Classes on Cooking, Gardening, Sewing & More

The following Family & Consumer Sciences articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Homemaker Lessons – Open to the Public

Louisville Area Needlework • March 13, Shelby County Extension

Learn about Silk Ribbon, Cross Stitch, Basic Needle, Crewel Embroidery, and Creative Stitchery. Pick up an information packet at the Oldham County Extension Office, or contact us for the registration materials. Registration is due Thursday, March 8, to the Bullitt County Extension Office.

health classes

Couch Potato Challenge • March 22, 10:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension

A 12-week set of walking challenges based on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institutes’ walking plan, this program helps you get started walking at a pace that is comfortable for you! RSVP via (502) 222-9453.

gardening in small spaces

Gardening in Small Spaces • April 26, 10:00 a.m., Oldham County Extension

Gardening is one of America’s most popular hobbies, and rightly so. Gardening activities help promote healthy habits. The physical activity of working in the garden burns calories. As well, consuming home-grown vegetables is good for your health. Lesson taught by Traci Missun, Oldham County Extension Agent. Save your seat by emailing or calling (502) 222-9453.

Come Sew With Us

Sewing classes are free and open to the public! All ages welcome — youth must be accompanied by an adult. The project of the day is not mandatory; you are encouraged to bring your own project to work on. Project supply lists are available online. Please call and reserve your seat.

Monograming • Monday, March 26, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Gardening & Outdoor Accessories • Monday, April 23, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.

oldham county sewing class

Cooking for Diabetics & Everyone Else Too!

Making healthy food choices is part of managing diabetes. At 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, April 11, learn about cooking healthy, easy meals that are both economical and tasty. This free class takes place at the Oldham County Extension Office. Call (502) 222-9453 to reserve your seat.

Looking Ahead to Summer

Mark your calendars! Canning Boot Camp will premiere at 6:30 p.m. on June 7, to be repeated at 10:00 a.m. on June 8.

Jefferson County is hosting this year’s Louisville Area Homemakers Annual Meeting on Monday, June 25. The meeting will be held at Riverside, The Farnsley-Moremen Landing, located at 7410 Moorman Road in Louisville. Watch your email for more details.

Kids’ Cooking Camp is scheduled for June 26 and 27. Further details to be announced.

Written by Chris Duncan, Family & Consumer Sciences Agent, and Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.


A Twist on the Classic Easter Basket

The following Family & Consumer Sciences article originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

painting gifts

Easter Basket Twist

This year, why not try non-candy gifts in your child’s Easter basket? I’m not saying not to give any candy at all — just cut back quite a bit. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kentucky has the seventh highest obesity rate in the nation. An estimated 17 percent of children and adolescents ages 2-19 are obese. It begs the question, “Do we really need all those candy filled eggs on Easter?” Some children still have candy leftover from Valentine’s Day, Christmas, and even Halloween. Health officials and dietitians assert that moderation is the key, and this applies to candy too.

Easter baskets can be filled with special treats that are not sugar filled or coated with chocolate. Parents can choose gifts that promote the spirit of the holiday or follow a theme. How about a basket centered on cooking, painting, game night, or physical activity? Both boys and girls will enjoy side walk chalk, play dough, stickers, bubbles, keychains, books, and bath toys. Girls may prefer lip balm, pretty paper and pencils, jeweled pens, hair accessories, and scented lotion. Boys might like toy cars, trading cards, Pokémon, Legos, and action figures. In the end, you know your child’s interests. Fill their baskets with less candy and little more imagination this year.

Written by Annhall Norris, Extension Associate for Food Safety and Preservation, with the University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

4-H Rewards Hard Work

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Bronze and Silver Award Winners Announced

Congratulations to the following Oldham County 4-H members who received the State Bronze and Silver Awards. These individuals will be recognized at Teen Conference in June at the University of Kentucky.

Bronze Award
Rebekah Anderson
Peyton Ash
Hunter Fackler
Ella Olds

Silver Award
Maggie Anderson
Keirstin Kennedy
Ruby Mason
Shelby Shackelford

Hannah Anderson, Sarah Griffin, Beth Huffman, and Olivia Minor moved on to the interview portion for the Gold Award which will take place on March 3rd. Molly Logsdon is applying for the Emerald Award, the top 4-H award in the state. Congratulations to each of you! We are very proud of our 4-H’ers.

oc 4h awards

Oldham County 4-H Volunteers Honored

In February, two Oldham County 4-H club leaders were honored at the 2018 Kentucky 4-H Volunteer Forum. Paul Harjes received the State 4-H Certified Shooting Sports Achievement Award. This award was developed to recognize individuals who make an important, positive, measurable impact upon clubs, communities, the Kentucky 4-H Program, and the lives of 4-H members and/or volunteers. Jean Jenkins received the State 4-H Conrad Feltner Leadership Award in recognition of her exemplary 4-H leadership.

Oldham County 4-H’ers also received awards for their achievements. Molly Logsdon, Karmen Woods, Brandon Howard, and Sarah Griffin received the State 4-H Ten Year Member Award. Hannah Anderson received the 4-H Community Service Youth Award.

oldham county 4h award winners

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent, and Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Get Ready for 4-H Competitions

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

OC 4-H'ers Compete at State Shoot

Qualifying for 4-H Competitive Events

Attention: All 4-H members must be registered with Oldham County 4-H by April 15th, 2018 in order to qualify to compete in any 4-H events. This requirement applies to all 4-H competitions including Horse Show, Horse Contest, Dog Shows, and Oldham County 4-H Fair.

4-H’ers who would like to participate in any competitive 4-H horse event (this includes 4-H horse shows) must complete six hours of instructional training taught or approved by their 4-H certified horse club leader. Please meet with your leader now to ensure you will have your completed and documented hours of instruction prior to April 15th. Documentation must accompany your registration or show paperwork.

OC 4-H Fair

Oldham County Fair

The 2018 Oldham County Fair is scheduled for July 31 through August 4. 4-H projects will be entered on July 26 at the Oldham County Extension office and available for pickup on August 4th at the Oldham County Fairgrounds. Don’t forget: to be eligible to exhibit projects in the 4-H categories during the county fair, youth must be a registered 4-H member by April 15th. Watch for an e-mail notification about the fair catalog and the NEW online fair registration instructions.

Oldham County 4-H Dog Program

4-H State Dog Camp

Take your dog to camp. 4-H Dog Camp is the perfect opportunity for 4-H members to work with their dogs one-on-one and in group instruction situations. Dog Camp will be held at J.M. Feltner 4-H Camp on May 18 through 20. Contact the Extension Office at (502) 222-9453 if you would like to receive registration information when available.

Opportunites for 4-H’ers and Volunteers

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

4-H Speech Program Builds Confidence

Public speaking is one of Americans’ biggest fears. 4-H presents the opportunity for youth to conquer this fear at a young age by participating in the public speaking program. By learning public speaking skills, youth will have the confidence, organizational skills and composure to become the influential leaders of tomorrow.

The important thing is for young people to give 4-H public speaking a try. The earlier they begin the program and the longer they stick with it, the stronger their public speaking skills will be. Youth can deliver speeches on any topic they find interesting. As they look for more information on the topic, they develop valuable research skills. They also learn organizational skills by composing the speech and giving it the proper structure. Finally, they must use creative techniques to get the audience’s attention.

Competition begins at the club level qualifying for the county competition on March 26th. County winners advance to a district tournament on April 14th, and district winners advance to a state tournament, held in July at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Judges evaluate the presentation and the speaker’s ability to clearly deliver a message. It’s not too late to get involved in a 4-H speech program! Call (502) 222-9453 for details.

HELP! We need judges for the Communication Competitions on March 26 and April 14. If you are interested in volunteering to judge a speech or demonstration contest, please contact Kelly Woods at (502) 222-9453. We need your help to make this a rewarding experience for our 4-H’ers!

backyard chickens 101

Got Chickens?

If your family is interested in keeping chickens, your first step should be attending the “Chickens 101” workshop. The first session on March 1 focuses on Breed Selection, Chick Care, Housing and Predator Control. Get the rundown on Health and Nutrition at the second session on March 8. Please call (502) 222-9453 or email to register.

Oldham County Extension would like to organize a 4-H Poultry Club. If your child wants to join or you are interested in leading the club, please contact Kelly Woods via (502) 222-9453 or

oc 4h reality store

Volunteer at the 4-H Reality Store

South Oldham High School 4-H Reality Store will be held on Friday, April 20th. We need volunteers to make this event possible. Contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Office via (502) 222-9453 or if you can help out!

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent.

Oldham County 4-H Summer Fun

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2018 Spring edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

oc 4h camp

Join Us on Planet 4-H

Oldham County 4-H Camp signups are underway! Join us from July 16 through 20 at Lake Cumberland, as we make history by filling the camp with Oldham County campers. Check out our camp promotion featuring our campers online at Applications for campers and adult volunteers are also available on our website.

See you at camp!

oc 4h camp

Teen Conference is Around the Corner – Mark Your Calendar!

Oldham County 4-H teens, if you haven’t attended Teen Conference, you’re missing out! 4-H Teen Conference is for those who have graduated from the eighth grade through the age of 19. Participants select tracks, college visits, tours, workshops, and issues seminars. The conference will be held at the University of Kentucky from June 11 through 14. Financial assistance requests must be submitted to the 4-H Council by April 1 and the complete registration is due April 15th. Contact the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service for registration materials and additional information.

oldham county 4-h

Important Summer Dates to Note

District Horse Show June 1 – 3
State Horse Judging June 7
State Horse Contest June 7 & 8
Teen Conference June 11 – 14
State Horse Show June 30 – July 7
Kids Cooking Camp June 26 & 27
4-H Camp July 16 – 20

Written by Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Agent, and edited by Lauren Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant.

Supporting Oldham County Agriculture

The following Agriculture & Natural Resources articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

“If it wasn’t for 4-H I do not think I would have developed the skills that have helped me take care of my own horse, and I would not have gained the knowledge that is helping me [study pre-veterinary science.]”
– Oldham County 4-H alumni

Supporting Oldham’s #1 Ag Commodity

The 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey reported a total value of Oldham County’s equine and equine-related assets of $163 million. Oldham County ranks 4th in Kentucky in value of equine sold, 5th in equine operation income, 6th in value of equine and equine acres, and 7th in equine population.

Oldham County Extension supports farm managers and horse owners through site visits to help troubleshoot problems and improve pastures and horse health. This includes improving pastures through reseeding, fertility management, weed control, and grazing management; improving horse diets; and hay testing.

The Extension Service also provides equine programs on worming, pasture management, vaccinations, showmanship, and tack care. Between July 2016 and June 2017, the county 4-H and agriculture agents, as well as numerous community equine professionals and veterinarians, taught seven educational sessions to 4-H members and horse owners. Thirty-six repeat attendees learned valuable horse care information that improved health and safety of both horse and rider.

oc 4-h horse club

Oldham County 4-H’ers at the Kentucky State 4-H Horse Show.

Through monthly educational meetings, 4-H horse club members build social and emotional skills like accountability, empathy, leadership, and confidence.

Beef Field Day

In Oldham County, pasture makes up 32% of available farmland and provides grazing for livestock. Livestock are important to Oldham County’s economy, with cattle alone representing over 2.4 million dollars in sales in 2012, according to the Census of Agriculture.

Because of the importance and prevalence of cattle production in the area, agriculture extension agents in Oldham, Trimble, Henry, and Shelby Counties have organized and held annual Regional Beef Field Days for farmers since 2005. These field days offer farmers an opportunity to see how production practices work on other farms. Field days also promote implementation of new practices that improve production efficiency while protecting natural resources, which are goals outlined in the county plan of work.

In 2016, this event was held at an Oldham County Farm. During the field day, 250 Louisville area producers attended and learned about:

  • Heavy Use Feeding Areas and Other Conservation Practices that Protect Soil and Water
  • Proper Handling Facilities to Minimize Animal Stress
  • Good Herd Health Practices and Update on Antibiotics Use

Farms make up one-half of total land acreage in Oldham County.

“Looking at the handling facilities setup helped me decide on changes needed for my own system.”
– Oldham County farmer

Written by Lauren State, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; Traci Missun, Oldham County Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent; and Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

Oldham County 4-H Changes Lives

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally published in the 2017 Report to the People and reprinted in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension Newsletter.

Record Number Attends 4-H Camp

At Oldham County 4-H camp in 2016, 89% of campers practiced responsibility, 99% made new friends, 94% tried something new, and 95% learned something that helped them at school or home.

The program continues to grow with 226 campers attendees in 2017, increasing 10% from last year. To help support camp transportation, classes, and scholarships, Oldham County 4-H raised over $6,800, securing donations from businesses, schools, civic groups, faith-based groups, and extension clientele (including Green Thumbs, Master Gardeners, Cattlemen’s Association, Oldham County Homemakers, and Beekeepers).

Many of Oldham County’s leaders grew up in the 4-H camping program, experiencing life as a camper, teen leader, and now as an adult leader. The following quote epitomizes camp’s impact.

oc 4-h camp

“When my mom signed me up for 4-H camp, I was very nervous…I had the time of my life! I returned home and signed up for 4-H immediately. When I became a camp adult leader, I taught the caving class…[and discovered] I am good at training people…and I am now in my second year teaching secondary science. 4-H has made me the person I am today, teaching me to be kind, helpful, and how to live a successful life.”

Growing Up in 4-H

Teen Conference opened the door to career exploration for an Oldham County youth. Enrolling in the genetics workshop literally opened one teen’s eyes to a world of opportunity. She now works in the labs at the University of Kentucky on a weekly basis, running experiments and writing papers on genetics. A seven-year 4-H member, she has organized and taught eight project day events, all while remaining active in Shooting Sports and the Communications program.

oc 4-h project days

Teen 4-H’er testimonial: “4-H has taught me the important of goal setting, staying focused, and the ability to persevere through obstacles. Strong leaders are needed to move communities forward. It is very easy to sit back and let things happen around you. But I have learned through 4-H, speaking up and being a part of the solution is important but not always easy. But in the end, you can certainly be proud of the difference you make with your efforts.”

“4-H has made me a better leader, speaker, and teacher,” another 4-H teen leader told us. “I have gained not only public speaking skills but confidence. Teaching younger members has taught me patience and how to modify to meet the needs of different age groups.”

“As a 4-H member, I learned self-discipline, developed self-confidence, and mastered time management skills. As an adult Shooting Sports Coach, I developed effective communication skills, leadership skills, and the ability to maintain social responsibility. Participating in 4-H has had an incredible impact on my life, equipping me for the future, bringing me closer to other 4-H families, and ultimately, developing me into an upstanding member of society.”
– 4-H Shooting Sports coach

Written by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension Staff Assistant; and Kelly Woods, Oldham County 4-H Youth Development Agent.

Oldham County 4-H Sweeps Awards

The following 4-H Youth Development articles originally printed in the 2017 Winter edition of the Oldham County Extension newsletter.

Achievement Award Winners Recognized at 4-H Banquet

The 4-H Achievement Program recognizes members beginning in the sixth grade. The application is a detailed resume of the member’s 4-H and community involvement. Scholarships are available at each state level achieved. Congratulations to the following 4-H’ers who have completed a Clover Achievement Level:

Clover Level 1
Claire Combs
Ryan Hawkins
Bailey Johnson
Riely Johnson
Sean Johnson

Clover Level 2
Maggie Jones
Andrew Myers
Adelle Minor
Caroline Olds

Clover Level 3
Rebekah Anderson
Peyton Ash
Hunter Fackler
Ella Olds
Will Shannon

Clover Level 4
Maggie Anderson
Brooke Horton
Keirstin Kennedy
Ruby Mason
Shelby Shackelford
Ethan Willis

Clover Level 5
Noah Anderson
Ryann Horton
Meridan Myers
Max Renner

Submitted for State Level Awards
Hannah Anderson
Noah Anderson
Sarah Griffin
Beth Huffman
Molly Logsdon
Olivia Minor

oc 4-h shooting sports

Oldham County 4-H’ers Excel at State Shoot

At the Kentucky 4-H State Shooting Sports Competition, Oldham County 4-H’ers won a total of 44 trophies, 4 jackets, and 3 top scores. See the full list of State Shoot winners.

Grandparent and Adult Grandchildren Relationships

grandparent relationship

Grandparent and Adult Grandchildren Relationships Mutually Beneficial

One of the many benefits of living longer is grandparents get to see their grandchildren become adults. While scientists have conducted much research about the benefits and effects of positive relationships between grandparents and their young grandchildren, until recently little research had been conducted about the relationships between grandparents and adult grandchildren. Recent studies show that positive relationships between these two groups are mutually beneficial.

A study conducted by Boston College researchers showed that close emotional bonds between grandparents and their adult grandchildren is associated with fewer symptoms of depression in both generations. Researchers also found that grandparents who helped out their grandchildren and received assistance from their grandchildren had the fewest symptoms of depression. Grandparents who received support but could not reciprocate, had the most depressive symptoms.

Another study, led by a University of Texas researcher, looked at the frequency of grandparents offering support to their adult grandchildren. Researchers found that listening, emotional support, and companionship were the most common things grandparents gave to their adult grandchildren. The study also found that grandparents were a greater means of support to their grandchildren when the child’s parent was experiencing life problems or was unemployed. Grandparents listening, advice, and companionship with their adult grandchildren ran hand-in-hand with parents providing these same types of support to the child.

strong relationship with grandparents

As we age, it’s important not to forget the strong bonds that formed years ago as grandparents and young grandchildren. Everyone gets busy, but it’s important for us to take time to enjoy these relationships as much as possible. Whether over the phone or in person, continuing these relationships can be helpful to both generations in ways neither can imagine.

For more information on raising strong families, contact Chris Duncan, Family & Consumer Science Agent at the Oldham County Cooperative Extension Service, via (502) 222-9453 or

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

Written by David Weisenhorn, Senior Extension Specialist, and Amy Kostelic, Associate Extension Professor. Edited by Lauren State Fernandez, Oldham County Extension State Assistant.