Educational programs of KY Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant. Reviewed by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

Fall 2017 FCS Events

The following Family & Consumer Science calendar printed in the Fall 2017 edition of the quarterly Oldham County Extension newsletter.

oldham county fcs calendar

All activities are held at Oldham County Extension unless otherwise noted.

September FCS Calendar

4 Office closed for Labor Day
16 Challenge Walk, Wendell Moore Park, 9:30 a.m.
20 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, LaGrange Community Center, 1:15 p.m.
25 Come Sew with Us, “Pillow Cases and More,” 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.
26 Senior Health Fair, Oldham County Health Department, 9:00 a.m. – noon
28 Homemaker Lesson, “Dealing Creatively with Conflict,” 10:00 a.m.
30 Autumn Colors Craft Show, LaGrange Community Center, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

oldham county fcs calendar

October FCS Calendar

2 Paid reservations for Louisville Area Annual Meeting due
8-14 Celebrate Homemaker Week
10 Perfecting Your Pies, 1:00 p.m.
12 Extension Council, 9:00 a.m.; District Board 10:00 a.m.
17 Homemaker Annual Meeting, Henry County Extension Office, 9:30 a.m.
18 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, LaGrange Community Center, 1:15 p.m.
23 Come Sew with Us, “Just Stuff It,” 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.
26 Homemaker Lesson, “Toaster Ovens,” 10:00 a.m.

oldham county fcs calendar

November FCS Calendar

2 Homemaker Holiday Showcase: An Old Fashioned Holiday, 10:00 a.m. – noon
13 Come Sew with Us, “Holiday Ideas,” 3:00 p.m.
15 Dare to Care Cooking & Nutrition Class, LaGrange Community Center, 1:15 p.m.
17 Louisville Area Diabetes Awareness Day, Shelby County Extension Office, 10:00 a.m.
23-24 Office closed for Thanksgiving
30 Homemaker dues and enrollment due to extension office